Wesley C. Sawyer

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1885, Dec. 22: heard of conspiracy to exterminate Chinese in California; would like a position with the university; 1886, April 14: thoughts on university library's needs, Sawyer family history being written; 1887, June 6: working on his book, planning to come to California



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by no desire to secure by favor any position in the University higher than my qualifications and experience would warrant, but rather by the assurance that my personal desire to serve the Institution cannot fail of a hearing on its merits; and, further, I am more than pleased with your grand opportunity to assist in giving shape and effectiveness to so noble a benefaction to mankind.

I do not fully remember what I said on the Library subject in my former letter. The more I thought about it, the more I was impressed that the comparative isolation of Palo Alto would make it quite important that a reference library of some dimensions should be available at the opening of the first department. I finally wrote this view to Senator Stanford, at Washington, with an offer to make such collection of books, here

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this side of the Atlantic. Without doubt I could get more attention and assistance from European librarians, if I can approach them as an American librarian. If, therefore, it should seem probably that I can be most useful to the University in the librarianship, it might be more advantageous to appoint me Librarian than Agent of the Library.

I amy not have touched the points that you or Senator Stanford would most care to have me speak of, but I will not venture to take up your time further with my random thoughts. I wanted you to know more of my views on this subject than I feel at liberty to write to the Senator while a complete stranger. If this letter, or anything it contains, should be wanted, you will know it. If testimonals or references should be desired

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in Europe, as should constitute a good library nucleus in the leading departments of science and literature - claiming, at the same time, to have the language and the experience necessary to the proper discharge of such a commission.

To this suggestion and offer, the Senator replied that his arrangements are not sufficiently advanced to act upon my suggestion, but that he will bear the matter in mind for future consideration. I trust congressional duties will not so completely drive this subject from his mind, but that the very first week of his vacation may suggest it again. Whenever he considers it, he will probably consult with you; and, to save the time of exchanging letters at great distance, I will here give you some of my views on practical points, in advance of your asking them.

I have before me a published letter of

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7) Finally, the training of a few cataloguers, and the making of complete catalogues by author, title and subject, with suitable cross-references, and the numbering, labeling and shelving of the books.

That all this could easily cover several years, is a matter of course. But, this being the case, it becomes important to take the first step in season to bring about duly whatever may be regarded as essential to any given stage of the development of the University.

That I am willing to undertake, toward the accomplishment of this design modified as the event may dictate, whatever can be done in the time available, you are already aware. If it should seem best

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Dr. Newman upon "The Stanford University". It was written last January just after spending a few days in the family of Senator Stanford, at Washington, and thus possesses a semi-official character. In it the Doctor says, "The hope is now entertained that within the next two years students will be admitted." And again, "It is to be a university proper, with academic and collegiate departments, and a school of technology. There will be a post-collegiate course, and the alumni will have the advantages of the university lectures and degrees."

Though the Doctor here manifests a little lack of familiarity with the standard nomenclature of the higher education in the United States, yet he gives a few hints of some value and importance.

For instance, when he says, "within the well

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