Correspondence (incoming) - H

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Hackett, Mrs. B. S.; Hackness, H. W.; Hanks, Henry G.; Harris, Thomas; Haven, Alfred C.; Havrmann, W.; Hayes, Leslie; Heller, N. B.; Henry, L. D.: 5/7/1889 requesting a road be laid from the Palo Alto station south to county road; Hilton, Mrs. J.M.; Hoitt, Ira G.; Howell, Lena L.; Huntington Hopkins Company



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the nation. The out-door & varied life would be a great adjuvant in developing a first class physique in students I think far more than equal to base ball matches & rowing clubs.

The old monastic methods of our schools is it seems to me illy fitted to the needs of modern life & & far in the rear of an enlightened civilization. We find in the close in-door life of scholars an explanation of the unpractical in science & the true ground of the prejudice which is prevalent toward scientific agriculture, mining, engineering & seamanship. We also explain the relative success of so called self-educated men in the practical professions by the development in them of common out-door sense for the administration of business. Our roving school could regularly inspect all manufacturing, engineering & mining work going on in various parts of the country. By shifting about from climate to climate many dangers & rigors incident to exposure &c might be diminished to a minimum. I doubt not very many students in other universities would be sure to be willing at the ordinary expense of college life to enroll themselves in such a floating school for a year or two.

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[4?]

I hope I see in your name Leland an omen of our future joint interest in educational work as we perhaps share also in a common descent from the old New England puritan Henry Leland.

I am with much regard

Geo. M Kellogg A.M. M.D.

Carthage Ill.

To the Hon. Leland Stanford

San Francisco Cal

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Kennebunk Port, Me,

Septber 6 1887

A. C. Nash, Esqu

Secretary of the Leland Stanford Junior University at Palo Alto, Cal.

San Francisco, Cal.

Dear Sir,

Your favor of the 29th [just,? inst.?] was duly received. I am glad to hear that my letter will be kept on file, and shall in due time send you the necessary Testimonials and References.

Meanwhile believe me very truly yours

[Klemmer?]

Addreſs fr. Septber 19th

Prof. R. F. [Klemmer?], 291 Spring Str. Portland, [Me?]

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PROSPECTUS of the PALAEONTOLOGICAL, GEOLOGICAL AND MINERALOGICAL COLLECTIONS of

Dr. v. KLIPSTEIN, PROFESSOR OF GEOLOGY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF GIESSEN GRANDUCHY OF HESSEN

PALAEONTOLOGICAL PART.

It is divided in geografic groups with peculiar consideration of the geognostic horizons and represents the 5 parts of the globe. The cultivated parts naturally allow easier to acquire scientific materials and are therefore with the nearer istuated countries richer collected. Capitally represented are the interesting and most important localities of the Austrian and Italian Alps. I have collected there during 20 years partly for myself alone, partly together with my friends and colleague professor ZITTEL of Munich, with EDMOND VON MOISISOVICS and FELIX KARRER of Vienna, who were charged from their governments to collect the grand museums of Munich and Vienna.

Nearly all interesting and instructive localities for petrafacts have been exploited with many difficulties. Particularly amply I have collected in the formations and localities of St. Cassian, Esino, Marmolata (a new locality of Esino piles), Hallstadt, Gosau and Hierlatz &c.

In the alpine geological horizons exist very great differences as regards richness of the petrafacts and the opulence of different species in the different piles. Compare only the rich piles and lays of petrefacts of St. Cassian to the poor ones of the chief dolomite or the wealth of the Gosau and Hallstadt formations with the rareness of petrefacts in the Dachsteinlimestone. Corresponding with these differences of production you will find the number of exemplars in the following catalogue. The kinds and species of the different geografical groups of the whole collection with few exceptions caused by want of some necessary publications are fixed after the newest state of science with named authors.

As the collection is put on geografically it requires to divide it in chief groups and subdivisions representing the different localities of the geological horizons. We begin with

[columns]

I. CHIEF GROUP. AUSTRIAN AND ITALIAN ALPS.

A) SUBDIVISION OF THE SOUTHERN CHAIN OF ALPS.

................................................................................ Number of exemplars

1) The piles of St. Cassian represented by 6 different localities (Alp Stuores, Prelongei, Valparola, nearest circuits of St. Cassian, Alp Pescol and Seeland) .............................................................................. 7000

2) Fauna of the Raiblerpiles:

a) Holygosts' church near St. Leonhard .......................................... 140

b) Schlern .................................................................................... 110

c) Raibl ........................................................................................ 120

3) Hierlatzpiles (lower Lias) of Fanes ............................................. 150

4) Klauspiles (Malm) of the castel Terino (near the Cima d'Asta) ........ 20

5) Piles of Wengen (Wengen and Corvara) ....................................... 60

6) Piles of Seiss and Campil (Campitello, Logoschell and Grones) ...... 60

[end column one]

[column two]

................................................................................ Number of exemplars

7) Chief dolomite of Southtirol different localities particularly from the group of the Tofana ................................................................................. 30

8) Upper Muschelkalk:

a) Wengen .................................................................................... 120

b) Recoaro ...................................................................................... 40

9) Formations of Tithon of the Fanes, of Trento, Roveredo etc. ......... 160

10) Esinoformation of Esino near Varenna on the lake of Como ........ 150

11) Esino (?) piles of the Marmolata ................................................. 300

12) Kössenpiles (Rhaetish) of the Val Lorina ........................................ 6

13) Neocom of the Gerdenazza, of the Zwischenkofel and of the Fanis 120

14) Subalpineformations of Eocen (Nummuliten) and Oligocen of the country near Vicenza and Verona ................................................................ 500

15) Subalpinechalkformation (craie, Scaglia and Biancone) ................ 30

........................................................................................ Summa 9116

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---- 2 ---

Eighty or hundred exemplars of these are vertebra (fishes and sauriers), all the others belong to the groups of Coelenterata, Echinodermata, Mollusca, except few Annelids. Some not yet fixed forms will probably be Arthropods. To No 14 still belong 40 - 50 exemplars of fossil plants and 10 exemplars of Crustacees.

B) SUBDIVISION OF THE NORTHERN CHAIN OF ALPS.

....................................................................................... Number of ex.

1) Piles of Hallstadt from the Deltchen, Sandling, Raschberg, near Aussee, from Steïnberg- and Someraukogel near Hallstadt and from the Rossmoos near Goysern ............................................................................. 900

2) Piles of Kössen from Kössen and Reit ...................................... 110

3) Piles of Adneth from the Kammerkahr and its environs ............ 150

4) The same piles from the circuits of the lake of Wolfgang ........... 120

5) Middle Lias from the Schafberg .............................................. 160

6) Piles of Hierlatz from the Hierlatz near Hallstadt ..................... 520

7) Superior Jura from Vils ............................................................ 60

8) Piles of Zlambach .................................................................... 30

9) Fauna of the Gosau (Turonien and Senonien of the chalkformation):

a) Gosau basin and Russbach .................................................... 2220

b) Environs of the lake of Wolfgang .............................................. 50

c) Brandenberg .......................................................................... 150

d) Alp Cadoi beneath the yoke of the Sonnenwend ....................... 170

e) Untersberg near Salzburg ......................................................... 50

10) Eocen (Nummulites) formations of the Kressenberg near Traunstein 400

11) The same from Häring .......................................................... 120

12) Mediterrane (afer Moisisovics) from Hall ................................. 15

Summa .................................................................................... 5200

To No. 10 belong 15-20 exemplars of vertebra to No 11 40-50 ex. of the fossil flora of Häring. The greatest part of this division consists of Mollusks, Echinodermata pp. - It is still to remark that amongst the palaeontological divisions of the eastern Alps are many suits of quite new not yet scientifically fixed or described forms, which will be of a peculiar interest.

II. CHIEF GROUP.

THE AUSTRIAN PROVINCES IN THE NORTH FROM THE ALPS.

A) BOHEMIA (subdivision)

........................................................................................ Number of ex.

1) Bohemian Silur and Devon:

a) Crustacies ............................................................................. 220

b) Graphtolites ........................................................................... 15

c) Brachiopodes, Cephalopods, Gasteropods, Conifers, Crinoïds, Koralls pp. ................................................................................................. 180

2) Bohemian chalk .................................................................... 120

[end column one]

[column two]

B) COUNTRIES OF THE SUPERIOR DANUBE (subdivision)

........................................................................................ Number of ex.

1) Tertiary basin of Vienna .......................................................... 880

C) COUNTRIES OF THE DANUBE INFERIOR (subdivision)

1) Tithon of the Karpaths ............................................................ 320

2) Tertiary fauna of Transylvania .................................................. 80

III. CHIEF GROUP.

GERMANY.

A) SOUTH OF GERMANY (subdivision).

....................................................................................... Number of ex.

1) Trias of south Germany ............................................................ 30

2) Jura of:

a) Suabish Jura .......................................................................... 940

b) Frankonian Jura (30 vertebra and 15 crustacees belongs to them) ................................................................................................. 580

3) Fauna of the tertiary from the middle Rhine:

a) Mollusces pp. ...................................................................... 3820

b) Vertebra ............................................................................. 1560

4) Sweet water formations from Steinheim and Oehningen with 20 vertebra 80

5) Pliocaen from Miesbach, Schliersee and Ortenburg ................. 40

6) Tertiary formations from Märing and Traunstein ..................... 20

7) Vertebra (fishes and sauriers) from the carboniferous sytem near Saarbrücken .............................................................................. 30

Summa .................................................................................. 7100

B) NORTH OF GERMANY (subdivision).

........................................................................................ Number of ex.

1) Devonish formation on the Rhine .......................................... 480

2) Devonish formation on the Harz ............................................. 50

3) Devon Limecoal and Silur in Silesie ....................................... 180

4) Trias in the North of Germany ................................................ 80

5) Jura in the northwestern Germany:

a) shells (Schaalenthiere) .......................................................... 600

b) Vertebra ............................................................................... 120

6) Jura in the northeastern Germany .......................................... 120

7) Chalk (Kreide) formation in the North of Germany .................. 830

8) Tertiary formations in the North of Germany:

a) Eocen from Bünde .................................................................. 30

b) Oligocen middle and lower from Sattdorf and Söllingen .......... 280

c) Miocen from Langenfeld ........................................................ 120

d) Miocen from the Habichtswald ................................................ 40

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