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AngelikaNorin at May 13, 2024 02:34 PM

7

7.

"A mission enables one to work with his hands untied, and untrammeled,
using his own best judgment, without interference on the part of outsiders.
It is a simple problem--not complex.

"The great needs for such a mission are:

"First: it relieves suffering men out of work, that is no fault of
their own in most cases. They are stranded and absolutely alone. They need
a helping hand to find health, to find work, to find God, and to find their
proper place in the social order.

"Second: so many people come to Florida, both tourist and transients,
one with money and the other without. They both have the same purpose in
that they are seeking 'life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.' The
tourist looks out for himself. The transient must have some one help him
on his way.

"Third: 'the poor are always with us' and there will always be room
for this kind of work.

"Fourth: sudden relief is greatly needed for seamen in Jacksonville.
Seamen are our second navy, our ambassadors of good will.

"All food is a contribution which I have promoted by contacting business
heads and organizations. We generally have sufficient food for all.

"I feel that in this mission work I am able to stop crime at its source
to a great extent. A hungry man will commit a crime quicker than a man that
has three regular meals each day. We are told that hunger is the greatest
human urge.

"I am convinced that the mission work has relieved the burden and gloom
from many a lonely, helpless, struggling soul. This is evidently true with
some men past 60. They say that cold harsh treatment makes men worse. And

1297

7

7.

"A mission enables one to work with his hands untied, and untrammeled,
using his own best judgment, without interference on the part of outsiders.
It is a simple problem—not complex.

"The great needs for such a mission are:

"First: it relieves suffering men out of work, that is no fault of
their own in most cases. They are stranded and absolutely alone. They need
a helping hand to find health, to find work, to find God, and to find their
proper place in the social order.

"Second: so many people come to Florida, both tourist and transients,
one with money and the other without. They both have the same purpose in
that they are seeking 'life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.' The
tourist looks out for himself. The transient must have some one help him
on his way.

"Third: 'the poor are always with us' and there will always be room
for this kind of work.

"Fourth: sudden relief is greatly needed for seamen in Jacksonville.
Seamen are our second navy, our ambassadors of good will.

"All food is a contribution which I have promoted by contacting business
heads and organizations. We generally have sufficient food for all.

"I feel that in this mission work I am able to stop crime at its source
to a great extent. A hungry man will commit a crime quicker than a man that
has three regular meals each day. We are told that hunger is the greatest
human urge.

"I am convinced that the mission work has relieved the burden and gloom
from many a lonely, helpless, struggling soul. This is evidently true with
some men past 60. They say that cold harsh treatment makes men worse. And

1297