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15
in a commotion. The women started up and
hastily seizing their rolled up rugs and blankets hastened off with
their children to a space in front of the camp on the
north side, singing the Boy's song, which as I have already said
is intended to cause the tooth to come out [crossed out - readily] easily
in the initiation. Meanwhile the men were stalking
about among the camps, shouting Ha! Waugh! (usually
pronounced Wah! or even Woh!) - commanding
silence among the women. In a very short time all
these with the children were huddled into a close
group surrounded by the men who were stamping a dance,
to the word "Wah", finally closing in round the women
each one silently raising the right hand pointing upwards
to the sky. This silent gesture signified the word Daramūlŭn
which it is not lawful to utter there. A singular feature
now showed itself. In the camp were two or three of
the Biduelli men and one of the Krauatun Kurnai,
with their wives and children. When the ceremonie [sic]
commenced these men with one exception, had gone away
because they had never been "made men" - for as I have
said before neither the Krauatun clan nor the
Biduelli tribe had any initiation ceremonies of their own, nor
did they as a rule attend those of neighouring tribes. The
one man who remained was the old patriarch of the Biduelli
who was now driven crouching among the women and
children. The reason was self-evident. He had never
been "made a man" and was therefore no better than a
mere boy.

The women and children being driven together
the old men proceeded to draw from those boys who
were considered ripe for initiation. The proper time is when the
whiskers are beginning to show themselves and when the old
men observe that the boy is beginning to pay more attention to the
women of the tribe than is discreet or proper. The old men
pointed out those who were to be taken and they were seized by
their "Kabo's" and placed crouching in the immediate
front rank of the women. There was one boy a half caste
indeed he was nearer white than black about whom opinion

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