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83

causes a very great sound, or when one extinguishes
hot coals. But the lightning that comes from the thunder
appears first and then you hear the sound, because the
sight of men is more keen than their hearing. So it is when
one sees across the water cloth being beaten or a hammer
striking, one first sees the blow landed by the one doing it,
and then one hears the sound of the blow. In the same way
I can tell you that it is thunder that one sees before
one has heard it. And since it is so far above us, so much
greater is the gap between the sound and the flash, and after
one has seen it, then one hears its force. But the faster
one hears the sound after the flash, the closer the thunder is.
[rubric:] In order to know how winds come to be.
One can understand the winds by considering the seas.
For they blow often all around the earth
and collide with each other in some places so fiercely
that they rise along the sides of a mountain such that they
force themselves into the air above it and the air that is
forced out from that place pushes other air
in such a way that it returns rearward, roaring and undulating
like flowing water. For wind is nothing other than

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Marie Richards

original ms. Folio 83r
Walters ms. Folio 88r
BL Royal MS 19 A IX fols 95v-96r
Caxton, ed. Prior, p 121
Gossuin, ed. Prior, 151-152