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of the Buthera-balluk (1), whoheard what was to take place, and had
followed the Meymet down from the Goulburn River, came running up and
went in between the two parites shouting "Enough! Enough! ", and turning
to the Meymet said, "You should now go back to your own country". This
stopped the spear throwing, they had had blood, and all were now again
friends, and a great corrobbory was held that night.

Buckley gives an account of a somewhat similar case which hap
pened in his tribe, the Wudthurung, and which is worth quoting in this
connection (2).

In speaking of an elopmenet he says, of the ordeal which
followed it "at length this young man advanced towards us, and challenged
our men to fught, and offer whcih was aceptedpractically by a boomer
ang being thrown at him and which grazed his leg. A spear was then
thrown but he warded it off cleverly with his shield. He made no return to
this until one of our men advanced very near to him, with
only a shield adn waddy (3), and then the two went to work in good earnest,
until the first had his shield split, so that he had nothing to defend
himself with but his waddy. His opponent took advantage of this and
struck him a tremendous blow on one side of the head, and knocked him
down; but instantly on his legs aagain, the blood however flowing
very freely over his back and shoulders. His friends then cried out "enough"
and threatened general hostilities if another blow was struck. This having
the desired effect they all, soon after separated quietly.

As a good instance of the manner in which trespasses by
one of one tribe on the country of another tribe was dealt with, I take
the case of a man of the Wudthurung, tribe who unlawfully took, infact
stole stone from the tribal quarry at Mt.Macedon. I give it in almost the

(1) The Buthera-balluk lived about Seymour, and were Kulin.
(3} this word waddy does not belong to the Woeworung language, nor to
the Wudthurung so far as I have been able to learn, but it is a word
from one of the dilects near Sydney, and its in Buckley's book by
Morgan shows how quickly such words are carried from one place to
another by the whitemen andtheir blackboys, to the confusion of philologists

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