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In war all spoils were brought to him, who divided
them among his men after having reserved the
best for himself. The men of the tribe were under
an obligation to provide the head man with food
and to make all kinds of presents to him such
as Kangaroo and opossum rugs, stone tomahawks
spears, flint knives +c.
The Gournditch Mera did not in war eat any
part of the slain.
Although there was no individual property in land
such things as were left by the deceased were divided
among his nearest relatives.
Game killed in the chase was divided amongst
those present. [crossed out - The hunter gave] Supposing a Kangaroo
to have been killed, the hunter gave one hind
leg and the breast to his most esteemed friend
and kept the other hind leg himself. The
remainder was divided among the other companions.
There was however no rule as to the distribution
of cooked food in the camp, for all eat to
gether - that is each family did so. Each wife
was however obliged to sit beside her own husband
nor near any other man unless her husband
sate between them. Each family camped by
itself.
The Gournditch Mera believed that the spirits
of the deceased father or grandfather occasionally
visited the male descendants in dreams
and imparted to them charms (songs) against
disease or against witchcraft.
There were also among them persons who

[in side margin]
Buckley the man who
lived 32 years with the
blacks at Port Phillip says
in his narrative: p 57
They have a notion that the
world is supported by
props, which are in the
charge of a man who lives
at the farthest end of the
earth. They were dreadfully
alarmed on one occasion
by news passed from tribe
to tribe, that unless they
could send him a supply
of tomahawks for cutting
some more props with,
and some more rope to
tie them with, the earth
would go by the sun
and all kinds be smothered.

Have the Mera any
knowledge of this?Their
[crossed out - head m] chief might it
seems to me have been
such a man as would
send the message - calling
for tribute.

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