Newspaper Clippings, 1883 - From Diary 56

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3-1-1883

3-1-1883

TERRITORIAL ENTERPRISE

Thursday.....March 1, 1883

DEATH OF HANK MONK.

A Veteran and Noted Stage-driver Ferried Over.

Hank Monk, the noted stage-driver, died at Carson yesterday morning at 11:30. Hank came to this coast in 1857 and began driving stage on the Placerville route. For some years past he has driven the stage between Carson and Lake Tahoe. The fright he gave Horace Greeley in driving him over the mountains to Placerville and his joke in connection therewith made Hank known all over the United States. Hank Monk was a dry joker as well as a first class stage driver, and was very fond of putting upon travelers wonderful stories of the mountains, the people the animals and the birds and fished thereof.

Deceased was born at Waddington, near Ogdensburg, New York, in 1828. He seems never to have been anything else than a stage driver. At all events since his advent on this coast he has always seemed out of place except when handling the ribbons of a spanking stage team. About his only failing was one that gave him more pain and trouble than it gave any one else. He was addicted to over indulgence in drink, particularly when off duty.

He had been failing for some time past and an attack of pneumonia hastened his departure. He died in a little cabin in which he had long resided, at Carson, [word "and" blacked out]

Last edit 2 months ago by Doten Diaries
3-2-1883

3-2-1883

TERRITORIAL ENTERPRISE

Saturday....March 3, 1883

FUNERAL OF HANK MONK.

The Last Rites — A Large Attendance — The Funeral Sermon.

The funeral of Hank Monk, the veteran stage-driver, took place at Carson yesterday afternoon from the Episcopal Church. The remains were placed in a handsome casket, which was decked with flowers.

The following gentlemen acted as pallbearers: Stephen T. Gage, Judge W. M. Cary (these two gentlemen were the committee to meet Horace Greeley in 1859, when the celebrated stage-driver carried him to Placerville), ex-Governor John H. Kinkead, A. D. Treadway, J. H. Martin and Thomas Condon.

The singing at the church was unusually fine.

THE FUNERAL SERMON

Was preached by Rev. George R. Davis, and was as follows:

During many years of my ministry in this city few sadder tasks have been allotted me than the one placed in my hands to-day.

Death brings to our minds many truths not realized before. How often do we lay away the body of some one highly honored in his life-time: we perform the last rites with due pomp and circumstance of detail, yet before we reach our homes we become aware of the fact that after all the man really deserved but little of the world, and despite his high station he was easily spared, and but little missed. Men cringed and fawned before him, and he is gone. Again, some simple-minded man, with but little of the world's goods, and hardly any of the blessing of life, disappears from our daily walks, and we are startled at realizing how much we feel his absence, and how much we lacked in a true appreciation of his merits while he lived.

The man who knows his own natural capacities and strives to occupy the position in life best suited to the gifts, however humble, which will result in the fullest measure of usefulness to his fellow man, is a man of brains and honest purpose. A man who strives to fill positions beyond his powers, is either a knave or a fool. How few of us have the good sense or modesty to know our place in life.

It is often through senseless ambition that ships are wrecked, that strong organizations are failures, that dynasties are wiped out. I hold that our friend lying before us filled his mission well. While with sure eye and steady hand he guided his human charges over the dangerous grades of the mountains, he was more serving his fellow men than some vain Prince overrating his capacities and leading an army into the jaws of useless destruction. Too much credit cannot be given one who follows an humble calling and takes an honest pride in doing his work well. I had the pleasure of an acquaintance with the deceased, and now, as we lay him away in Mother Earth, my mind recalls the pleasant journeys I had with him through the canyons and the solemn old pine forests of the Sierra. Beneath his rough exterior I found a sage and philosopher. He was a man of simple tastes and genial heart, and many of the throng who gather here to-day to pay the last tribute of respect and friendship pass from this sacred house realizing for the first time how much Hank Monk can be missed. His long exposures in the service of the public brought on bodily infirmities during the past few months of his life, which, perhaps, made death not unwelcome, and which calls to my mind the words of the poet Omar:

What, if the soul can fling the dust aside,

And naked on the air of Heaven ride,

Wer't not a shame—wer't not a shame for him

In this clay carcass crippled to abide?

And fear not least existence closing your

Account and mine, should know the like no more,

The Eternal Saki from the bowl has poured,

Millions of bubbles like us, and will pour

AMEN.

Last edit 2 months ago by Doten Diaries
3-22-1883

3-22-1883

The Old Colony Memorial.

PLYMOUTH,

THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 1883

$100,000,000 for the Bradfords.

Our readers are familiar with the romances of great fortunes in England seeking owners that appear now and then in the newspapers, but we do not remember to have met one connected with the Pilgrims of the Mayflower until now. We don't like to disappoint our Western cousins, but lest they become unduly elated we are constrained to inform them that there is quite enough of the Bradford stock remaining in Plymouth to absorb this little bagatelle, the last of the sixth generation from the Governor having passed away only within the last twelve month, in the one hundredth year of her age. The Memorial editor being an "heir" in the next generation, is of course a sharer in these "great expectations," but will hypothecate his claim for a reasonable sum with any of his Western relatives. But here is the story in full bloom, from the Springfield (Ohio) Globe:

The Bradford Family in Springfield, and Their Right to Share in an Enormous Fortune.

Readers of the Globe are probably familiar with the history of the celebrated Bradford fortune, amounting to $100,000,000, that now lies in the Bank of England, awaiting claimants this side of the ocean. The enormous wealth has been the subject of active litigation for a century. It represented the estate of Gov. Bradford, of Mayflower fame. The story of this great fortune is rather a simple one. Gov. Bradford received his great fortune from his second wife, Alice Carpenter, who in turn received her great wealth from her first husband, an English nobleman. The story of the courtship in England, the separation of Gov. Bradford and Miss Carpenter, and their subsequent meeting and marriage in America, when Gov. Bradford was a widower and his first live a widow, is familiar to every reader of history. This interesting revival of a well known story is a matter of more than usual interest. The wealth brought Gov. Bradford by his second wife was left by him at the time of his death unbequeathed. With that native honesty so characteristic of Englishmen, the property has been left untouched, and has increased to almost compound ratio, until it now almost equals the famous wealth of the Vanderbilts.

Of course there are numerous applicants to this mountain of gold. Five McIlrath brothers of Cleveland, closely related to Gov. Bradford, are aspirants to its possession. Mrs. Francis Hillar, of Lake county, is perhaps the nearest living blood heir to the great fortune. Numerous of her descendents will come in for a slice of the fortune. The Bradford family of this city are directly related to Gov. Bradford, and will make a strong fight for a share of the wealth. Mr. Almon Bradford, of South Charleston, has a bundle of parchment manuscript that directly details their relationship, and contains a history of the Bradford family from the landing of the Mayflower to the present time, demonstrating the family connection. An interesting fight may be expected, as efforts of the Bradfords are likely to be commensurate with the value of the objectOur readers are familiar with the romances of great fortunes in England seeking owners that appear now and then in the newpapers, but we do not remember to have met one connected with the Pilgrims of the Mayflower until now. We don't like to disappoint our Western cousins, but lest they become unduly elated we are constrained to inform them that there is quite enough of the Bradford stock remaining in Plymouth to absorb this little bagatelle, the last of the sixth generation from the Goverrnor having passed away only within the last twelve month, in the one hundredth year of her age. The Memorial editor being an "heir" in the next generation, is of course a sharer in these "great expectations," but will hypothecate his claim for a resonable sum with any of his Western relatives. But here is the story in full bloom, from the Springfield (Ohio) Globe:

The Bradford Family in Springfield, and Their Right to Share in an Enormous Fortune.

Readers of the Globe are probably familiar with the history of the celebrated Bradford fortune, amounting to $100,000,000, that now lies in the Bank of England, awaiting claimants this side of the ocean. The enormous wealth has been the subject of active litigation for a century. It represented the estate of Gov. Bradford, of Mayuflower fame. The story of this great fortune is rather a simple one. Gov. Bradford received his great fortune from his second wife, Alice Carpenter, who in turn received her great wealth from her first husband, an English nobleman. The story of the courtship in England, the separation of Gov. Bradford and Miss Carpenter, and their subsequent meeting andmarriate in America, when Gov. Bradford was a widower and his first live a widow, is familiar to every reader of history. This interesting revival of a well known story is a matter of more than usual interest. The wealth brought Gov. Bradford by his second wife was left by him at the time of his death unbequeathed. With that native honesty so characteristic of Englishmen, the property has been left untouched, and has increased to almost compound ratio, until it now almost equals the famous wealth of the Vanderbilts.

Of course there are numerous applicants to this mountain of gold. Five McIlrath brothers of Cleveland, closely related to Gov. Bradford, are aspirants to its possession. Mrs. Francis Hillar, of Lake county, is perhaps the nearest living blood heir to the great fortune. Numerous of her descendents will come in for a slice of the fortune. The Bradford family of this city are directly related to Gov. Bradford, and will make a strong fight for a share of the wealth. Mr. Almon Bradford, of South Charleston, has a bundle of parchment manucript that directly details their relationship, and contains a history of the Bradford family from the landing of the Mayflower to the present time, demonstrating the family connection. An interesting fight may be epected, as efforts of the Bradfords are likely to be commensurate with the value of the object--and $100,000,000 is lots of money.

Last edit 2 months ago by Doten Diaries
4-22-1883

4-22-1883

TERRITORIAL ENTERPRISE

Sunday..........April 22, 1883

FROM EASTERN NEVADA.

A Festive Wedding—Concealed Comstock Bonanzas—Smallpox—Sour Grapes—The Vineyard of the Lord—A Conscientious Propositiom.

[Corrrespondence of the Enterprise.]

AUSTIN, Nev., April 20, 1883.

One of the approaching weddings shadowed forth in my last week's letter took place evening before last, and was the most popular affair of the kind that ever transpired in Austin, although there was nothing ostentatious about it. It was the wedding of Alexander C. McCafferty and Miss Mary E. Barrett, both well known and popular residents of Austin. Alex. was elected County Assessor last Fall, and has more friends than anybody, and his bride is also very highly esteemed. Their wealth otherwise is not great, consequently they are all the happier. The wedding took place at a private residence, which, in Austin, does not mean an extensive house, but numerous friends managed to squeeze in and partake of the marriage feast and other hospitalities. The whole town considered itself present, anyhow, and everybody sympathized. The Lander brass band turned out in full force, and never did better. They played "Haste to the Wedding," "When Johnny Comes Marching Home," "Sweet By and By," and other significant pieces, and people all over town patted time to the music. Occasionally those on the back streets banged away with gun or pistol, and even the Chinese quarter testified its approbation with the explosion of a wheelbarrow load of fire-crackers and bombs. The Chinese band did not perform, but the drummer got out on the porch of their little red-faced Masonic temple and rattled away for over an hour, without pausing to grease his elbow. The happy pair received a most magnificent outfit in the way of bridal presents—a whole load of silver-ware, big pictures and a sack of flour. The "Tasty Club," an association of bachelors who have eaten together for several years past, and of which Alex.

Last edit 2 months ago by Doten Diaries
4-27-1883

4-27-1883

DAILY REVEILLE

AUSTIN, NEVADA.

FRIDAY..........APRIL 27, 1883

DEATH OF M. B. SCOTT.

Dr. M. B. Scott died last evening at his residence in this city. He was a native of Pennsylvania, and was aged about 41 years. He leaves a wife and daughter, who are now in Iowa, where they have been residing for about two years past.

Deceased came to Austin from Missouri in 1874 with his family, and for some time was Principal of the public school. After this he engaged in the practice of his profession. He was a physician of more than ordinary ability and would have had a lucrative practice has he resisted a weakness which seemed to be more than he was able to do, and he gradually became incapacitated for his profession. He lingered along for some time in this condition, until last evening the spirit of a naturally kind-hearted useful man took its flight to the unknown beyond. Whatever may have been his shortcomings in the past few years, let us, as friends and citizens, shed sorrowful tears over the grave of one that we knew to be of noble instincts, and in our hearts deeply regret the sad affair.

The funeral of the deceased took place at 2 o'clock this afternoon, from his late residence on Union street. The remains were accompanied to the cemetery by the Masonic Order. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. F. M. Warrington, pastor of the Methodist Church.

Last edit 2 months ago by Doten Diaries
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