Club Minutes: Horticultural Society, 1880-1891

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Falling Green

May 2nd 1882

Our first meeting for this year, the April meeting having been omitted owing to the extreme illness of one of the originators of our beloved society. The day was clear with a cold wind blowing. Noon Temperature 59° The absent were Brooke Grove, Alloway Edgewood and Fulford and our guests were Mrs. Strain, Pattie Farquhar Phebe Stabler and Miss Kate Bradly Madgie Tyson and Mrs. Moors

The specimens were very fine, remarkably so, for the cold spring. From Longwood came two plates of pansies a vase of Rosebuds dish of Geraniums, heliotrope &c and a basket containing two kinds of radishes cabbage plants, tomato plant 14 inches pea vine 9 inches and asparagus.

From Hermon tomato plant 19 inches high pea vine 10 inches.

From Riverside asparagus and vase of Narcissi. From Rockland tomato plant 13 inches cabbage plants lettuce and flowers Roses, and a curiosity in tulips a petal having the green color and texture of a leaf and some inches down the stem a leaf more than half of which had the bright colors of the petals. From Sharon Avalon and Stanmore elegant

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From Rock Spring lettuce and flowers, Mrs Strain contributed a dish of lovely crab apple blossoms.

Our President, after a few appropriate remarks on the loss of our beloved member, proceeded to the business of the evening. The readers were both absent and Henry Miller and Mary Gilpin were appointed readers for the next meeting. W. H. Farquhar read a notice of a new raspberry "The Superb", and the secretary read an advertisement of the same berry sent by D. A. Lea.

The poultry report showed a much smaller number of each variety than were reported last May.

Rock Spring 72 chickens Sharon 32 chickens Longwood 150 chickens Avalon 38 chickens Falling Green 115 chickens Olney 20 chickens Riverside 40 chickens Norwood 95 chickens Rockland 136 chickens 1 duck White Hall 100 chickens 10 turkies

The minutes were read and amended.

Questions

What is the proper treatment for a cactus during summer? Keep it growing

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2 Should roses be trimmed if there is no dead wood on them? It is best to cut back considerably

3 How can hawks be kept away from chickens? Shoot or scare with powder or find the next and destroy it

4 Will it injure a calla to repot it in the spring? Try giving ammonia water first and if it still does not thrive repot and keep well watered or give entire rest until fall.

5 How often water hot-beds? Every day or oftener if they need it

6 Should mulch be left on an aspara -gus bed which is not to be cut this year? Leave it on and add some sand

7 What is the prospect for peaches? The general opinion is that there will be plenty.

8 Has anyone found a red raspberry that stands our changeable winters? The "Turner" is said to be one

9 How get rid of mice and moles in a garden? soak some corn and put strychine on it; the mice are to eat the corn and the moles are to eat the mice.

10 Is it too early to plant out tender plants? Decidedly yes.

11 How treat house ferns in Summer? water and keep growing.

12 How treat smilax make very rich and give plenty of water.

13 How eradicate yarrow in a Lawn?

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use the lawn mower frequently.

14 How late will it do to trim grape vines until the 1st of March except in cold late springs

15 Is it too late to sow celery? Better earlier

16 Is it a good plan to divide old currant bushes to make a new planting? Yes or set out cuttings of this years growth.

Samuel Hopkins has been troubled with having his young plants beets, onions &c die from having the roots disturbed by a worm which is very hard to find except early in the morning and hard to kill by mashing.

In our walk through the garden which had recently been enlarged, every thing was in order, early vegetables up, plants in the pit flourishing and a fine bed of rose bushes which were set out last spring, then very small from Dingie and Conard are now large flourishing bushes.

After a social chat and sup -per which were enjoyed to the fullest extent we adjourned.

Last edit over 1 year ago by RobertMyers
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Sharon

Sharon

June 6th 1882

Noon Temperature 67°

Our Horticultural Society met at the usual hour every family except White Hall represented by several members. Our guests were Mrs & Miss Leggert Mrs Tyson and daughter, Miss Bentley & Mrs Janney. After the usual reading of minutes the readers for the meeting were called for. Henry Miller absent so reappointed for next meeting.

Readers Mary Gilpin Henry Miller

Mary Gilpin read an article on pruning running vines such as the wisteria honeysuckles &c. in such a manner as to make them trees

Questions

I How can quince trees be made to bear? It was a general complaint through the neighborhood that quince trees did not bear. Some recommended putting salt around them, but only if well protected from horses & cattle

II Has the strawberry crop failed in this section? Yes fine bloom, but little fruit

III How can ants in flower beds be destroyed? Continual working would answer.

IV Why do the blossoms of poplar trees fall prematurely? Cause unknown

Last edit over 1 year ago by RobertMyers
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