XM593_ICDMS_lowres

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Bunjil is also the Eaglehawk, but - nowhere is there the [confusion?] of [?] [?] [?] or of nature which is found in the [?] via the tribal legend. Bunjil is represented as an old blackfellow, the benign [words crossed out] or head man of the tribe. [crossed out - He lived and He had] His two wives who were [gunawara?] ([Blacktown?]) and according to [some?] accounts his [son?] is Biribial -(the Rainbow). Other accounts are that [space left in text] was his son. [crossed out - A legend ?] He [crossed out - also] is a son of [?] [crossed out - gives] [?] the master of the Kulin then also of life and [-] a legend reminds him in the distant past when the Kulin intermarried [word crossed out] regard [to?] class distinction in the [restriction?] of relationship, he gave his [sisters?] to the medicine men who had, consulted him that the people should [?] themselves [?] [?] parts, "Bunjil in this so the and [?] in that side"., [in this?] accounting for the [division?] of the comment [?] [?] two the [exogamies?] intermarrying [?] interests relate to Kulin marriage.

[Crossed out Finally?] Another Bunjil legend recounts from Bunjil [?] up to them & they all then call his people, [?] ["siris?"] the legend says, in a whirlwind which the [murk ain?] (Beliac believe) had [tied?] up in a [skin?] [bag?].

There they remain as the pointed [?] of the old men [for the?] crossed out - young] boys. A significant instance is that of Berak. When he was a boy "before [his ?] whiskers began to grow" his mother brother took him out of the camp at night and pointing [?] with his spear thrower said "But that one is Bunjil - you see him and he sees you. commonlyBunjil was spoken of as "[Munya njain?]" that is "father-son" rather than of the others name. I have some [Bu?] question again. indicating "old man - [up there?]" to avoid [3 words crossed out] speaking [?] [?] Bunjil; -

One thing has struck me in [crossed out -these] this legend which [?] for this being namely the [preponderance?] in [crossed out - them] him of the anthropomorphic element. [crossed out - In the custom]

Usually the actors in these tales combine the humans [word crossed out] and animal element to completely tell one cannot tell where the legend and the [?] ends. But taking Bunjil as the example, he is in all cases the old blackfellow while [?]

[rest of page is unreadable]

Last edit about 1 month ago by ALourie
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When he was a boy "before his whiskers began to grow" he [?] [?] mothers brother took him out of the camp at night and pointing, [at?] a [star?] with his spearthrower said "See, that one is Bunjil - you will [look?] and he will see you: Commonly Bunjil was spoken of as "[Munya njain?]" that is "father-son" rather than of the other name. I have heard both use [?] [?] in relating "old man - up there" to avoid [3 words crossed out] speaking the word Bunjil: -

One thing that struck me in the legend which relate to this being namely the preponderances in [crossed out - them] him of the anthropomorphic element. [crossed out - In the custom] Usually the actors in these tales combine the human [word crossed out] and the animal elements to completely tell one cannot tell who was [Bunjil?] and the [?] side. But taking Bunjil as the [?], he is in all cases the old blackfellow.

[Cannot read line]

in the [bat?]. Yet Bunjil is in nature the Eaglehawk, his [son?] is the Rainbow, his brother is the star Antari Australis, thus all retaining a [?] character but with a [purpose?] human element.

[Left hand margin note] his two wives as [Blackmans?] one [?] [?] actors/actions?

[words crossed out - The kurnai legends tell how] (quote the bullroarer)

Among the Kurnai, under the influene of the teachings of the initiation ceremonies the [?] of the [?] all being then in the equivlent to "[Munyari njain?'" [crossed out - with the Kurnai] is restricted to the initiated men. + if [?] at the last [?] such ceremonies that then the [totem?] of the [?] or name and are these contained with little to [?] " when they go back" that is to the camp, which they have [?] and heard. There being - [crossed out - only Kurnai, with ?] no other name than "[Munyari njain?]" "our father". [Rest of line crossed out] [Line crossed out]

Left hand margin + note] The old woman knew that [?] is not [?] being [Munyari njain?]but -

This legend is that he went up to [the sky?] where he still is. [cannot read line] [?] the "[?]" and its ceremonies. His son is the [Jŭundūn?] the [Pupine?] [?] is this [manifested [?] came down at the ceremonies to make [the?] boys into men. One legend relates ([?] [?]) returning [words crossed out] where the [?] is seen ( [?] [?] them).

All I can say as to the belief of the [?] is [during?] from an old woman in [?] [?] woman, who when I said that who [?] replied " Are those about [?] is that he been up the [Murray?] and not he coming from walk a [?] [?] to make the boys not them/men. [cannot read rest of line]

The belief in [Daramutun?] the "[Biamban?]" [words crossed out] the ([?]) to [Biamban?] is common and to this tribe is which alluded at the tribal [?].

The teaching to [Daramutuin?] are

Last edit about 1 month ago by ALourie
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[Rock art with circles and human figures]

These [?] external [?] [?] who to the north and from the Wiradjuri (?) where [?]

[Under art, first 3 lines crossed out]

Last edit about 1 month ago by ALourie
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[Typed text]

Last edit 4 months ago by Christine
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These beliefs in the customs of the human [crossed out - most of line] at the death I have from them very [in?ful?], [?] by unusual, any the [central?] native tribes. The [Murup Yanth?] - a [?] - - - is whether he is

Last edit 4 months ago by Christine
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