Maria Templeton to Margaret Bayard Smith, 2 November 1800

ReadAboutContentsVersionsHelp
1

1

Newyork Nov: 2d 1800

At last, dear Margaret, I write to you from my own chamber and my own desk; there is something in local circumstances let the wise say what they will about it. I can always collect my ideas more completely in this place then in any other; yes Margaret better even than in your old apart ment for there the green fields and trees were constantly enticing me either to gladden my eyes [?] my home. But here while every external object is excluded by the venetian blinds, and all interior tranquil I can think of you alone, or of others as subservient to your pleasure.

I was called down & had to sit an hour with Frank Harison, and now the bell rings to invite us to church, I am not going. the walking is [vast?], and I have a very bad cold, and pain in my chest. I had a very unpleasant passage from Brunswick set off on tuesday last and arrived here at four Oc in the afternoon of Wednesday. the passengers numerous, and I, for the first time sick. Your letter was a cordial to me. I before enjoyed those to sister Jane & Maria, but I wanted something entirely for myself--the old part of character, you will think. Your letter was more pensive than those to your sisters, but you are happy you say, and you would not tell me so if you were not. What charming letters those were you wrote to your sisters. write them to me dear Margaret tell me what acquaintances you make & how you like them. What are your employments and your feelings, talk to me as you were wont to do in Pine street, in your chamber & [...] Scots. I will not give up the hope of being your real companion on the walks you have so much enjoyed some of my most pleasant [?] have been taken with you Margaret and it is not impossible but that I may at some future period visit Washington at least I will solace myself with the [?] of that [?]

All our little circle have returned except Mr Brown he is still in Philada uncertain whether he will return to Newyork or not [I] do not mention this however as it might perhaps injure his magazine. I have seen Maria Nicholson Mrs Brown, Jane Parsons Fanny Johnson, her brother, Mr Bleecker Mr M Ms Mills Drs Rodgers. Maria came down yesterday morning, and did not leave me till today. Mrs. Brown is quite sick with the ague & fever and out of spirits, she [...] herself on the prospect of meeting with you in Washington this winter. I was quite glad to meet Jane [...] and Fanny Johnson again, I could scarcely realized that more than two years have elapsed since I saw the latter, we met s cordially, our good dispositions towards each other seemed not to have lain dormant but increased. She spent friday afternoon with me, came at five Oc and did not leave me till ten it was like on of your visits, thou [...] it I thought of you at the time and wished she might make me [...]. We were alone till seven, we tlaked of Fanny Smith of her father

Last edit about 1 month ago by Sue Perdue
2

2

This page is not transcribed, please help transcribe this page

3

3

This page is not transcribed, please help transcribe this page

4

4

This page is not transcribed, please help transcribe this page

All 4 records