Club Minutes: Horticultural Society, 1880-1891

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27 11/8/1881 - 2 - Brooke Grove, Lima beans and flowers Charlie Hawthorne flowers

The minues were read and no objection made to them. Henry Miller read an article on raising roses by slips which was approved by those who are most successful in raising roses. In June or just after they have blossomed is considered the best time for taking slips. The second reader, Frances Stabler, read an article on making lawns which, it was thought, would succeed without doubt, but, for most of us a slower process would suit our means better. Roger and Carrie Farquhar were appointed readers for our next meeting.

The vote was taken for or against an exhibition and resulted in 20 yeas 12 nays. The time selected was the 22nd of Sept. and it was further decided that it should be held at the responsibility and expense of this Society, and if the clubs and other Societies and the neighborhood generally, desire to exhibit articles we will be very glad to receive them, but, we The Horticulture Society of Sandy Spring, collectively and individually are to take all the care and responsibility and to us will be due the blame if it prove a failure, and consequently the praise will be ours if we succeed. May success crown our efforts!

Questions 1. What is thought of Minnesota potato?

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It is a large fine potato but late

2 Will Hydrangea grow from a slip? It will

3 Has any member been troubled with an in sect which eats the Fuchsia? All who raise them complain of it.

4 How distinguish between the roses be-longing to the three divisions Noisette damask and Tea? The Noisette are climbing roses. The damask are the rough leaved. The Tea are dwarf much more delicate and tea-scented

5 Is it too late to set out late cabbage? Occasionally it succeeds so late but not often

6 Where should canteloups be kept to ripen when pulled before they are ripe? In a mod erately cool place. Some persons say they are as much better ripened in the house as some kinds of pears are.

7 What time plant onion seed for setts to stand out all winter? No answer

8 Francis Stabler brought some pears which had been cut in half by the red squirrel for the sake of the seeds. They were anxious for the safety of their best pears and some other fruit.

The Burbank potato is recommended by Thomas Lea, as a very fine potato.

Roger Farquhar's very fine display of vege tables brought forth a little good natured teasing on the specimens of garden soil he exhibited at a previous meeting, which he silenced by some sensible re

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marks on the proper care of a garden. He has manured his heavily in the fall and after preparing it properly for the seed and planting them, they were attended to with care and regularity. It is his opinion, that the soil of a garden does not make so much difference in its productiveness as the cultivation after the plants are up; that the other im -portant operations on the farm should not be allowed to prevent cultivating the garden at the proper times for its best good.

Our walk in the garden was most satisfactory, all was in order and lux -uriant. The roses were blooming and all looked as it should

Adjourned to meet at Norwood Sept 6th

E. S. J. Sec.

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Norwood Sept 6th 1881

Norwood Sept 6 1881

The Society met with but two fam -ilies absent. Longwood and Edgwood Our guests were Edith Bentley and Nina Needles Carrie and Walter Brooke Sue Thomas Mary B. Thomas, Sadie Lea, Mary L. Moore and daughter, Clara Moore, Fanny Darlington John Bentley Harry Stabler and Frank Gilpin

The flowers were beautiful and abun -dant considering the very long spell of dry weather we have had. They were from Hermon, Olney, Rockland, Avalon, Alloway White Hall, Fulford and Bloomfield.

The vegetables were fine and came from Rockland, eggplant, okra sweet potato patty-pan squash, parsnips, carrots, salsify martynia, corn, tomato & cucumbers.

WhiteHall apples, pears, peaches, tomatoes grapes sweet corn sweet potato and a fine stalk of corn from Osceola

Sharon, Tomatoes and from Fulford 3 kinds of apples and some peaches and pears. Robert Moore brought a beautiful display of grapes which has been protected while growing, with paper bags.

The minutes were made and approved after which the subject of the Exhbition was intro

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-duced and a motion was made and sec onded, to reconsidered the question "Shall we have an Exhibition; after some discussion it was again put to vote and those in favor were about 4 to 1. The long dry spell has made a great scarcity of vegetables at some places. Carrie Farquhar read an extract from a letter on womens work from Mrs. Garfield to her husband

Questions

1st How shall I make a hen house? What kind of floor? Have a dirt floor and sash on the south side plenty of ventilation and dry earth to sprinkle in frequently and with the perches movable so that they may be taken down and washed with kerosene; the glass should have a protection of wire net

2nd A quince tree and a mountain plum which will not bear fruit. What treatment should they have?

It was suggested that the earth be removed for a distance of several feet around the tree and five or six inches deep and replaced with clay made wet and packed hard or that it be paved with brick or oyster shells

3" What is the best fertilizer for a straw -berry bed when you have no barnyard manure? Bone dust, ashes, and scrap ings from the pig pen

4 When plant German sprouts? Now, with out waiting for a rain

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