Club Minutes: The Home Interest Society, 1931

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we feel it should join. $3.05 was collected in the open meeting and Helen Hallowell said she would finish the matter. Helen Hallowell suggested we consider dropping the July and August meetings. The matter was left open. Annie Kirk was asked to write a memorial to Anna Farguhar. The Forthought Comm. for next time is Mortimer Stabler and Elza Thomas. For the program Edith Thomas read an article on the Decline of Good Eating by Julian Street. He compared French and American cooking. He felt that the quality of food had been superceded by scenery and service. Home Interest decided he had never been to Sandy Spring. questions Doris Lea asks if (?) and (?) flour will mix, Doris says no. she has tried it. Ethel Thomas read an essay on Goats by an anonymous author. Some one suggested our host was the Goat in this case, that in he wrote the essay. Mrs. Moore was ill or had stage fright or Home Interest has fallen from grace. she wouldn't ask a question. R. Bentley Thomas has 15 seasoned locuts posts for sale. Edith Thomas representing the hospital library asked for light wholesome literature to replace worn and soiled books, such as Joseph Lincoln Zane Gray and Mary Roberts-Rinehart. She also asked for varieties of flowers suitable for any weather. Duane Stabler volunteered help. Helen Hallowell also was encouraged to flaunt shrubs to dig deep and prepare to water.

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Norris Fussel is in too big a hurry with his hot bed. Two weeks later will do. The manure should be put directly in the bed and turned over several times. Watering will help Joe Janney gave an account of the fleecing of colored people by the Monumental Home (?) Co. and the Home Credit Co. Mrs. Harry Stabler asks if bulbs, which may or may not have been planted last Fall, will bloom this spring Home Interest Answer. If so - Yes! If not - No! The Gardener's answer - Yes! Yes! Mortimer Stabler asks If a wisteria vine 5 years old will ever bloom. Home Interest - Answer. Yes. The Gardener's answer No. It been (?) cut down, Milton Bancroft - asked about planting Scotch (broom?) such as the British (?) seeded at Yorktown, H. J. (Gelt?) - it would be as much of a fest as the British. Meeting then adjourned Hulda N. Janney. Sec.

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Report of Committee on Formation of a Local Library.

This Committee was appointed by the Home Interest, following a request from the Principal of Sherwood School for contributions of books for use in that school and was asked to investigate the possibilities of establishing a local library.

The problem presented was complex, involving numerous factors and the Committee is of the opinion that it can not be solved without a great deal of careful planning and preparation. The Committee was unanimous in considering such a project desirable, that it should be undertaken as soon as a practical plan for its formation and support could be evolved and has assembled such information as was available from various sources, as to the experiences of similiar developments. It was found that there was a small local library at Rockville which seems active and to fulfill a certain function. Also one at Laurel which has been in operation since 1910. Each was started by a goup of interested people who formed themselves into a Library Association, with annual dues of $1.00. The neucleus of books in each case consisted of donations presented by individuals amounting to 500 or 600 volumes. For the regular support and upkeep of these libraries various benefit parties are given from time to time each year which yield small sums, so that the total revenues amount to an average of $300.00 to $400.00 a year. From time to time donations of books have increased their holdings until each of these libraries now has from 3000 to 5000 books. The Rockville Library is given the use of a small building on the school gounds and is served by a committee of ladies who give their time as librarians during certain hours twice a week. The Laurel Library was given a small building is open on certain hours three days in the week. Its librarian is paid $1.00 a day farom the funds collected. The heating and upkeep of the buildings come out of the general fund. No accurate details of the effectiveness of these libraries were available but it was estimated that about 200 books were issued each week. The enthusiasm and belief in the good accomplished, shown by the sponsors of these movements deserves the greatest praise but in both instances the impression was made that a much more liberal equipment and support was needed in order to make the movement as effective as it should be. The funds seemed too small to meet the needs for new books and for the proper care of the old. The books contributed were too often of discards from shelves where they were found to be of little worth, and both libraries semed very deficient in solid books of reference on solid standard subjects. In investigating our own problem the committee found the school authorities very willing to cooperate to the limit of possibility. Two rooms are available in the Sherwood building for library use and according to Mr. Broome about $200.00 a year can be used from the school fund to purchase books selected by the Board of Education for colleteral reading by the students. These books could also be used generally when not needed for class work. No attempt was made to canvass the neighborhood for the purpose of determining the number of people who would be willing to form a Library Association but there should be not less than about 300 members willing to pay at least $1.00 to be at all effective. An interested response to a request for information was received from the American Library Association whose work consists of promoting the formation of libraries all over the country, and particularly in the backward and rural sections, as part of the educational opportunities which are necessary for a healthy, cultural growth.

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Page 2 Report of Committee on Formation of a Local Library.

The recommendation of this Association is that the support of a library should be given through public funds and included in the regular tax like a part of the school fund. Of course such a method is impossible in our case, unless the community was incorporated so that such a method, if employed, would have to be county wide. Such a county wide program has been approved by the Women's Federation of Clubs and would if kept free from politics and localisms be a great benefit to the whole section. The committee is of the opinion however that for our own problems even with a county library, a local library in which people could come in direct contact with filled book shelves and acquire a taste for books at first-hand would be most desirable. Such a local library if established could be made an affiliate with the county organization if and when organized and draw from that for material it could not obtain itself. The American Library Association considers that a group of not less than 2500 people should attempt to start a library if they wish to put it on a fully efficient basis. They assume however that such a librarry would have a graduate librarian and a full and up-to-date equipment. The committee has come to the conclusion after considering the matter with care, after reviewing all the inoformation available at the present time and in view of the present economic situation in our neighborhood as well as the welfare projects which are at present under way; 1st, that a local library conducted in close affiliation with the public schools but so as to make it available to all classes in the community is a most desirable and worth-while and even necessary development, for it believes that it would, by developing the habit of reading good and useful books among the young, open opportunities for betterment and progress. 2nd, that in view of present economic conditions it is inadvisable to undertake the project at the present time. 3rd, that every effort should be made and all useful information obtained to undertake some such project at the earliest practical time and to promote the support of this idea at every opportunity.

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March 31

Norwood 647 meeting of Home Interest - March 24 - 1931. Edwin Morris in the chair. The minutes of the last meeting at this place were read and the minutes of the last meeting were read and approved. The next three meetings were given as follows. April - Kennet-Cottage; May - Leacroft; June - (Iverlook?). Mrs Weld announced that Emilie Coulter and Sarah Kirk would have charge of the program for the next time - (?) more of that anon. The report of the community Council was read and accepted. Elizabeth (?) asked for data for the History of Sandy Spring. As usual the Mortality among the Forethought Com. was high. 50 (?) more reported missing. Elza Thomas carried on by the simple expediant of walking through the hall with a paper and pencil. This is the result. An alleged person (?) some hypathetical money should put it in the Savings Bank. Take manure off of the aspargus bed

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