6

OverviewTranscribeVersionsHelp

Facsimile

Transcription

Status: Needs Review

STANFORD UNIVERSITY
DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY
STANFORD UNIVERSITY, CALIFORNIA
(5) [note should have been (6)]

British would probably refuse to accept. However, in these
wonderful days of democracy, unless we possess an
efficient and unrepresentative parliaments, we are
[oblete?] and therefore inferior.

Among this [more?] important of social concepts, we may
point out individualism and familism. In the West the
individual constitutes the social unit while in
the East the family takes its place. Here seems to exist
another apparent gulf. But now in the East individualism
is recognized to much larger a degree so as to
obviate the traditional line of demarcation
between the social concepts of the West and the East.

41 * (+) In ethical theories we note that so far as this
general conception of right and wrong is concerned,
we fail to see the fundamental difference. An
ethical man in the West is an ethical man in the
East. In China he is called a [Kungtso?], in Japan a
[Kunshi?], now changed to [shuishi?] and, a gentelman in England.
A man thus characterized possesses qualities that make
him a gentleman whether in China, in Japan or in England

Notes and Questions

Nobody has written a note for this page yet

Please sign in to write a note for this page