XM702_ICDMS_lowres Notes about Camping and Food Division

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K + K here p 208 customs Regulating camp. Kurnai 4 In the camp [the- crossed out] custom regulates the position of the individual. The husband and wife would sleep on the left side of the fire, the latter behind it, and close behind her the children; nearest to her the little boy if any, next to him the little girl. In the event of the man's father and mother being with them for a night, the grandfather would occupy the right handside, the grandmother behind him further back in the hut and the son's wife and children would move to a correspondng position near their own “house father”.

It would be a rule that the wife’s sister, although called ‘wife’ by her brother in law, and also calling him “husband” would not sleep in his hut but somewhere near at hand. Other rules would apply to other members. A “brogan” visiting him that is a man who had been initiated at the same time as the above mentioned “husband” and who therefore addressed the wife as “spouse” and was so addressed by her would not stay at [the - crossed out] this camp but would go and stop in the young men’s camp.

Such rules also obtained among the Maneroo tribe.

Camping Rules 3 Kurnai quote from K + K p208 Not only did custom regulate the distribution of cooked food among the members of the group to which it was common, but it also [strictly -crossed out] defined in the old times the positions which might be occupied by the various members [of the - crossed out] in the camp.

From the statement of the Kurnai [and - crossed out] from diagrams made by them on the ground + from observation of the position of the camps respectively in encapments - [I have - crossed out] I can say that the position of the respective members are well understood and observed.

The following are the positions fixed by Kurnai when I had an imaginary encampment marked out to comprise the several individuals mentioned below. The starting point is the camp of the son of the princicpal man of of [sic] the group, the Gweraeil Kurnai or Headman and his wife. The directions are given approximately by compass bearings and the distance by paces. The nature of the ground required that the encampment should extend in a particular direction and the situation was chosen with due respect to drainage and shelter.

Son and son's wife 5 paces north Father and mother 20 paces n. 30ᵒ E.

Last edit 3 months ago by ALourie
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and was so addressed by her would not stay at [the - crossed out] this camp but would go and stop in the young men’s camp.

Such rules also obtained among the Maneroo tribe.

Camping Rules 3 Kurnai quote from K + K p208 Not only did custom regulate the distribution of cooked food among the members of the group to which it was common, but it also [strictly -crossed out] defined in the old times the positions which might be occupied by the various members [of the - crossed out] in the camp.

From the statement of the Kurnai [and - crossed out] from diagrams made by them on the ground + from observation of the position of the camps respectively in encapments - [I have - crossed out] I can say that the position of the respective members are well understood and observed.

The following are the positions fixed by Kurnai when I had an imaginary encampment marked out to comprise the several individuals mentioned below. The starting point is the camp of the son of the princicpal man of of [sic] the group, the Gweraeil Kurnai or Headman and his wife. The directions are given approximately by compass bearings and the distance by paces. The nature of the ground required that the encampment should extend in a particular direction and the situation was chosen with due respect to drainage and shelter.

Son and son's wife 5 paces north Father and mother 20 paces n. 30ᵒ E. Brother and brother's wife 20 paces N 60ᵒ E Wife's father and mother 100 paces or more E Wife's brother and wife near the last Father's sister + husband 10 paces South 30 E Mother's sister and husband 10 paces S- 60ᵒ E Mother's brother's son + wife 20 paces south

In this example the relative places and distances are not of course intended to convey that those directions and these number paces would in all case be followed, but as indicating a case [in - crossed out] which might occur and which is an example of the general rule. It is necessary to point out that the term translated as father's sister's husband would also include mother's brother's wife - the relative positions of these persons would therefore be the same.

Last edit 3 months ago by ALourie
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Wolgal Camping Rule [in side margin] The grandparents would occupy places as follows Father’s father left hand side of fire " mother right " " " The maternal grandparents would not in any case occupy a place in their sister-in-laws camp but would make a camp for themselves behind that of the son-in-law.

A father would never stay in a young mens camp unless he were travelling – “brewit” that is “unmarried” or “young man” – i.e without his wife – for in such a case he would stay in the main encampment. Married people and young men have separate encampments. Bulmer for me.

Wolgal (Bulmer) Game [in side margin]

The food was divided as among the Maneroo blacks where a married man caught a kangaroo or other large game he sent the whole to his father’s camp and would himself eat small game, but if he had no other meat his father would send him the head and part of the backbone. His wife would have to rely upon her relatives for a share of their meat, or perhaps the share to which by customs she was entitled to. Bulmer.

Yuin Game [in side margin] There was no rule as to sharing game, but if a man had more than he wanted he would give the excess to some relative or friend; to his parents for instance he might send his wife with some to her parents. But he was not obliged to do so unless he liked. Nor was there any rule where he should place his camp in the general encampment excepting that he must not put it near his wife’s mother’s camp. When people arrived they pitched the their camp on the side from whence [they] came. Ienbin.

Last edit 28 days ago by ALourie
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2 Kulin With the Woeworung [a camp was made- crossed out] people fixed their camps as [follows - crossed out] serve all in the following manner, taking Berak's "wilam" (hut) as the starting point.

[Diagram] (1) Berak wife + child (2) Berak's brother ditto (3) Berak's father + mother (4) Berak wife's father + mother (5) Visitors from the Būnurung Tribe (6) young men's camp

The camp to suppose to be in Berak's country, say at Heidelberg. Each hut faces the East That of the parents of Berak's wife are behind a screen of boughs. [and having - crossed out] The hut of [Wille- crossed out] Berak's father between. The Bunurung people camp on that side nearest to their country which is to the southward. The IIII III and young men furthest from the married peoples' huts.

Last edit 27 days ago by ALourie
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[written sideways in centre of page] Ipai Kubbi

B4 Kabbitha A1 Ipai

B3 Matha A2 Kumbo

M B4 Kubbi

Last edit 5 months ago by ALourie
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