Wisconsin Women's History

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Mathilde Franziska Anneke - Women's Suffrage Correspondence, 1866-1884 (Box 5, Folder 6)

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1880, June 5 The Woman's Suffrage Association State of Wisconsin (writing on right side says "Conn. 1880 June 5th (?)" Laura R. Wolcott, M.D., President (right) P.S. Anneke, Recording Secretary (left) Mathilde Franziska Anneke, Vice Pres't (right) Kate Kane, Corresponing Secretary (l) Milwaukee,-------------188 (left)

To all of you our welcome and hearty greeting that you come to join us, to help prepare for a grand work. The way was long, which had led us to the point at which the vicory is appearing after a hard struggle. To you, who have in good earnest appeared here with us a hearty welcome! and again welcome! And t those, who on account of illness or old age earnest appear, but who are united with us in spirit, who have borne the beacon of knowledge and perseverance, be our silent thanks.

And sacred be the memory of those who are no more among us, the combatants from grand cause who are ever us immortal.

the men of Wisconsin, citizens of this state have at the last legislature informed us with the right, the duty and responsibility to share with them as we have truly desired it the care of ruling the sate businesses, the care for the welfare of the whole country together with its inhabitants, which has so long rested on their shame alone

Last edit over 1 year ago by Ckthayer
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The Woman's Suffrage Association State of Wisconsin (writing on right side says "Conn. 1880 June 5th (?)" Laura R. Wolcott, M.D., President (right) P.S. Anneke, Recording Secretary (left) Mathilde Franziska Anneke, Vice Pres't (right) Kate Kane, Corresponing Secretary (l) Milwaukee,-------------188 (left)

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They have proved on the morning of a new epoch, that the right and scientific cognition is missing in them, and that they will break the way for a men era, which is looming for mankind when with the political equalization of women.

We have not approached [crossed out and replaced with attacked} them with our demands, but have clearly & scientifically proven for years that woman is justified to counsel and judge on the most superior questions relating to the welfare of mankind.

For many years, wise women and unprejudiced men have appealed to the discernment of legislatures in ths country but the honor is due to the legislature of our young and expired developing state, [illegible crossed out words] to home

Last edit over 1 year ago by Ckthayer

Mathilde Franziska Anneke - Women's Suffrage Correspondence, Miscellaneous Undated (Box 5, Folder 5)

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ANNIVERSARY of the American Equal Rights Association. The American Equal Rights Association will hold its Anniversary in New York, Steinway Hall, Wednesday and Thursday, May 12th and 13th, and in Brooklyn, Academy of Music, on Friday, the 14th. After a century of discussion on the rights of citizens in a republic, and the gradual extension of Suffrage, without property or educational qualifications, to all white men, the thought of the nation has turned for the last thirty years to negroes and women. And in the enfranchisement of black men by the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments to the Federal constitution, the Congress of the United States has now virtually established an aristocracy of sex, an aristocracy hitherto unknown in the history of nations. With every type and shade of manhood thus exalted above their heads, there never was a time when all women, rich and poor, white and black, native and foreign, should be so wide awake to the degradation of their position, and so president in their demands to be recognized in the government. Woman's enfranchisement is now a practical question in England and the United States. With bills before Paliament, Congress and all our State legislatures-with such able champions as John Stuart Mill and George William Curtis, women need but speak the word to secure her political freedom to-day. We sicereley hope that in the coming National Anniversary every State and Territory, east and west, north, and south, will be represented. We invite delegates, too, from all those countries in the Old World where women are demnding their political rights. Let there be a grand gathering in the metropolis of the nation, that Republicans and Democrats may alike understand, that with the women of this country lies a polical power in the future, that both parties would do well to respect. The following speakers from the several state are already pledged: Anna E. Dickinson, Frederick Douglass, Mary A. Livermore, Madam Anneke, Lilie Peckham, Phebe Couzens, Mrs. M. H. Brinkerhoff. Lucretia Mott, President. Vice- Presidents. Elizabeth Cady Stanton, New York, Frederick Douglass, " Henry Ward Beecher, " Martha C. Wright, " Frances, D. Gage, " Olympia Brown, Massachusetts, Elizabeth B. Chase, Rhode Island, Charles Prince, Connecticut, Robert Purvis, Pennsylvania, Antoinette B. Blackwell, Nwe Jersey, Josephine S. Griffing, Washington, D.C., Thomas Garrett, Delawere, Stephen H. Camp, Ohio, Euohemia Cochrane, Michigan, Mary A. Livermore, Illinois, Mrs. I. H. Stuegeon, Missouri, Amelia Bloomer, Iowa, Mary A. Starret, Kansas, Virginia Penny, Kentucky. Corresponding Secretary. Recording Secretaries. Henry B. Blackwell, Harriet Purvis. Treasurer. John J. Merritt. Executive Committee. Lucy Stone, Edward S. Bunker, Elizabeth R. Tilton, Ernestine L. Rose, Robert J. Johnston, Edwin A. Studwell, Anna Cromwell Field, Susan B. Anthony, Theodore Tilton, Margaret E. Winchester, Abby Hutchinson Patton, Oliver Johnson, Mrs. Horage Greeley, Abby Hopper Gibbons, Elizabeth Smith Miller. Communications and Contributions may be addressed to John J. Merritt, 131 William street, New York. Newspapers friendly, please publish this call.

Last edit 9 months ago by kjshill
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SBa Undated probably 1869

Dear Madam Anneke I am delighted with assurances from your letter to Mrs. E. S. Miller and Mrs. Livermore that you are to be in New York at the [underlined - Anniversary ] - I have sent you rolls of the Call several times & hope you have received them, and are getting some letters from good German men & women for the meetings - I want to say to you if you have not friends with

Last edit 8 months ago by shashathree
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Dear Madam - This was written a month ago - I have just got Mrs Ross letter - & have told her you must come - we must pay part if not all your expenses - come over Erie Rail Road

whom you are to stop - we hope to be able to shelter you, at moderate cost, at the New [underlined - Woman's Bureau] - to be opened by that time. The same invitation is to go to Dr. Ross Lilie Peckham & Miss Chapin, if they come down as I hope they will - We hope to find quarters for all the delegates on as easy terms as possible - Mrs. Mendt hopes to get out her first paper soon - Mrs. Livermore is making her[underlined - Agitator] excellent - Cordially yours - Susan B. Anthony

Last edit 8 months ago by shashathree

Carrie Chapman Catt - Diaries, Europe, South Africa, August 2 - November 15, 1911 (Box 1, Folder 1)

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41 [scratched out?]

the path led through a palm grove bordered by palms on both sides whose branches touched overhead. At one point a splendid view of the Devils cataract was seen. I got back around 12:30 hot and tired as usual. The Dr. came in about the same time, very tired. In the afternoon we all went to the Rivers bank about a mile away and were canoed over to Cataract Island. One end of this Island forms part of the ledge over which the Fall tumbles and when water is high a good part of it is covered and the Island cannot be reached. Here we had splendid views. The Island projects beyond the line of the Fall, so that a person standing on the point x gets a fine view of the Devils [pen sketch Devils Cataract Main Fall] Cataract which is the first Fall, and the Main Fall. In high water another Fall is created over the spot x. We considered this experience the most delightful of our stay. On our return I talked with two young men from whom I learned that I had not gone far enough to see the Big Tree. With them as guides Miss Cameron and I walked to it. It is said to be 87 ft

Last edit 4 months ago by shashathree
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We remained until about noon at the kraal. After the beer drinking and the Chief taking a second and liberal portion, his tongue was limbered as is the habit with beer of all lands and he confided in the interpreter that he was about to be married. It would be the fifth time but alas one had died so he would have only four! He hoped to take anoth er next year. A new hut was being constructed and it was for the new wife. we bought some necklaces from women in the Kraal who took them off their necks. We then distributed sixpences and tikkies (as the three cent piece is called) to the children who suddenly increased in numbers at an astonishing rate and left us quite bankrupt. We retraced our journey over the hot hills and at the station turned off into a beautiful garden filled with a wonderful variety of strange trees,and plants. It was a mass of rich color for most of them were in the spring blossoming. Acacias of endless variety were in blossom azalias in great trees were as thickly covered with blossoms as the little ones forced in the hot houses which we get at Christmas time. Here was located a Girs High School and the principal Mrs Colepepper had invited us to lunch. It was a private and successful school. In the garden we saw our first pawpaw tree. Later I became most enthusiastec [enthusiastic] over this fruit - a sort of old fashioned muskmelon which grows on a tree. It is too perishable to export. It is eaten with lemon juice and sugar and has a delicate flavor all its own. I should add that its particular home is Durban where the hotel treats us to them three times a day. We arrived home late in the afternoon desperately tired and rested as best we could before dressing in our best for the reception that evening. Here I made a speech and was bored as I always am at such affrirs [affairs]. In this case I had the opportunity of boring others. On Thursday morning we sallied forth at an early hour after photographs and I bought two dozen. We then went to Lady Mackenzies for morning tea. We found her with her hat on, as that fool notion has reached S.A. Later we visited the Museum. Miss Cameron lunched with Lady Steel who has married and come to S.A. but I dared not do so much, and rested at the hotel. At four there was a tea out of town about a mile. The lady, Mrs. Davis, the wife of a publisher, sent her carriage for me and sent me home. She had a beautiful big home and the drawing room was of elegant size with a platform at one end. I never saw a room anywhere which I envied more. In the evening we had our public meeting. We left Maritsburg early the next morning arriving in Durbanabout one o'clock. The usual committee met us. Never did they fail to do this and to see us off. We went at once to our hotel where for 15 shillings inclusive we had most delightful rooms facing the sea. This was Friday Oct. 13th. After lunch and a little cleaning up we went to a meeting of the Club (suffrage) When that was over the president Mrs. Ayers took me to a shop where she reccommended a dressmaker. She was willong [willing] to do the work but the material must be purchased in the shop, so I arranged to have two simple frocks of muslin made. I had to do some skirmishing about to collect all my baggage. I had forwarded all of my trunks except the wardrobe from Cape Town and our chairs came on too. I has sent a case of books by the boat I came on and another case of books from Pt. Elizabeth. A hat box came on from Pretoria. My thinnest summer things were in these trunks. The evening was spent in unpacking such as I had received. On Saturday I went to see another dressmaker in order to get the material made which I had bought in Johannesburg. I succeeded and left the muslin for two more dresses. We met the ladies of the suffrage club for morning tea at a restaurantand it was a curious sight to see crowds of men and women gathered at this hour for their precious cup. Then we went shopping, getting back to the hotel at I [1?] for lunch. I unpacked further in the afternoon and Mrs. Ayers and Mrs Behr took tea with me at four and I was occupied withh callers until dinner. It was good to get to bed early. On Sunday I worked more with my things and went with Miss Cameron to Mrs Kerr Cross for tea at four. She received us out of doors. We found Dr. Jacobs, Mrs. Boessma and some delegates had arrived at the hotel. Again I went to bed early, but first I trimmed a new hat I had bought. On Monday the convention began and I was present every minute to advise when necessary. We met from eleven to one and from 2.30 to 5. In the evening was the

Last edit 4 months ago by shashathree
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reception where I spoke and again got even with those who bored me.

On Tuesday we met in the morning and in the afternoon we went out in to naphtha launches to Salisbury Island where among the trees amd mosquitoes we had tea with which was served some delicious home made cake. It was a pleasant afternoon.

That evening there was a public meeting in a small hall where the delegates were to speak. Some had been tired out and had headaches as the result of the heavy work so I had to make a speech to help out.

The next day we met in the morning as usual and in the afternoon there was a trolly ride and a tea at a fine home.

I excused myself from that and went to bed. The public meeting came that evening.

Durban had a town hall which covers a block and it contains a beautiful big hall with most disconcerting acoustic properties. For the first time I could not wear my velvet. The sweat poured off in buckets as it was.

Thursday morning there was another meeting and calls from delegates all the afternoon. I was glad to get to bed early again.

On Friday the Mayoress gave us a lunch includoing [including] the Executive of the Suffrage Club. This was given at the Hotel Royal.

In the morning Miss Cameron and I went to the dock to see our ship but by the time we arrived the rain was falling in torrents and we did not get out of the tram. We went back to the starting point and took a ricksha to the hotel.

The rain ceased about noon and when the Mayoress invited us for a drive I requested a trip to the dock. Dr. Jacobs went with me and we went over the ship. We were quite disgusted and indignant as it was far from our ideas of being a first class ship. I returned to my dressmakers and got home for dinner.

Those four dresses all came home Saturday night and during the week had demanded several calls and fittings which had made the week much harder, but the comfort of being provided with thin things for these tropical climates simply repaid the trouble. It is worth mentioning that for each of the five dresses, I gave a definite order as to style and none was made after it.

On Sunday the Heavens opened and the rain descended in torrents, being interspersed with thunder storms. No one interrupted, the delegates had gone, and the day was devoted to packing.

I went over my papers, wrote seven letters to S.A. packed three trunks one case of books, and ten small packages. We were all worn to a frazzle by bed time.

It rained all night and all the next day. We were to leave the Hotel with our baggage at ten o'clock. A man in Cape Town owed me on an overcharge on my roll which had got sent to Johannesburg instead of my Hotel in Cape Town when I arrived.

I received a telegram that he had telegraphed money, but where? The hotel manager said it would be at the post office, so early I took the ricksha and went there, got my money and returned in another all the time in pouring rain.

That morning I had to unpack three packages to get as many articles required because of the storm conditions At last we reached our steamer and on a muddy deck in the rain received the large delegation who had come to see us off.

The Norwegian Consul, Mr. Egeland brought the Dr and I each a bouquet of carnations. The Club brought me a book of views of of S.A. Mrs. Ayres, president, Mrs. Jessie Forbes Secretary, Mrs. Behr treasurer, Mrs Ankotill and many others were among the group.

We pulled out about one and the rain had about ceased but the sea was rocky as a result of the three days rain. Mrs. Boersma gave up, frankly delivered up her meals and stayed in bed until we reached the first stop. The Doctor took her meals on deck and Miss Cameron had a struggle, but I was right side up. I found my bed the worst possible, the table indifferent, the drawing room so small that four people around a table for cards and that table filled the room, and our cabin provided with no place to sit.

These things we had discovered when we visited the ship and later had called on the Manager in Durban and gave him such a lecture on the way we were being treated that I am sure he said afterwards that that was one of those soured suffragettes.

But after putting things away and filling the uper berth I could make my room fairly comfortable. We got used to the table altho the bed was always bad I yielded to the inevitable.

We sailed October 23 at 1 o'clock, Monday. We arrived at Lorenco Marques the next day in the early afternoon. There was a dock and we went off at once taking a walk about the town getting back for dinner.

The next morning we went off again, took a tram ride about the City, visited the really remarkable botanical garden, had coffee at a public tea house and got back to lunch

Last edit 4 months ago by shashathree
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10 and with a very dense foliage, and dotted here and there with the fruit. I bought a dozen in the market to try. We had heard how delicious they were but they were not yet ripe in S. A. They have a decided flavor of turpentine and it would take time to acquire the taste for these.

Our object in going into the country was to visit Abubu, the clove plantation. All these islands possess qualities which are especially adapted to the clove and 90% of the cloves of the world are grown here. It has been a great Arab monopoly. The clove grows on a large and graceful tree. These are planted about 24ft apart and their branches touch when grown. Alarge [A large] bright red bud appears inbunches [in bunches]. From the end a flowerinsignificant [flower insignificant] in appearance and of bright yellow in color blossoms. The seed pods which follow are in shape like the clove with only one on a stem. These stems are in bunches. They are red and green in patches. When ripe an outer peel comes off. These will not be ripe before spring. The leaf and the blossom and the seed pods all taste of the spice.

I was fortunately able to get good photos of many interesting things in Zanzibar. At 2.30 I was driven to the American Consulate, where Mr. A. W. Weddell has invited several Americans. We had a nice talk and then went to the English Club for lunch. Mrs. Edward Clark, wife of the British Commissioner, was present and after lunch I went with her in her ricksha to the Residency which is a big fine building. She showed me over it and it was beautifully adapted to tropical life with its big verandahs and Indian fans which are hung over tables and chairs and worked by a string pulled by a black boy. The object of the visit was to see some little animals-the smallest antelope in Afraca [Africa], the Paa. There were six and no larger that [than] a cat but decked forth with little horns. They are native in Zanzibar. Mrs. Clark sent me with her ricksha to the beach where I got a boat gor [for] the ship. The others had preceded me. The ship inself [itself] offered good entertainment. It was surrounded by all sorts of curious craft filled with men and boys, in all conceivable dress and undress and with all kinds of head dress. Samll [Small] boats in which two half grown boys could comfortable [comfortably] sit were numerous and were propelled by their hands.. They requested tikkies and when one was thrown out they would jump and catch them under the water. On board several Indian traders had spread their wares and were doing a lively business, the passengers usually getting what they wanted for about half the price asked. Miss Cameron got a beautiful carved ivory box for 2lbs; the Doctor got a well made embroidered blouse for 6shillings (silk) and an embroidered pongee dress pattern for a pound. Mrs. Boesma had the temerity to buy a pearl and diamond ring for a hundred dollars and all the ladies bought drawn work table spreads and similar things for small figures. I bought nothing. Meanwhile the steamer was loading with interesting things. The chief thing is Copra. It is rotted cocoanuts [coconuts] which are taken to Marseilles and there the juice is expressed and made into soap. The smell is strong but not offensive. Much ivory tusks of elephants, comes through this port. Formerly practially [practically] all from central africa [Africa] came here. Then after getting the tusks whch [which] are very heavy and worth from $200 to $500 per pair, the buyers bought or stole or captured slaves to carry them to Zanzibar. Here slaves were bought and sold until 20 and some say 12 years ago. We took on a good many boxes of cloves also. (A tree must be ten years old before it is in full bearing.) The British Government forbid slavery here i n [in] 1890 but the law was violated for some time after. The guide told us that now when people had slaves they had to pay them.

We were sorry to leave when our time arrived, for it certainly seemed as if we had come into a dream land where its strange people, strange flowers and fruits and buildings and boats might well have been the creation of the imagination. A guide book saidof [said of] ZanzibarN [Zanzibar]: "set in a sea of perfect sapphire blue, withits [with its] graceful contours outlined in tenderest green and rounded hills crowned with dainty palmswhich [palms which] lazily nod their feathery crowns in the balmy air, etc." The cocoanut [coconut] is certainly the most picturesque thing I know as it grows very tall and its tuft of graceful leaves and fruits are always outlines against the sky. My photos must tell the rest of the tale of out [our] delightful visit to Zanzibar.

Last edit 4 months ago by shashathree
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