Correspondence (incoming) - H

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Hackett, Mrs. B. S.; Hackness, H. W.; Hanks, Henry G.; Harris, Thomas; Haven, Alfred C.; Havrmann, W.; Hayes, Leslie; Heller, N. B.; Henry, L. D.: 5/7/1889 requesting a road be laid from the Palo Alto station south to county road; Hilton, Mrs. J.M.; Hoitt, Ira G.; Howell, Lena L.; Huntington Hopkins Company



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have trespassed. I am

Sincerely Yours

Alice R. Jordan

Yale College

New Haven, Conn

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Needs Review

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[preprinted] L. N. KEATING, ATTORNEY,

MUSKEGON NATIONAL BANK BUILDING

FIRST FLOOR, - - NO. 11 FIRST AVENUE, RESIDENCE, 87 HOUSTON AVENUE.

Attention given to Corporation Cases. Settlements made. Trustee Estates managed. Bonds Procured for Clients in Surety Companies. Gilt Loans with Collaterals, or Joint Makers or Endorsers Placed.

Muskegon Mich., [/preprinted] April 30th. 1889.

[large notation in red: 165]

Hon. Leland Stanford,

Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Cal.

My Dear Sir:-

Some time ago when you were in Washington I took the liberty of writing to you for information in regard to your university at Palo Alto, to which you kindly replied, by forwarding to me, the printed proceedings relating to the dedication of this university. Since then I learn through the newspapers that the university is to be opened this fall. Can you kindly place me in communication with any one who can inform me as to what branches of the university will be opened, and student rates including expenses of tuition, board and incidentals, and when it will be opened this fall. I have three children, two girls and a boy, and I have been watching the growth of this university with a great deal of interest. Any information which you can kindly give me in regard to the university opening this fall, and the courses of study, and the other points asked above, will be gladly received by me.

Yours &c., L. N. Keating.

E.

[notation, left margin and bottom margin, shorthand]

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Needs Review

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San Jose, Cal.

May 24 1889.

Senator Stanford.

Dear Sir:-

I am anxious to attend your school when it opens. I have not been able to learn any thing about it, and I did not know who to apply to. Please give me necessary information.

Respectively yours,

Millie Keiser,

San Jose.

Cal.

Box 962

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Needs Review

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Carthage Ill. June 7th 1887

Dear Sir:

Although entirely unknown to you your unprecedented liberality in the cause of education encourages me to address you.

For some years I have had in mind a mode of administering money in the cause of education which if not entirely novel would yet in a practical way be a new departure in the educational method.

My idea is to establish in the university curriculum a sort of roving school. The practical way to teach the natural sciences is to bring the students face to face with nature. Nature presents so many faces in mountain & valley & sea & shore that within the close edifice no matter how well situated, a great number of her most important & loveliest features must escape attention. Briefly: I would propose a floating school in which nearly all the natural & physical sciences might be most successfully taught.

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The ultimate outcome of this plan would be to possess a substantial steamer under command of an accomplished seaman & navigator with a small corps of adjunct professors or teachers in the several departments of mathematics, physics & the natural sciences. This would become an unrivalled seminary for practical surveying & navigation. In such a roving school geology mineralogy, botany, zoology & mining could be most rapidly & thoroughly taught. Connected with such a vessel a small steam launch of light draught would be needed capable of entering all lagunes & rivers to carry classes inland to visit mines & make geological botanical & zoological explorations.

For geological natural history & surveying expeditions some general camping outfit would also be needed. Such an adjunct to the university would furnish unrivalled facilities for making natural history collecting & laboratory stations might be established at convenient points for prosecuting biological [researches?]

I think also such a school would [insert: be] unrivalled for stimulating anew the decaying zeal for real scientific seamanship in

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