Great Britain Indian Department Collection, 1753-1795

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Mr. Street Manuscript Document Copy, "Memo of the Settlements in the Indian Country", to John Johnson, [after 1791]; s.l.

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The Americans Settled on the Six Nation Land, upon Genesee River, can come by the way of the Three River within Seven Miles of Canandaigue Lake, where they have laid out a County Town, from whence they have a Land Carriage of about 20 Miles, to the Genesee river, and from the Waters which put into Canandaigue Lake, they have a Land Carriage of about Eight or Nine Miles into a Branch of the Susquehanna, which runs through Tyoga, where there is a Town under the Government of Pensylvania.... They complain of the Hardship of not being allowed to pass the Post of Oswego with their provisions and farming utensils. and do find it the Cheapest rout Still, for the Settlers on the Genesee River to Cross the Carrying place about Eight Miles Across to Sodus, which brings them into Lake Ontario, and Consi= =quently enables them to go up the Genesee River by a Carrying Place of about 2 1/2 Miles at the Genesee Falls by Water to all the Western and most of the Southern parts of the Purchase.- They also go out of Lake Ontario into {it looks like Erundajat but I can find nothing like that. Perhaps Irondeqoit?}, Bay and Creek about 8 Miles into a different part of Country, where the Settlements have already begun, they are indeed Settled on Almost every part of the purchase Except the South West Corner.- but principally on the Genesee River, and on the East line Adjoining the New York or [ ] Lands. Some few have Crossed the Genesee River and Settled on the West Side, and Built Mills on the upper Genesee Falls,...... Their prospect Seems to be of Benifiting themselves, by their Superior Advantage over the Lower parts of the State in raising Stock which will Carry itself to the Sea ports, and put them upon a footing with their Neighbours in furnishing Beef Pork and Horses for the West India Islands.-

They have a Salt Works Erected at the [Onoudays?] Salt Springs, which produces them

Last edit about 1 year ago by anneec
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them upwards of 30 Bushels per day when properly Attended...._

Last edit 2 months ago by MaryV
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Mr Streets Memo {unclear punctuation} of the Settlements in the Indian Country __________________ for......._

Sir John Johnson {flourish}

Last edit about 1 year ago by anneec

Shawanese and Delawares Manuscript Letter Copy to "Father", June 11, 1792; Grand Glaize

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[Text in Top Right] Grand Glaize 11th June 1792

Father, The two Speeches, that accompany this, We are at a loss what answers to return to. We alone here can do nothing but all the Wariors of the different Nations meet at the Mahigan Town, when we all meet we will tell them to abandon this side of the Ohio if they expect peace.

We commence our Campaign with the Siege of Fort Jefferson and if it should please the Great Spirit to grant us success we will send in our answer by the Prisoners. As we have sent you all the Speeches you will see what they tell us. These are our intentions at present, but we want your advice, send us it that it may overtake us at the Mahigan town. We imagine they mean to dupe us as usual, but we mean to be ready to receive them.-

This day the first of us left this place, and we have sent word to the Potowatamies and to those at the foot of the Rapids to meet us at the above mentioned place, be strong therefore and push on those of your children that are nigh Detroit. -

Father, You told us you would supply our families with provisions, they are now left and now is the time, send it out as soon as you can and as much as possible. As we wish to do something before we return we do not expect to be back soon.-

Do everything for us in your power and if it can be done prevail upon the Traders amongst us to bring it from the Rapids. -

[Text in bottom right] We

Last edit 12 months ago by anneec
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We wanted White hat to go along with us to write our Answer to the Americans, but as he has told us he cannot go, send us out some person from Detroit for that purpose that he may overtake us at the Mahigan town

Speech of the Shawanese and Delawares at the Glaize.

(a true Copy)

Thomas Duggan Clk Ind: Dept.-

Last edit 12 months ago by anneec
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Grand Glaize 11th June 1792

Copy of Speech from the Shawanoes [?] & Delawares to their Father at Detroit

Last edit 12 months ago by anneec

Chiefs of the Seven Nations LS Copy to [George Washington], October 2, 1795; Fort George, New York

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[left side note] From the Chiefs of the Seven Nations to the President of the U. States Lake George 2 October 1795 Copied [/left side note]

[middle note] Copie of a Letter - Sent from the Chiefs of the Seven Nations to the President of the United States - [/middle note]

[corner label] #741 [/corner label]

Last edit 4 months ago by mementomerry
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[languages: English and a Native American Language]

To his Excellency Gorge Washington or Jefferson President of the United States _

O na ta ga [unclear]laes[/unclear] Brother _ We the Chiefs of the Seven Nations of Canaday and this State of New York _

Brother _ we have had a talk with our brothers of the State of New York _ and Mr. Wadsworth woh told us he was sent by you to talk with us Conserning our Lands in the state of New York _

Brother _ we stated our Claim of Lands to them and they objected our wrights and said that thay Never Knewn we climed any Lands, in the State of New York _

Brother _ we then told them that we was not able to Consent to thane [unclear] to us which the desired us to Inform you of and promised us Looke wise that they would aquaint you of what post believed us and them while in councell at Fort Gorge _

Brother _ we told them at our Parting with them that as they said they had done as far as the had been Derected by thane older brothers who sent them hear to talk with us on this subject that was to give us some small Compens -ation for our "Lands, which is ours is now and Ever was from thay Beginning of the World _

Brother _ we asked for nothing but what is our Just wrights and we have that Sincere Confidance in your Honour and Goodness of doing Justice to all People _ that we are fully Convinced that You will See Justice done us _

Brother _ we have only to let you Know that in the Cause of this winter Coming When your Congrass meets that _ we Shall Send Color Leeves and Some other of our

Last edit 5 months ago by Bob Bonn
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{signatures of the Indians spelled phonetically}

our Chiefs together with William Gray our Interpeter and Shall Impower them to act for us so far that Every thing so that is agreed on by them with you will Stand a Justice to us. if the Grate Spiret Pleses to preserve them so far they are the Persons we shall Send to you for Justice to be done us, if god Pleses to Disanble them in body so that thay cannot come to you in behalf of Us we Shall Send thare Sones.

Brother _ we have no more to say at Preasent but to hope that these few Lines may find You Enjoying _ Your Halth with all your Famaly and all others _ with Whomee you are connected _ From your _ Brothers the Chiefs of the Seven Nations of Canady and State of New York _

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Fort Gorge October 2 1795

To ona ta gar nias Brother President of the United States of Amarica _

his + o na sa te gen _ mark

oh na we io _ Atia to ha von (?) Sa te ga ien tan ~ on wa neen te _ ti o na to gen a _ oh ni ta _ oh gere Sen _

Last edit 5 months ago by Bob Bonn

Silas Charles DS Copy to Cadwallader Colden, Undated; Province of New York

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To the Honourable Cadwallader Colden Esqr: his Majestys Lieutenant Governor and Commander in Chief of the Province of New York and the Territories there on depending in America {?symbol} {?symbol} {?symbol} In Council {?symbol}

The Petition of Silas Charles an Indian in Behalf of himself and other Indians.

Most humbly Sheweth.

That your Petitioner & those Indians con:cerned with him constitute a Tribe commonally distinguished by the Name of the Montawk Indians, and are the Remains of a Numerous Tribe formerly inhabiting the East End of Nassau Island and con - stitute at present about thirty Families.

That upon the coming of the English into this Country the Ancestors of the Present Montawk Indians granted divers Parcels of their Land to the People Who formed a Township now called East Hampton.

That this Tribe continued to reside in the Neighbourhood living principally by Planting Fishing and Fowling gradually wasting away and those Who remain now occupy a Tract upon Montawk Point

That of late Years these Indians have discontinued their Ancient Barbarian Way of Living and are become not only civilized but christianized and are peaceable and Orderly and willing to behave as good Subjects [?to] his Majesty King George the Third & his Heirs and

Last edit about 1 year ago by Dennis K
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