Mary Emma Jocelyn diary, 1851-1852.

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  • UPenn Ms. Codex 1770
  • Born in New Haven, Connecticut to antebellum abolistionist, clergyman, and engraver Simeon Smith Jocelyn (1799-1879) and Harriet Starr (d. 1877). The Jocelyn family moved to Williamsburg, Brooklyn in 1844 where Simeon Smith Jocelyn was installed as the pastor of the First Congregational Church. Mary Emma was the fifth of eight children born to the Jocelyns. Her siblings are Harriette Luceannah (1823-), Simeon Starr (1825-), Albert Higley (1827-), Caroline Eliza (1830-1868), Nathaniel (1835-1852), Cornelius Buell (1838-1864), and Frederick Henry (1841-).
  • This volume contains the diary of Mary Emma Jocelyn spanning ten months from November 1851 to September 1852. The first entry in the diary was recorded on Thanksgiving Day, November 27, 1851. At the top of the page is written "Journal continued." Jocelyn made daily entries in her diary and recorded her life with her family and friends while living in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, New York. A brief note on the weather begins each entry. Jocelyn described her daily activities including sewing, reading, seeing family and friends, and distributing tracts. She attended church on Sundays chiefly at her father's church, the First Congregational Church, and singing class with her sisters Carrie (Caroline) and Harriet. She was often visiting or receiving friends including Mary Reeve and Hannah Hudson among others. Jocelyn attended lectures and events at the Lyceum in Brooklyn. She also visited her sister in Brooklyn and mentions ferrying over. The Jocelyn family and the Hudson family appeared to be close friends and the Jocelyn siblings spent much time with brothers George and Henry and their sister Hannah. Jocelyn wrote often of Henry Hudson and worried about his crisis of faith. Major events in the family are described throughout the ten-month period, including the joyous wedding of her sister Harriet to Douglas Murphy on June 30, 1852 and the death of her brother Nathaniel (Natty) in August 1852. Thirty pages in the diary were dedicated to Natty's illness and death. This lengthy entry is dated September 27, 1852 and describes the family's anguish and grief over Natty's passing. Other notable entries include her father Simeon's travels, her lengthy description of a dream, helping a young Irish immigrant, her interest in an essay by Edgar Allen Poe, and the celebration of the founding of Williamsburg in January 1852. The diary is in chronological order from November 27, 1851 through April 1, 1852. After April 1 the diary is arranged as follows: July 8 to August 8, 1852; 23 pages dated September 27, 1852; April 29 to June 8, 1852; April 3 to April 28, 1852; June 9 to July 5, 1852. Bound in at the end are seven pages continuing the September 27th entry. Laid in the volume is a printed flier for an exhibition and sale at Montague Hall, Brooklyn for "articles offered for sale at the Anti Slavery Fair" November 30, 1851 with notes on the verso by Mary Emma Jocelyn.

    Pages

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    utterly unable to realize my loss. Anne and Mary Emma came with Albert about ten o'clock, and just about that time Stan reached Brooklyn whither he had gone to bear the sad news to Harriet __ We retired late __ I slept from very weariness, and as if in mockery my dreams were what they seldom are at any other time -- of gayety and mirth and I would start from my slumber horrified at the thought: __ in every one Natty appeared as he was wont to do in his days of health and gladness, with the sparkle of joy in his eyes, and the flash of wit, and the kiss of affection on his dewy lips. How dreadful it was to awake, and feel how different was the reality. With the dawn the sobs that I could not restrain awoke Carrie and Annie who slept with me and we all wept together -- it seemed more than I could bear, and restless with pain I arose and paced the room and hall long before I could think of dressing. How clearly the morning rays brought back the recollection of him -- his was the first voice I used to hear at that hour and it was was his own sweet tones that called me to greet returning day. That voice, that step, it seemed as though I could hear them still, but I knew they would come no more. When at last I dressed I went first to Mother's room, she had not yet arisen but lay with her face buried in the pillow; __ when I spok to her how mournfully patient was the sad face that was turned toward me with sorrow written in every lineament. Father was up and appeared perfectly calm He in whom he had trusted had not forsaken him in the hour of trial. __ 'Twas a stricken family that bowed together that morning at the altar of prayer and every heart was heavy and every eye was dimmed __ our grief was quiet and subdued, but deep and bitter -- it was only

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    when alone that I ventured to give full vent to the uncontrollable anguish that seemed crushing me. Directly after prayers I stole away to Mother's room where near the windows they had laid out the dear remains.

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