Volume 03: Letters of John Macarthur to his sons, 1815-1832

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proceeding with most praise worthy caution - united with firmness - and unbound industry in his endeavour to acquaint himself with the real state of the County, and with the characters of the people over whom he is appointed to govern. He has an Aegean Stable to cleanse, but never was I so mistaken in man, if he do not completely accomplish the task, unless a change of favorment with you should deprive him of its confidence and regard.

I trust this will not be the case for never have we had a Governor before

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217

capable of discovering, appreciating and drawing forth the resources of the Colony.

Use every effort to make known by opinion wherever it can be of use _ do any thing within your power to make the existing Government whoever my be the members of it _ that Governor Bonham's removal would be a most unhappy event for us all.

A little time must develop his scheme of Govt. more fully and clearly show his capacity to discharge the duties of a most difficult office

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with equal honor to himself and advantage to us all. I have only one fear, which is that unchecked as his authority is, then continued indulgence of the Circean Cap of power may intoxicate and lead him into such.

We will, however, hope that his good sense will secure him against the mischevious effects of the intoxicating draught.

We are all in pretty good health and everything is prosperous about us.

All desire their most affect Remembrances Believe me My dear Edward Your ever Affectionate Father John Macarthur

Parramatta 11th. April 1832.

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No. 284 219 Parramatta June 5th, 1832 My dear dear Edward I sit down, or more properly speaking were up at the early hour of four in the morning to write you a hurried Letter for it must be dispatched in an hour by a special messaging to be in time to go by O'clock. who takes his papers in a ship, which is expected to sail at day light - It has been my intention for some days past to commence writing very fully on the various inportant subjects which now occupy the attention of all who have capacity, or inclination to think: but many unexpect-ted important affairs have so completely occupied my whole time, and so deeply engaged my attention, that I have been unable to perform what I [indecipherable] anxiously desired to do - not to waste the few precious minutes that are now left to me, by useless explanations of the causes of & such an interuption, I shall at once proved to [indecipherable] years, what [indecipherable] to most anxious first to knowthat my health has improve to a degree that I have again expected, in so much, that I am enabled to attend to every minute of our extended interests, and to inspect the progress of all ordinary business, as well as o devote a large portion of my time to many great improvements, that are here in many instances con -tained, and in [indecipherable] many meditate on much up [indecipherable]

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