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Lane Oliver at Apr 09, 2020 07:08 PM

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trundling along quite like a certain great
ancestor of ours. We came up the river
& turned into this Bayou for the purpose of
examining lands. This is the great sugar
region & we have been looking & are yet
to look at more plantations. We are
pretty well pleased, but do not know
whether we shall purchase or not. It is
a most singular looking country. By looking
at the map, you will see that this Bayou
leaves the Mississippi River at Donaldsonville
& runs off west and south into the Gulph.
It is what the name implies "a fork"
& is a fork of the Miss. river branching off
at Donaldsonville & making for the ocean.

From the north at {illegible}, down to
Thibadeauxville 40 or 50 miles it is a
continuous village of small French farmers
with occasionally an American planter among
them. The Bayou is about as wide as
an ordinary street in one of our cities
& is navigable for large steam boats, which
ply on it regularly, & seem to pass just by the
door. There are also boats of other kinds &
I had well nigh said of all kinds also on
the Bayou. Sail, oars, flats & boats
drawn by horses which go on the bank
like those on the canals. Indeed it is a

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trundling along quite like a certain great
ancestor of ours. We came up the river
& turned into this Bayou for the purpose of
examining lands. This is the great sugar
region & we have been looking & are yet
to look at more plantations. We are
pretty well pleased, but do not know
whether we shall purchase or not. It is
a most singular looking country. By looking
at the map, you will see that this Bayou
leaves the Mississippi River at Donaldsonville
& runs off west and south into the Gulph.
It is what the name implies "a fork"
& is a fork of the Miss. river branching off
at Donaldsonville & making for the ocean.

From the north at {illegible}, down to
Thibadeauxville 40 or 50 miles it is a
continuous village of small French farmers
with occasionally an American planter among
them. The Bayou is about as wide as
an ordinary street in one of our cities
& is navigable for large steam boats, which
ply on it regularly, & seem to pass just by the
door. There are also boats of other kinds &
I had well nigh said of all kinds also on
the Bayou. Sail, oars, flats & boats
drawn by horses which go on the bank
like those on the canals. Indeed it is a