Butler Diary: Northern and Central Syria II, 1899

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19 W. Church The smaller of the two churches is situated in the most western section of the town. This is a comparatively late structure, its East end is square (plan no. 3) the nave was divided by ? of three columns each. These supported plain arches and the apse was arched as usual. The capitals were of the simplest sub-corinthian partaking largely of easly christian Roman character. The external? extensive? ornaments of the simplest find only the northern portal having any claim to richness. This is provided with a deep set of mouldings, in the middle of the lintel is a large symbolic disk around which the mouldings are carried. Upon this portal is an inscription which follows the moulding on its curve over the disk and is carried for a little distance down the jambs. The inscription gives the patron saint as Sergius and the date 609 A.D. (W.K.P. insc 29) Of this church only the West wall and portions of the eastern ? walls are standing.

Last edit 4 months ago by Visual Resources, Department of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University
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20 E. Church The larger church is just east of the centre of the town. It stands a complete ruin in a group of ruined ecclesiastical buildings, forming the northern side of a quadrangle which is entered from the west through an arched gateway. ? this gateway is a large rectangular portal which seems to have been removed from the West of the church in Saracenic times and built against the arched gateway to strengthen it. a part of the lintel and its inscription are hidden by the curve of the arch (W.K.P. insc.24, date 480). The church itself presents a rather unusual plan (no. 7) at the east end where the semicircular apse projects slightly beyond the eastern wall with which it is structurally connected. Only the very plain west wall and a portion of the apse and east wall are standing but the ruins show that the church was one of considerable richness. A fallen lintel lying

Last edit 4 months ago by Visual Resources, Department of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University
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20 E. Church The larger church is just east of the cente of the town. It stands a complete ruin in a group of ruined ecclesiastical buildings, forming the northern side of a quadrangle which is entered from the west throuhg an arched gateway. ? this gateway is a large rectangular portal which seems to have been removed from the West of the church in Saracenic times and built against the arched doorway to strengthen it. a part of the lintel and its inscription are hidden by the curve of the arch (.W.K. P. Insc 24, date 480). The church itsled presents a rather unudual plan (No 7) at the East end. When the semicircular? apse projects slightly beyond the eastern wall with which it is structurally connected. Only the very plain West wall and a portion of the apse and east wall are standing but the ? show that the church was ? of considerable richness. A fallen lintel lying

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21 face down is among the finest specimens of its kind that we have seen. it bears an insc. in Greek (W.K.P. 25) dating to 401 AD. The nave was divided by 2 rows of massive columns and arches. The capitals are of a peculiar pattern which is in no sense a modification of one of the Greek orders They have a square plinth and a deep ? ornamented with perpendicular flutings. at the neck is a simpler bead moulding. South of the church, on the east side of the quadrangle was a finely constructed rectangular building, completely destroyed for building purposes, with only its western portal standing and portions of a smaller doorway to the south. This western portal is by all accounts the most beautiful we have found in this region. The decoration which extends across the lintel and down the jambs consists of a variety of mouldings interspersed with ? of foliate

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