Volume 03: Letters of John Macarthur to his sons, 1815-1832

ReadAboutContentsHelp

Pages

FL13033805
Complete

FL13033805

Provisions to exchange for the Rams they would attract a high Price – and the Provisions be applied to the supply of the Govts Dependants – that the more wealthy Farmers would pay money with which Govt. might give premiums, or apply it to discharge the expense of any object of fullest utility – say the expense of a seminary for the Education of Youth –

The Commissioner started many objections which I endeavoured to remove – the principal one seemed to be the quantity of Land I should acquire – You may ask, said he, for the exclusive use of 50,000 Acres, but I see that you look to the perpetual Grant in payment for your Rams – I answered why should I not – Is there any just reason why a respectable Family, consisting of seven children should not possess 7,000 Acres of Land each in a New Colony, which will be enriched by the execution of their Parent – Look at your present system – How many acres does Mr. D'arcy Wentworth own? – nearly 40,000 it is understood by grant and mortgage

Last edit 12 months ago by ghgormley
FL13033806
Complete

FL13033806

How many Mr. Terry (a common thief and receiver who was flogged out of the Town of Parramatta a few years ago for robbing hen roosts and as a common nuisance) and others of the like description – 18 or 20,000 Acres – (upwards of a 1000 is by grant from the Governor to himself as a mark of esteem) and is not every clever active scoundrel in the Colony becoming the proprietor of large Estates – and must not all the small Estates that are bestowed upon the hand of the Prisoners finally centre in such vile characters? The American Government, who have now been accused of want of sagacity, make no Objection to any mans possessing a million of acres if he have the money to pay for them nay they will credit for a considerable portion of the purchase money – Why then should it be objected that I am liking to obtain 50,000 acres for which I am willing to pay in an article of public benefit, and on the sale of which a large profit will arise?

Last edit 12 months ago by Portia
FL13033807
Incomplete

FL13033807

The Commissioner seemed to be connced at last, and said he really saw no objections - and he Desired me to give him the heads of our conversation in a written memorandum - I send you a Copy of what I wrote for him - it was very hastily done (late in the Evening before he embarked) and, I now perceive, does not contain all the reasons I raised in Conversation. In the fervour of our debate, he dropped - "Consider the prejudice governments entertain against you, I own it is not a deserved one, but 'tis an obstacle - " I replied that your late communications encouraged me to hope that the prejudice to which he alluded no longer exists. - Well, he said "I wish it may be so, but I fear" - If they do continue I rejoined and to the extent of rejecting my proposal, it will be for you Sir to consider in what way the object which I have so successfully founded may be made a national one - In that case I, of course am out of the question, I must endeavour to take care of myself - and it will not be expected that holding some trumps in my hand, I shall resign them to others to play - "Government can import Merino Sheep" - I admit they can, but let us calculate the expense and will - I shall next year have nearly 3000 breeding Ewes all fine enough to breed Rams. - and even that number will not supply Rams enough for the whole of the settlement if spirited plans be adopted - Suppose Govt. were to import 3000 Merino Ewes and a proportion of Rams

This page is incompleteEdit this page
Last edit 12 months ago by ghgormley
FL13033808
Complete

FL13033808

What would they cost? - First price - freight, food, and Risk, at least 60,000 pounds and when imported, if you contrast the price at which English bred Merino Wool sells with the price mine sold at the last Sales, probably much inferior in the quality of their wool, and certainly so well calculated to flourish in this Climate, and on our peculiar pasturage as Sheep bred in the Colony - Very true, said the Commissioner, but yet I fear there will be objections - I told him that I had spoken to the Governor upon the subject, but that he had declined taking any steps himself, but promised if I sent him my plan he would recommend it at home - Do so then said the Commissioner - On mature reflection I have declined doing so, for in the first instance I have no faith in his Excellency, and in the second, I am of opinion that any project from home would have little favourable notice unless it had the support of the Commissioner - For my doubts of the Governor I have many reasons, but as I have no desire to increase the prejudices against him I will not detail them - I leave it to your own discretion to mention this business in Downing Street or not - to judge of the forty year long [indecipherable] on these is impossible - If you do speak of it - the chief points to inform on - that this Colony must continue an increasing burthen until exports are found; for without exports what have we to pay for our supplies but the money expended by Government - That no export has yet been discovered, the produce of our soil, but Wool (a few hides excepted and a very little Tallow) that the increasing excellence of its quality makes it

Last edit 11 months ago by Portia
FL13033809
Complete

FL13033809

of importance to our cleaner pastures, and affords a fair prospect that it may be still more improved – That the new discoveries of luxuriant pastures to the South West of the Cow Pastures admit of our flocks being increased to an amazing extent – That by my means, Rams may be soon had to improve all the Flocks without any actual cost, and Govt. receive in return for them a considerable price – That from my flocks, they will always be sure of an improved state, which will advance their general improvement – That Govt. must take spirited measures to push this object forward, as, whatever may be said to the contrary, the Colonists in general are very supine – and will continue so, as long as they can find in Govt. ready purchasers for their Grain and Stock – That as long as this system continues there can be no relief in point of expense – That at present there are not Ten Sheep breeders pursuing any measures for the improvement of Wool – and not more than Six of these that pasture judicious ones – The practice is to breed from their own cross bred Rams, by which means, after their Sheep are arrived at a certain point of improvement they degenerate again – This would be obviated if Govt. took all the Rams I may need off my hands & distributed them – many do not like to apply to me because they have always scoffed at the project from its commencement – some are led by their neighbours – others have so many to spare. You will understand that any settler of any character has always a Pig or two, one Bullock or some Grain which he could give Gov. in exchange for a Ram, tho' he cannot at all times dispose of them for money, in which case he could come to me to purchase – and many will not move unless in a hurry –

When the Commissioner returns he will have had time to give the subject due consideration, and he will have convened with Lt Govr. Sorell of whose abilities all speak in praise, and he is a zealous advocate for the Merino Sheep – But I am really apprehensive, the Commissioner will

Last edit 11 months ago by Portia
Displaying pages 21 - 25 of 230 in total