Wesley C. Sawyer

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1885, Dec. 22: heard of conspiracy to exterminate Chinese in California; would like a position with the university; 1886, April 14: thoughts on university library's needs, Sawyer family history being written; 1887, June 6: working on his book, planning to come to California



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will give me time to learn whether I get a call from Palo Alto, as well as to look over the attractions of your wonderful state. My father-in-law is already on his way to San Jose, and I intend to join him there soon, and explore the part of your coast lying between San Francisco and San Diego.

Of course, I shall take the liberty to call on you when in San Francisco.

With thanks for your kindness, I remain very respectully

W. C. Sawyer

Last edit about 4 years ago by hannahb25
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GOV. SAWYER.

Formally Elected by the New Hampshire Legislature - Other Officers.

CONCORD, N. H., June 1, 1887. The fifth biennial session of the Legislature began this forenoon. Both branches met at 11 o'clock, and the oath of office was administed to the members by Gov. Currier. The Senator organized by choosing Frank D. Currier, president; Ira A. Chase, clerk; Charles J. Hamblet, assistant clerk; Edward H. Wasson, sergeant-at-arms, and James M. Adams, messenger. Notice was sent to the House that vacancies existed in senatorial districts 9, 12 and 17.

In the House, the roll-call showed all members present but three. John J. Bell of Exeter was chosen speaker. Organization was then effected by choosing Alvin Burley of Plymouth, speaker; George A. Dickey, clerk; Stephen S. Jewett, assistant clerk; Lewis Jenkins, sergeant-at-arms; Hiram E. Currier, George W. Varnum, Horace L. Ingalls, door keepers. The hours of meeting were fixed at 10 A. M. and 3 P. M. The rules of last session were adopted. The officers of both branches are all Republicans.

Both branches met in joint convention this afternoon, and filled vacancies in the senatorial districts, by electing Edmund E. Truesdell of Pembroke, in district No. 9; Charles H. Looney of Milton in No. 12, and Edward O. Blunt of Nashua in No. 17. All three are Republicans.

The ballot for Governor resulted as follows: Thomas Cogswell of Gilmanton, Democrat, 146; Charles H. Sawyer of Dover, Republican, 178. Mr. Sawyer was declared elected. A committee of one senator and two representatives was appointed to inform him of his election and to say that the Legislature awaited any communication he desired to make. Tuesday was designated as the day for drawing seats in the House. The sergeant-at-arms was directed to allow Gen. Gilman Marston of Exeter and Hon. Samuel B. Page of Haverhill to draw seats prior to that date. The Legislature then adjourned.

Governor-elect Sawyer will be inaugurated tomorrow forenoon. There will be a procession of the entire state militia, with several independent military companies and a large number of distinguished invited guests.

Last edit about 4 years ago by hannahb25
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Death of a Seaman from a Fish-Hook Wound.

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[ SPECIAL DISPATCH TO THE BOSTON HERALD ]

GLOUCHESTER. June 1, 1887. Schooner Jamestown, owned by George Steele, sailed from this port March 31 on a codfishing voyage to the Western Banks, and since that time nothing has been heard from her, and consequently her ownders today give her up as lost, as it is throught she must have floundered in the great gale of April 26, which swept over the banks. She carried a crew of 12 men, who had sailed many voyages from this port to the banks. George Curtis, her master, was a pative of Maine, and one of the most experienced skippers that ever sailed from here. He leaves a widow and family residing in Salem. Johnston Robinson, cook, leaves a widow and familly in East Boston. The the crew George W. Hartford belonged in Gerogeand two children in this city; ALexander and Charles McLeod, brothers, and John Matheson were natives of St. Anne's, C.B.; Thomas Daly and Morris Frost, belonging in Argyle, N. S., and George Melanson and Bradford Deveau of Plympton, N. S., were all single; Daniel Welsh leaves a widow in this city. The Jamestown was a fine vessel, built at Essex in 1876. She measured 6555 tones, and was insured in the Gloucester Mutual Fishing Insurance Company for $4125 on the vessel and outfits. Schooner Annie Wesley arrived from the Grand banks this evening, and Capt. Thorpe reports that on May 23 John Fowler, one of the crew died on board from the effects of sticking a fish hook in his hand, causing blood poisoning. He was buried at sea. He belonged n this city and was 27 years of age and unmarried. -----------NO COKE TO WORK WITH ---

Last edit almost 4 years ago by giulianaangotti
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