James Adam diary: 1857-1863 (Ms. Codex 1948)

ReadAboutContentsHelp
Diary comprising two volumes spanning the years from 1857 to 1863 written by James Adam. Volume 1 contains Adam's descriptions his journey from Scotland to India as a medical officer. On August 15, 1857 Adam departed from London on a steamer ship the Candia. He wrote of his sea voyage including officers he traveled with, the weather, landscapes, missing his family, sea sickness, and miles traveled. He arrived at Kalkota on November 5, 1857. Adam worked at a hospital and witnessed a portion of the Indian Rebellion of 1857. In February 1858 Adam was deployed to the ship Belgravia to take charge of the wounded and sick at the South African Cape. He traveled with his servant Harold. Once anchored at Table Bay Adam described the native people, seeing Dr. Livingstone. Adam noted he had a muster of forty natives whom he reluctantly treated for skin diseases. There is a copy of a letter to his parents and pencil drawings of the Cape of Good Hope. On the journey back to Calcutta there was an incident with the captain regarding ailing horses. In June 1858 Adam mentioned seeing cholera cases, reading Waston and works on homeopathy. Adam also worked off of the H.M.S. Proserpine. In March 1859 Adam began his voyage back to England on the Ivanhoe he mentioned playing chess and catching fish. Reading volume 1 from back to front are poems and songs. One of the poems was "written on board the Candia". Tables of daily latitude and longitude for the voyages to India and England are in the volume. Some accounting of receipts and expenditures is in the volume. Adam arrived back in Edinburgh on August 5, 1859. Volume 2 commences in 1861. In sporadic entries Adam described his arrival and work at Bethnal House Asylum with Dr. Ritchie. and Dr. Miller. In August 1863 Adam wrote of his trip to Scotland and attending a wedding in Portobello. He mentioned seeing family members in Edinburgh. Reading volume 2 from back to front is a clipping of an epitaph for Lord Clyde pasted over writing in pencil. Adam wrote an autopsy of a young woman named Ann Jones aged 23. A majority of volume 2 is blank. Inscribed on the first leaf of volume 1: J. F. Adam journal, commenced August 13, 1857 on leaving home for the first time to sail for India. Inscribed on the last leaf of volume 1: James F. Adam, Surgeon, H.M.S. Proserpine. Volume 2 is inscribed: Private, Jame Adam M.D., January 20, 1861. https://franklin.library.upenn.edu/catalog/FRANKLIN_9977359130603681

Pages That Need Transcription

p. 31
Indexed

p. 31

with Gibraltar this afternoon but of course were so far out to sea to see it. Today we are in Latitude 39.33 N. Long 12.21 W. We have run 235 miles since yesterday at 12 oclock there being 60 miles in a degree sailing at this rate we should reach Calcutta in 45 days but we cannot get on so favourably generally. The breeze was strong last night & in our favour we are now 460 miles distant from Madeira which we will likely pass in 2 days. Thursday Augt. 29th 1857 Last night met the Cheif Engineer of the ship who is a Scotsman from Queensferry (we have not many Scotsmen on board.) he occupies a station in the ship equal to the Cheif Officer he has a very nice Cabin very well fitted up. we sat chatting till pretty late it is strange how some Scotsmen get friends here To night it is stormy the clouds are gathering the wind high & the sea also running high so we may look out for a stiff night of it Lat. 36 37 North Long: 13.44 230 miles

Last edit 5 months ago by Dendendaloom
p. 32
Indexed

p. 32

Friday Augt 21st 1857 We have an awning put up over the quarter deck every day now to sheild us from the heat of the sun which is becoming pretty strong One can easily see that the sun is more vertical here than in England everyone is looking out for a sight of Madeira today we are steaming between it & the mainland we were doomed to be disappointed however we are passed its lat. + long. : without seeing it. we shipped a sea this morning which made the ladies run into their cabins in hot haste. A great many sea fowl are flying about which shows that we cannot be at a great distance from land. today our lat is 32°. 40. north Long. 15. 52 west. Distance run 230 miles

=Saturday August 22nd 1854

I got up early this morning & had a salt water bath, it is very pleasant & refreshing Now that we are getting into a warmer climate We have got the most novel shower baths on deck I ever saw they pump up salt water from the sea through a pipe such

Last edit 5 months ago by Dendendaloom
p. 33
Indexed

p. 33

As they use with the fire engines in Edinr roses like those in a watering pan are attached to it A sailor gets in the top of a hatchway with this in his hand. While a dozen natives work at the pump. You get under the roses & have a first rate ducking Your shower baths in Edinr are mere childs play compared to this At 8 o'clock Am. we saw a ship ahead. We soon gained upon her. We hoisted our colours they returned the tricolor so that she was French. We were not near enough to interchange any more signals. We soon lost sight of her far behind At 3 o'clock this afternoon we sighted one of the Canary islands Palma for my part I could not think it any thing else than a cloud the Sailors however said it Was land & that it was the island Palma. We also saw dimly the Peak of Teneriffe which was very high out from the sea 12300 feet we guess more than 100 miles distant from Teneriffe & about 18 from Palma. On the latter we could see some houses apparently built among the rocks. I did not see that

Last edit 5 months ago by Dendendaloom
p. 34
Indexed

p. 34

A ship could land at it. As there was nothing to be seen round & round it but high rocks & the sea beating against them. Further on in the eveing we saw. Santa Cruz another of the group of Canary's - The sailors & officers servants meet every night on the forecastle after their work is done. & amuse themselves with singing, there are some good singers among them & they sing some good songs Lat: 29.45. N Long: 17.49. W. Distance run 218m

Sunday Augt: 23rd 1857

This morning is very close & hot. We are beginning to feel the heat a good deal now. We have made little progress the last 24 hours the breeze being right ahead. We are only going half steam power. I can scarcely beleve it is Sabbath mg. [morning] here. You hear the sailors shouting as usual the passengers sitting & laying about as usual the only difference being that the sailors have trea -ted themselves to clean shirts & clean white trousers. We had service on board this mg. [morning] at 10.30 conducted in the Church of England

Last edit 5 months ago by Dendendaloom
p. 35
Complete

p. 35

form. The officers of the ship sailors & natives were all drawn upon the quarter deck in full dress. The officers with cap & gold band blue cloth dress & brass buttons. The sailors with blue jackets white trousers & straw hats all smart & clean. Some of the natives were dressed in the same way, but a good many had on the eastern costume & richly variegated silk dresses the roll being called they were all sent off and the order given to ring the bell for church. The cheif officer & purser then read over the Church of England service having the Union Jack. spread over the capstan for a pulpit. We had books provided by the ship Has little of real religion there is in the Church of England service compared with our own good old Scotch system. Here there is merely repetition of words it comes to be a mere matter of form while in our system we have a thorough heartstirring discourse delivered by a man who has religion really at heart. This in effect was

Last edit 5 months ago by Dendendaloom
Displaying pages 31 - 35 of 642 in total