Club Minutes: The Home Interest Society, 1931

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as soon as danger of frost is over and put 100 lbs coarse salt to every 150 ft. Get chicken houses ready for selling hens and baby chicks. Plant grass seed in bare places and roll yards while damp. Take geranium cullings now, replant after 12 hours. Cut back roses to 8 in, This does not apply to climbing roses. Dont have live stock unless you have plenty of feed. Hot beds should be healing. Take mulch from bulk. Be sure there are no hungry people at your gate. (Sec's. note.) This may be one reason for the cordial reception we received at the door at Norwood. Somebody told some one who told Elizabeth Ligon that alfalfa was delicious served us greens. Men and children first! This Sec. reported having written to Miss Engle as directed. Helen Hallowell reported that 25

Last edit 10 months ago by Sandy Spring Museum
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cents had been collected from each family as was arranged for at last meeting. The question of dropping the July and August meetings was brought up for discussion. Some felt that owing to the heat and press of work and other engagements it would be wise to drop these meetings. A quiet - but determined majority - thought there was no such thing as getting too much of a good thing and so voted to (prevent) this innovation. When the smoke of battle cleared away it was found that those favoring this modernistic tendency were (booked) to have the summer meetings. Poetic justice shall we call it-! Annie Kirk read the following beautiful memorial to Anna Farquahar ... (following these minutes)

Last edit almost 2 years ago by kwfarq
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Mortimer Stabler and Jean Coulter were affirmed as Forethought- - comm. For the program Margaret Bancroft read from the Iddings Letters. They covera period from 1859-1871 and were written by Charles Iddings of Riverside to his nephew Richard Paxon who went to California. They are written in the form of a log or diary and are a charming picture of the days of the rock-away? and oxcart of simple pleasures and genuine friendships. A life as he says "easy to enjoy but hard to describe." Life's tempo was leisurely, it's philosophy simple and kindly. After the [home?] tasks were done there was ample [time?] to read, to write, to sing and play upon the violin. There was time to walk across the fields to call upon the neighbors, to see the sunset or watch the birds and animals. There was always draw-jack and the soothing pipe to fall back upon. He was very modern with his expression "a good egg." Every name mentioned brought up fond memories to some one and we omitted the questions in order to hear more of these letters. His account of the celebration of the [?] wedding anniversary by exchanging bouquets was tender and thought provoking to this generation! When 10 o'clock came we reluctantly [SIDEBAR - left side of page:] However the building of a store at Porters' Corner near Ashton was done so quickly that it scared the horses.

Last edit 10 months ago by Sandy Spring Museum
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adjourned having voted to continue these letters next meeting. The program as arranged was moved forward one meeting. There is one item which does not appear in the typo written order of business but it is always lasta night-cap so to speak. Some one spins a yarn. An adult member of Home Interest explained about an installment moustache. A little "down" each month. If this individual defaults on many more of his payments, some body else will have a yarn about a re-(? ...suased?) moustache. Meeting adjourned Huldah N. Janney. Apr.31 At an adjourned meeting at the Community House Thursday night April 23rd Dianne Stabler was asked to represent the Society at the annual meeting of the Community Council. She was uninstructed

Last edit almost 2 years ago by kwfarq
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Another life was ended and a beautiful soul passed from earth, when Anna M. Farquhar left us for the unseen world. Though a member of this Society for a short time only, there can be no difference in the feeling of the Home Interest, the most of whom have known her for so many years, and some of whom have looked with wonder on her busy, and unselfish life. Born at Rock Spring near Rockville, a birthright member of The Society of Friends, she passed there her happy youth, and tho' saddened by its sorroful tragedy, she continued with her habits of usefulness during youth and middle age, ever in creasingly as the years went on. Some years after her mother's death she came with her father to the first home near Sandy Spring, where she

Last edit almost 2 years ago by kwfarq
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