Club Minutes: Mutual Improvement Association, 1928

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Sharon Cottage 10-4-1928 855th meeting

The eight-hundred fifty-fifth meeting of the Mutual Improvement Association held at Sharon Cottage 10-4-1928 was called to order at two o’clock by Rebecca Miller who acted as chairman.

The minutes of the last meeting at this place were read and the minutes of the last meeting read and accepted.

The Treasurer reported: - Cash on hand Sept 1 – 25.90 dues to Community Council 3.00 Balance, on hand Oct 1 – 22.90

Social Service League – On hand Sept 1- 21.00 Paid through Co. Fed. 21.00 Balance on hand Cot 1 – xx.xx Amount promised – 50.00 Paid, to Oct 1. 32.50 Amt to be raised by June 1, 17.50

Last edit about 1 year ago by rtzuses
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{2]} Next meeting place – “Norwood” on Friday the second of November.

Sentiment of the hostess – Hallie Bentley.

“There are so many things – best things that can only come when youth is past, that it may well happen to many of us to find ourselves happier and happier to the last.” George Eliot

Mary Robison’s sentiment

“No one is useless in this world who lightens the burden of it to anyone else.” Dickens.

Hallie Bentley read Henry Van Dyke’s lovely poem “Work” –

“Let me but do my work from day to day In field or forest, at the desk or loom, In roaring market place or tranquil room; Let me but find it in my heart to say, When vagrant wishes beckon me astray, This is my work; my blessing not my doom; Of all who live I am the one by whom This work can best be done in the right way.

Last edit about 1 year ago by rtzuses
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{3]} Then shall I see it, not too great, nor small, To suit my spirit and to prove my power; Then shall I, cheerful, greet the laboring hours And cheerful, turn, when the long shadows fall At eventide to play and love and rest Because I know for me my work is best.

Margaret Moore read of a prosperous Negro colony.

Alice Tyson, Mary Scott and Hallie Lea had nothing to contribute.

Amy Hutton read from Harpers an amusing story of temperamental artists.

Elise Hutton’s article cited the great advantages of the C L S C – to adults as well as to young people – a liberal education – the first circle was formed in Codytown in 1880.

The price of hams was given as from 50 to 60 c.

Elizabeth Stabler contributed a poem on the amateur farmer – many worries and troubles but a determination to stick.

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{4]} Julia Hallowell – some good sentiments.

Anna Nesbitt read of Tennessee’s new silk worm – a German industry – making synthetic silk from cotton.

Margaret Bancroft – a short story “Dusk”.

Stella Moore – the story of Mrs. Howe, who had energized her little husband. Stella found that her delphiniums have been suffering from too much water and crowding – the cure being lime and tobacco powder.

Mary Hutton – brought a message of love from Sallie Janney -who expressed her sorrow at being obliged to miss so many meetings – She asked that Anna Farquhar be privileged to attend whenever possible – and are pleased to accept Anna Farquhar as her substitute.

Last edit about 1 year ago by rtzuses
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{5]} Helen Moore's advice - borrowed from Edgar A Guest - is "Don't short-change in the little things of life."

Mrs Hough and Florence Bentley - nothing.

Helen Hallowell announced the sale of the old club books.

Alice Farquhar gave a good description of her recent trip to Cape Cod.

Mrs. Marshall - no

Estelle I Moore - read of Clementine Douglas, a cripple who has given her life for the Mountain people.

Mary Gilpin - no

Mary Nichols - "Who speak the best English? What is the standard and where can it be found? -

Rose Gilpin - several little selections, all with good intent.

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