FWF TO EEI 10201917

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FWF TO EEI 10201917

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FwFarris Rue Raymound Paris France SSU ID

Miss Edna Esther Ingels 4423 Camero Ave Hollywood Calif USA

Last edit over 4 years ago by catslover
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Sat [deleted]Sept[deleted] Oct 20, 1917

At home- which will be in Albania only two days more. It is definitely planned now - as nearly definitely as anything can be in these turbulent times - that we are to leave [K?] on Monday and Tuesday for France and way stations. Since writing several days ago from the post near Lake O - strange things have happened. We have been keeping store in our house here at home. We had an Albanian entertainment in our honor. I was in a night attack the night after I wrote to you. I have had two days of real [repose?]! All of which are strange things. And I received your letter of Sept 3. Which was not strange, but was a surprise, for I thought that our mail must have been held by this time at Paris for us. Wouldn't it be unspeakable if they should send your box of sweets and it should arrive the day after I leave? It is torture to imagine such a thing. --

Everything in its place.

I was interrupted in addressing your envelope several times that night. Things happened all at once, you see. I put the envelope into the machine

Last edit over 2 years ago by Ganne
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and a tap at the window and a whispery voice asked where he should move the malades to. He thot I was the Chef de Medicine. I wrote your name and there entered a breathless brancardier asking for essence for the projecter. I gave him some from Harry F's voiture and came into the house again. On the lake I saw several shining objects. Harry and Clint and I watched them gleam in the light of the searchlights (projecter) which was stationed near us by the water's edge. I came into the room and we speculated about the possibility of the enemy's boats coming up. It was a rainy black night. The other fellows went to bed again and I finished addressing your envelope just in time to see a frantic eyed face - and whiskery - appear with a "sh-sh!" and speak, to me excitedly. I said (whispering) "Comment!" He flapped his arms and I knew he meant to blow out my light - which I did in the same breath with my "Comment". After that we watched the lake and lay down on our beds alternately. There were ten awkward sailing craft - a sort of raft - and two steam launches of Austrians on the lake - and no essence for the projecter but what we could furnish. We emptied all our reserve cans and Harry's machine, and

Last edit over 4 years ago by catslover
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watched the enemy approach. The wind was with them. Our house was within 100 feet of the lake's edge, where company after company of French and Senegalais formed a skirmish line. Orders were given in hushed voices. We were surrounded by Senegalais sentinals and could not go to our voitures without being accosted. Harry was dressing and wanted his automatic. While Clint talked with a sentinel (who could understand neither French or English, and therefore nothing that Clint said, except "American") I got the revolver. What he would have done with it I don't know. I left mine where it was. The "75s" on the hill behind us fired constantly and the shells whanged over our heads and burst far out over the fleet. There were no star shells, for they would have illuminated the beach where our soldiers were [fe?ing]. All we could see were the dark forms of soldiers in front of us and the gleams of the search lights on the sails as it swept from one side of the lake to the other - the flashes of the cannon and bursting shells. All we could hear was the purr of the little motor that ran the projecter, the shuffle of feet on the pebbly beach, the commands in undertone, and the report of the explosions & prolonged cry of the shells passing over. I went to bed and slept in snatches, and then soundly. In the morning we learned that the wind changed about 10:30 at night and the Boche returned without firing a shot.

Last edit over 4 years ago by catslover
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When I came to L - where our relay post was, and where most of the detatchment stood - I found the fellows jubilant. The Frenchmen had come to take our places, and we were to leave for France on the 20th (today). That was definite. Excited talk in circles, about what we'd do in Paris, and what we would sell, for we are to be limited as to baggage and the probable duration of the war! - The Frenchmen are not too efficient and we have had to make some runs since. There is an attack now in progress, and if the French [divers?] can't handle the job, we may have to stay awhile to carry [blessis?]. I think not, however, for the preparations in the way of troops and guns and ammunitions have been too great to make prolonged resistance seem possible - judging by the last attack by the French. - - I have sent you two packages. One on the 18th with a pair of opingas shoes that the Albanians wear, which I think will fit your petits pieds and another on the 19th, a Turkish cap, which the dealer said was for women, but which a Turk friend of mine said was for children as well. They ought to arrive before Christmas. But packages are slower than letters. Also, I'm going to send you some more snaps in this letter. I am having excellent success with my best pocket

Last edit over 4 years ago by catslover
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