Club Minutes: Horticultural Society, 1907-1917

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The Horticultural No. 5 Apr. 10, 1907 Oct. 9, 1917

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1907' 3 Norwood April 10th 1907

Promptly at 12 o'clock, the members began to arrive Every family was represented - The opening remarks by our President "I am glad to congratulate the Horticultural upon coming to-gether again with an unbroken membership, and tho' there are sad associations connected with this time of year, we still have much to be thankful for, particularly so if we but compare our lot with those who are starving and dying by hundreds, in less favored lands.

Our Society is becoming one of the oldest associations of the neighborhood and I hope every member will feel it a conscientious duty to add their might in keeping up the interest and sustaining the reputation of its past history. If we look back forty years we will find that two other similar associations have been inaugurated thro' the influence of our society in leading the way, to say nothing of the benefit it has been in teaching us to appreciate and love the cultivation of fruits vegetables and flowers, and thereby adding to the comfort and happiness of ourselves and others."

The minutes of last meeting held Oct. 2nd at Riverside, were read and approved. Readers; 1st Eliza Moore was excused, a bad cold preventing the use of her voice. Her sister read "A a plea for some old friends and a petition for some new ones" an essay written by her for the farmers Institute. It is so excellent and interesting an article, it is difficult to find any sentence which can be shared, in making a synopsis for this paper. It is a plea for the preservation of the historic trees of our country and for

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the observance of arbor day, giving examples set by other countries in the care of forestry and the benefits derived by reclaiming sterile tracts and the influence of trees on the climate.

The spraying of fruit trees should be done frequently. One pound of "London purple" to 200 gallons of water or 1/2 lb Paris green to 200 gallons of water. Prof VanDeman, pomologist of U.S. Dep. of Ag. says it would be necessary for a person to eat two tons of grapes, to be poisoned by these recipes! 2nd reader Mary Stabler, "Some troublesome insect," Those which appear more than once in the summer need frequent doses of helebore. Wach for the Codlin moth among apples. Osage orange hedges a harbor for many varieties. Sarah Kirk read, by request, a letter from Chas. A. Cyphers on weak legs in chickens. "Don't over feed nor keep too warm. Give an abundance of fresh air and let them exercise by hunting for their food in chaff scattered on the floor." Volunteer by Kate Janney "Five minute flights with insects" Five minutes a day will keep insects down more thoroughly than three hours once a week, begin the fights before the insects get settled down to house-keeping Get three old buckets holding a quart or more; drop a bar of common yellow soap in one, fill it with water. Put Bordeaux mixture in one, and old cigar stumps or tobacco scraps in the third - Use the soap suds for rose bugs and catterpillars; The Bordeaux for leaves curling and turning yellow. Use tobacco water for Roses, Chrysanthemums etc. Sulphur coal ashes, and soot all good insecticides.

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