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Tatathi
Initiations. 2

the boys.

That evening or the next evening the men took
the boys back to the camp to show them to their
mothers. The women stood in a row. All the men
came up in a crowd with the boys hidden in their
midst. A fire had been lighted of green boughs
and on this the boys stood covered by a rug, and
each put his fingers into his nostrils to prevent himself
being smothered. Then each ngierep took his boy
and placed him in front of his mother, so that she could
see him, and then immediately drew him back into the
crowd. All the boys having been thus shown, the
men took them away to the bush where the boys
remained for five weeks with all the young men, who
took care of them, instructed them, amused them,
and fed them (with water and grubs). After this the
boys still remained away for a time and were only
allowed to eat the males of opossums.

This should follow the Wiradjuri ceremonies and add
this.

This account of the initiations of the Tatati, Wati Wati
& Litchi Litchi raises this particular type of ceremonies
across [the - crossed out] New South Wales from Sydney to near Wentworth.

It appears to have been peculiar to tribes of NSW but
to have been participated in by the [River - crossed out] Victorian tribes on
the south side of the Murray River - that is among the
northern tribes of the Wotjo nation - and the tribes
which farther up the Murray River were situated between it and the
Kulin tribes.

Umbara the tribal bard of the Yuin in speaking to me
of the ceremonies of the tribe (see p-) These go all the way
down the Murray River on this side (stretching out his right
hand) but on that side - stretching on the left - there is nothing.

From what I shall now say of the ceremonies of the
Victorian tribes - Wotjoballuk and Kulin - my old friend Umbara
was [?informant?] and [??] for he had been down that river as far as [??]

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Ted Ryan

Paragraph near the bottom begins 'Bumbara the tribal bard of the Yuin …….down the Murray River on this side (stretching out his right hand; but on the left side, [??] on the left, there is nothing.
From what I shall [??] [??] of the ceremonies of the Victorian Tribes - Wotyoballuk and Kulin - my old friend Bumbara was [?] and wanted to know for he had been down left and [?] [?]

J Gibson

I think this is actually 'Umbara' - the Yuin elder also known as Merriman.

Ted Ryan

It may well be and if there is a published form of 'Umbara' let's go with that. Of course, the word shouldn't be starting with a vowel - but that's another matter.

J Gibson

Well, interesting you say that. Apparently 'Umbarra' was pronounced like 'Yumbarra' by elders in the Yuin community.