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{Tharan-galk-bek?] (1) or the Gumtree -country. It was described to me as a land
where there were trees. The tribal legends also speak of it, as the
place to which Bunjil ascended with his people in a whirlwind (p -).

With the Kurnai this place is called blinte-da-nurk or
freely translated "bright sky of the cloud", also bring-a nurt or
"bone-of-the-cloud".

[Left hand column]
(1) {Tharan-galk?] is
Eucalyptus Viminalis
galk = wood or tree
bek = country

The Ngarigo called the sky Kūlŭmbi, and said that on the other
side there was another country with trees and rivers. This
belief was also held by the Theddora and Woigal.
( other [?] come in here).

$ The human [Kunacks?] spirit, ghosts &ct. [underlined]

[Left hand margin] Dieri here from p 9
add [with?] [?] [say?]

It is thought by the Dieri that when anyone dies his spirit
goes up to the [Pirri-wilping?], the sky, but also that it can roam about the
earth invisibly. *If the deceased was a person of any influence food
is placed for many days, and in winter months a fire is lighted,
so that the ghost may warm himself at it. The ground round the grave
is carefully swept, and they believe that on it they can see the
footsteps of the deceased. The kind of inquest held on the deceased
is described at p , also shows quite clearly that the spirit of
the deceased is supposed to be present and able to point out the
person who is guilty of his death by magic. Should the food at the
grave not be touched, it is supposed that the deceased is not hun
gry.* They also think that the spirit can establish themselves in
ancient trees and always [speak?] of [much?] with reverence, and are
careful that they are not cut down or burned.

[Left hand margin - transpose ** to p 17a]

The [Warriayeri?} thought that the spirits of the dead
went up to the sky, [Wai-irre-warra?].

The belief of the [Biandik? or Bakandi?] was [?] [?] are spirits in mankind,
which they called [no-one?]. At [?] one went [downward?] into the sea,
and would remain a whiteman (1). The other went into cloudland". They
said that the [?] [?] go "up there" [ikan-marn? or ikan nuarn?], where everything
is to [be?] [found?] [?] [?] [?] [?] [?] [fat?] kangaroo [?] [said?] [to?]
be like a kangaroo of the clouds" (1)
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
(2) The [Biandik? or is this Bakandi?] tribe of South Australian Aborigines by Mrs Jane
Smith/Smith
related in 1830.
(1) She is ending a belief [integrated?] [?] which now - but see p. p .

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