Great Britain Indian Department Collection, 1753-1795

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[William Johnson] Draft AL to Captain [William] Murray, May 25, 1765; Johnson Hall, [New York]

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May 25.th 1765 - To Capt Wm Murray Comd at Fort Pitt

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Tobias Shadick [Tobias Shattock] ALS to William Johnson, October 14, 1765; Charlestown, [Rhode Island]

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May it pleas your Honour, with the deepest Sense of Gratitude and thanks, we Approach you acknowledging your pious design and charitable Donation in assisting us in our Difficulty. and now we Humbly pray your Honour to Inform us By a Letter to Mr. Robinson whether you Have Recev'd them orders from Home or not. moreover we would Inform your Honour that we Have us'd ye utmost of our Skill, to Enlighten those of our Tribe that acted against us and have Been Sucsesfull in a Good degree: for they have mainly Seen their Error, and are Hartily united with us. we are all Harty and well, and Our Tribe in one Sense Increases very fast. and in another Decreas' for our Land is Sold So that many of our young men are obliged to go to Sea and So are Lost So that our most promising young men are often Laid in a watery Tomb to our Lamentation- may it pleas your Honour we Esteem you as our Best friend and do allways pray that you may Be assisted By our Dear Savour in all your proseeding and finally Receive a crown of Glory that Shall Never fade----- we are Ever Bound to acknowledge our Selves your most obedient and very Humble Servants untill Death

Sign'd in Behalf of the Tribe pr. Tobias X Shadick

Charlestown October ye 14th Day is 1765

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To the Honbl. Sir. William Johnson

{rotate 90} Charleston 8[ ] 1765 Letter from an Indn. of that places

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[Kittagusta] Manuscript Document to [Alexander Cameron and George Price], May 8, 1766; Fort Prince George, [South Carolina]

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"642"

At a Congress at Fort Prince George 8th May 1766 Present Alexander Cameron Esqr. Deputy agent for the Cherokee Indians: Ensign George Price Commanding Officer of Fort P.G. Kittagusta or the Prince of Chotch held Beloved Man of the Cherokee Nation, Juds Friend & many other HeadMen & Warriors of the upper Middle & lower Cherokee Towns; when Kittagusta Addressed himself to Mr. Cameron & Mr. Price as follows.

Brothers

I am to utter the united Voice of my Nation to you, & to desire you to make our Father Captain Stuart his Majestys Agent & Superintendant of Indian Affairs, acquainted as soon as possible with my Speech. we returned yesterday from marking the Boundary line between South Carolina & our Country, a Task of Fatigue, but nevertheless agreeable, as our Brothers who are Settled on the Frontiers of that Province & we can never now have any disputes about Land;

At our meeting with you here in October last we proposed a Line also on the North Carolina & Virginia side we repeat it once more & desire to have it extended, from where that of South Carolina Terminates, upon the Reedy River a Straight Course to Colonel Chiswells Mines which will be a just Boundary & the only one we Can Allow of; The number of Familys that have come from North Carolina & Virginia & settled upon a great Part of our best lands & the bold inroads of a few that are neither an easy days march from our Towns, are circumstances very alarming to us; therefore we shall be ready at the end of the Fifth moon ( ie Septr.) from this time to attend at the marking a line, our minds will not be easy till it is Compleated, & if our Brothers will not be assisting in it, then we must Effect it ourselves.

When our Father Captain Stuart remembers, that he was at the Congress at August as held in 1763 where were also present the four Governors of Virginia, No. & South Carolina & Georgia, when the great Kings proclamation Relative to his Red Children was Read to us & we were promised

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promised quiet Possession of our Lands & redress of our Grievances That we might claim the land a great way beyond where we propose to Run the Line, but Chuse much Rather to part with it than have any disputes concerning it; & that we are a poor People dependant upon the Woods for our Support, & without the means of redressing ourselves but by Violence which we do not Choose to exercise against our Brothers. He will Certainly write to the Governors of Virginia & North Carolina urging Strongly the Reasonableness of our demand & the Necessity of sending People of Consequence to meet us to put it in execution.

Here a String of Beads was given

Brothers

What I have now to say is also to be sent to our Father Captain Stuart. Our Enemy from the Northward has attacked us this year in all parts of our Country in greater Numbers & more frequent that we have ever known. we desire to know if they are Sett on by any Body & by whom. We know they Trade with the English & from them get their Hatchets which are very Sharp, & have been lifted up against White as well as Red Men in our Nation. We beg the favour of our Father Captain Stuart, to Contrive that they may be told that the Cherokees send to ask for a Peace from their Town House in Chote where Peace has been made before. Belts of Whampum & Pipes exchanged, & Tobacco smoaked.

We will send to them ourselves & employ other Nations with whom we are at Peace to sue for us & shall be glad if it can be obtained, but if not we hope our Brothers will take their Hatchetts back again.

Here another String of Beads was given.

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B[enjamin] Roberts ALS to William Johnson, September 18, 1766; Niagara

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Niagara 18 Sepr.1766

Sir

I am thank god a little recovered tho. I have yet a convulsed cough & a pain in my head. I intended going to wait on you. but I see that everything will be in confusion in my absence. Capt Browne I thought was for a reconciliation for I represented. the impropriety of having so many farmyards in the lower town & a large Rack of Hay. he order a Court of Enquiry. that reported twas improper. that Soldiers should live amongst the Traders. but that the Hay was in no more danger of fire than the Huts. Capt Browne ordered the Soldiers to be in the Fort

He insists on seeing every Indian that comes here. He has order'd all the traders to give in a return of their powder. says they shall keep but two pounds in their houses the rest must be put in the Magazine for no reason he has abused some of them. Mr. Pfister who knows his behavior can give you an account of him.

I have sent DeCongne this day to enquire after the Oxen & desire the Seneca's may bring the Herdes back I think it right to wait their answer tho. I should pass my time disagreably. for my part I avoid every means of jealousy or dispute. I am only uneasy that the Authority you vested me with should be tram

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B[enjamin] Roberts ALS to William Johnson, December 3, 1766; Niagara

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I hear that before day the 30th past a Batteau sat out for Fort Erie & that the Same Morning a Canoe with two Indians was seen Crossing towards the great Island. This is the best Information I could procure. I am Confident by now Seeing the Seneca & Mississague Indians bringing in peltry to pay their Debts. that they are not bent on any mischief nor have I any reason to Suspect any other Nation. therefore must think the vesell burnt bty accident I am. & To Capt Comt. (coppy)

My Private opinion is that these soldiers that set off before day with a very cold Wind & Snow in their face Stopd on board the vessell after crossing to the Island which takes them generally an Hour. These Chaps went off Early to Celebrate St. Andrew at a Dinner provided at Fort Erie which made me the more Circumspect in giving my Opinion. I let it to themselves to Judge as they are all of the Nation.

I am much distress'd in not receiving a Line from you since 4 from the Congress. Capt Brown Orders DeConagne about preemtarily orders that every Indian of what Nation I know shall be brought before him. I am afraid it will be of no Service to his Majesty that these people should be forced to appear before the Commandant who gives them nothing. & whose discourse only Tends to make himself the great man. & your responses contradict (?) nobody. I shall do my utmost not to come to an open rupture yet can not allow the Service or your Authority to be entirely laid aside

We agree very well as Mr. Roberts & Mr Brown but when the Commissary has any request, theres such difficulties as Amount to a denyal

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B[enjamin] Roberts ALS to William Johnson, December 24, 1766; Niagara

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Niagara 24 Dec 1766

Sir

My concern is inexpressible by not hearing from you You'll see by my Journal which, I now send you, how necessary 'twould be, that I should have some Certain rule for my Conduct, If the Comanding officer has a right to Command me, & these under me. I should know it. this very instant I am in distress for my Interpreter that is detained at Capt. Brown's who is constantly ordering him thro & Fro. I think from Mr Collinds beheavior in Supporting. so Strong an Interest for Shrienar, I think he is not entitled to a pass for trade, which if not already on the way to him, hope you'll prevent the governor giving him one.

I find that If Frazier had gone up to Fort Erie, he would have been Severely handled. Mr. Carpenter told me he would not have answered if any such Bum Bailif Rascale had arrived. Tho Capt. Brown writes such polite leters offering assistance & yet I see every precaution taken to pre -vent its having effect. I believe the Traders are convinced I have done my utmost for them & have been indifattigable in the executions of my office, at the same time as polite & respectfull to the Comd. officer as possible

DeConagne who is just now left him says he seems to lay a great Stress upon Letters not coming to hand. & says he believes you think a great deal. I dont know what he means but he has told DeConagne he has or will give an order he shant go out of this Fort without acquainting him. So it seems he has look'd upon it, as nothing, my acquainting him he was going along with me If

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If I could advise the General that post at Fort Erie should be abandon'd & little Niagara establish'd it will every winter be a nest for Smugling. & in the Comd. offr. will put what goods he can on board the Vessell. as may be ascertain'd by the Small Cargoes, that have been Carried to Detroit. so should any accident happen to detain the Vessell till late next Season. Michilimackinac at least must be abandoned, the present Commandant says. let the Sentrys be ever so Alert. he with three men could take the Fort for with reason he should take the better Care I told him as by his own account some Indians had been roughly handled there There is one McCarty who Interpreted for you at this place. who lives among the Indians about 10 Leagues from that place, on the Lake side he has a very bad Character I shall try to get him down to you in the Spring. I hear he recd. large presents from Pollerd last year

Sally Mentour has built a Hut & Trades opposite to Fo Erie. I hear that Shrienar at arrival of Pollerds Express went over to her house & that the Sergt. of the Fort had Orders not to let any Stranger into it. Mr. Carpenter said, when I shew'd him Capt Brown's Order. he was much surprised he should give such a one, that his former business down to Niagara was to settle about Shrienars, staying at Fort Erie, wch he thought settled & wondered C. Brown. could act so contrary

The situation of my affairs at present forces me to be very explicit at present. (tho there are numberless little Slights & Insults thrown on the Department would be too tedious to enumerate) If you

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Choptank and Amos Ogden Manuscript Document and ANS to English Deputies, August 12, 1767; Nanticoke

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Brothers.

We learn from you that you have come a great way to see us, and we think it right to tell you that we are obliged and thank you for this friendly visit.

Brothers,

You see we are not rich, but we have some Tenants, who pays us for the use of our Lands; these lands you desire us to sell, and go with you. but we can't tell that this would be so well, as we live comfortably upon the Rents of our Lands, but if we part with our Lands and go with you, we shall have nobody to work for us, as our Tenants do, and our old people cannot hunt nor make Corn, and we are fearful that these old people wou'd starve if they go into a strange land.

Brothers-

For these Reasons we cannot sell our Lands, but if we were willing to sell our Lands we do not know that we cou'd sell them , or that in Justice we ought to do it. Our forefathers held these Lands as long as Death wou'd let them live, when Death took our forefathers away, they left these same Lands to their Children, and said, live upon them, and your Children as long as You and any of your Children is alive; We have follow'd their advice which we find has been good and therefore untill our Brothers of the Six Nations can shew us that it will be for our Benefit to remove, we cannot think of deserting our Town.

Brothers

We are told by you, that you have come a great Distance to see us, we are very glad to see you and shake Hands with You; We welcome you once more to our Town, It pains us to think how far you have travelled, and what pain you must have been put in, especially if your Money did not hold out. Of this Brothers we

Last edit 12 months ago by anneec
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