Jane Rooker Breeden correspondence, 1909

ReadAboutContentsHelp

Pages

RD06517
Complete

RD06517

Telephone 1791 Haymarket

Office of The Woman's Journal No. 6 Beacon St., Room 1018.

Boston, Mass., Jan 19 1909

Dear Mrs Breeden

Your letter with list of names is just recd. I will today mail the Presidential Suffrage circular & U S Supreme Court wereupon to each of the gentlemen,.whose names you so kindly sind. My idea is to petition for the Presidential Suffrage not as a substitute for a petition for State Suffrage by change of Constitution, but in addition to it.

The action of the W.C.T.U women in asking for property qualification W.S. is, I think, injudicious, & less likely to be successful than full suffrage. But, if pray advice to the So Dak. W.S.A. is worth anything, it is not to antagonize them. Instead, go on with your petition for full suffrage on the same terms and qualifications as are prescribed for male citizens; also as a part of the same petition, ask for also the passing of your resolution if the two houses enabling female citizens to register and vote in the appointment of Presidential elections. Be surenot to have that any

Last edit 3 months ago by University of South Dakota, University Libraries
RD06518
Complete

RD06518

part of your proposed constitutional amendment, but a separate measure to be granted outright by a simple majority vote of both houses, just like the choice of a U.S. Senator. It will not meet the signature of the Governor.

Try to get one or more eminent lawyers, to come to the Hearing to affirm the constitutionality of such action by the Legislature, under Article 2 Seal Par 2 of the U.S Constitution, as interpreted and explained by the Supreme Court of the US. in the Michigan case, which I enclose.

I hope your State Society, while not opposing or antagonizing the bill introduced by the W.C.I.U., will make its own separate petition for full State & National Suffrage, & ask for a separate hearing.

I should be sorry to have the two Societies confounded. Equally sorry to cause them come into conflict. "It takes two to make a fight". The W.C.I.U, have a right to ask for property suffrage if they see fit., the Suffrage Society has an equal right to ask for equal suffrage. National suffrage, be it remembered, is full & complete suffrage in that particular field, for all to own on same terms as men.

Yours Truly, Henry B Blackwell

Last edit 3 months ago by University of South Dakota, University Libraries
RD06519
Complete

RD06519

Telephone 1791 Haymarket

Office of The Woman's Journal No., 6 Beacon St. Room 1018.

Boston, Mass., Jan. 19 1909

Dear Mrs.Breeden:

I am sorry the W.C.T.U have made this move, but it cannot now be helped.

My advice to the suffragists would be to go ahead and push their request for an amendment granting full suffrage. If the Legislature submits it, well and good. If

Last edit 2 months ago by University of South Dakota, University Libraries
RD06520
Complete

RD06520

they refuse, they may possibly grant tax payers' suffrage as a 'sop', as they did in Michigan last year. You remember the Michigan suffragists made a strong effort for full suffrage. They did not get it, but the Constitutional Convention gave them the half loaf, which was better than nothing.

Yours cordially, Alice Stone Blackwell.

Last edit 2 months ago by University of South Dakota, University Libraries
RD06521
Complete

RD06521

Moylan, Pa., March 2, 1909.

My dear State Officers:-

First let me say there seems to be some trouble with the telegraph office that they do not forward telegrams. They should know that our telegraph station is Moylan via Media, so if you need to send me any telegrams, send in that way.

I am sending this letter of congratulations to several of the officers, for I want you to get it at once.

I think women everywhere owe a debt of gratitude to your Governor for the splend service he has rendered the cause of justice in your State, and I hope everyone will send him a letter of thanks and appreciation. I do so hope and pray that we may be victorious, and that he may have the honor, as long as the history of the State lasts, of having signed the Bill granting woman's political freedom.

I have sent a letter to the National Official Board asking in regard to the extent of co-operation which the National can guarantee your State Association, and as soon as I learn I will let you know. Everything will depend upon your desire for co-operation.

In the mean time, I think you should settle upon a plan of campaign, and decide where you would better open your headquarters, etc. While the National Association desire to assist you in every way, it is advisable that a State woman should be placed in charge of State Headquarters, co-operating with a representative from the National Association who has had experience and who will advise and aid you in every possible manner. We would want our representative to be one with when you are all in perfect harmony, and in whose judgement and ability you have perfect confidence, and I suggest Mrs. Rachel Foster Avery, National Vice-

Last edit 3 months ago by University of South Dakota, University Libraries
Displaying pages 1 - 5 of 69 in total