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Discourse 1891-10-04 [D-58]

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were the nature, powers, duties and responsibilities of the Priesthood. Those on whom it is conferred are measurably responsible for the salvation of the people, and will be held accountable to the Lord for the manner in which they use the authority confided to them. Business cares will not stand as an excuse for not responding to the calls of duty in connection with the calling of the Priesthood. We are living in a time when the love of the world prevails, and great care has to be taken lest the callings of the Priesthood be lost sight of by this feeling. Greater care should be taken in providing employment for the people, and means should be adopted for that purpose. It would probably be a good thing to have missionaries called to devote their time to laboring among the people in Zion, visiting them at their homes and looking after their spiritual and temporal welfare. Those who hold the Priesthood should refrain from all conduct that is improper, and should exercise an influence for peace, acting in all kindness and brotherly love. It is not in keeping with the genius of the Gospel to indulge in anger, which leads to wrong and sometimes breaks up friendships that have existed for years. The brethren should govern their families in love, avoiding all forms of harshness. The instructions and ideas presented were clear and pointed, and a good spirit was present in the meeting.

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Discourse 1845-04-06 [D-228]

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troubled the churches were removed, and the principles are now much inquired after, and he felt assured that with wisdom and prudence much might be done, especially if more labourers were employed. 170Elder Thomas Margetts stated that the Leicestershire conference was not in so good a condition as he could wish to see it. The experience of the last six months had been very trying, but after all profitable. When an aspiring spirit arises, it is calculated to do much mischief; it had been so there, but the results he had no doubt would be beneficial; but notwithstanding all things, the prospects were still better than ever, and their congregations were crowded to excess. He earnestly requested a visit from some of the presidency as early as possible. 170Elder Thomas Smith stated that the Bath conference was in good standing, union and love prevailed in their midst, the gifts and blessings of the Spirit of God were abundant, the councils were conducted in peace and love, and the prospects were very encouraging. 170Elder William Walker remarked in reference to Hull, that when he was sent there, he could not in his address say brethren and sisters, for there was but one sister there. He continued his labours by preaching at the dock side to hundreds of people, but apparently in vain. He was at times almost in despair, but nevertheless he received encouragement from the word of God, and continued his labours. He remarked also that the books of the church had been a great instrumentality in propagating the work in that neighbourhood. The prospects were now encouraging, and the minds of the people were in some measure turned to the contemplation of the principles of truth. 170Elder Dan Jones, from Wales, rose, under an attack of the fever and ague, and remarked that he believed it was the intention of the evil one to prevent him speaking that evening, but he was determined to bear his testimony in spite of every opposing power. He said that he came not in the character of a delegate: he represented no conference; for if he had but baptized one, he should be able to represent three. But he would speak of a nation renowned in history, one of the most ancient nations of the earth, who had never been subdued, and to whom he hoped to be instrumental in bearing the tidings of the work of God, in the last days. He enlarged on the characteristics of his people in a manner, and with an eloquence, that told how ardently he loved his native tribe and his father-land. He remarked that, for many years, as a mariner, he had been in search of the principles of truth—he had sought it in almost every clime—among the red men of the woods, or the civilized denizens of the city, but he had found it not until he came in contact with the followers of the prophet of the Lord, the notorious Joseph Smith; but of that despised individual he would bear his testimony, and though he might feel more at home among a tribe of Indians, or on the deck of a ship, than upon that platform and before such an audience, yet he would not flinch from bearing a faithful testimony to the character of the servant of the Lord. He had been with him in the domestic circle, he had been with him in peril and in prison, and only left him about an hour before the murderous deed of his assassination was perpetrated; and he had now come in obedience to the counsel of the martyred prophet, as a messenger to his native land, to bear testimony of the work for which his brother had died, and which he had sealed with his blood. [We would here remark that we are utterly incapable of doing anything like justice to the address of Captain Jones, for though delivered while struggling with disease, such was its effect upon ourselves, and we also believe upon others, that we ceased to write, in order to give way to the effect produced upon our feelings.] 170Elder William Henshaw stated that Merthyr Tydvill conference was in a prosperous condition. Two years ago he first went there and met with much opposition; but some became obedient to the gospel, and the signs followed the believers; gifts, blessings, and visions were in their midst, and the saints were rejoicing in the fulness of the gospel of Jesus Christ. 170 - 171Elder Wilford Woodruff then rose to represent his conference, to which he had pledged himself at an early part of the day. He said that he represented about twenty-eight states of the American Union, above one hundred thousand saints, a quorum of twelve apostles, the various quorums in the stakes of Zion, fifteen

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that the Derbyshire conference was in a good condition at present, but much in need of some active labourer. 169Elder George Simpson stated that there was not that union in the Staffordshire conference which was necessary for the well-being of the church, he hoped they would take his conference into consideration, and that measures might be taken for their assistance. 169Elder John Banks stated that he had not had much time to become acquainted with the Edinburgh conference, having only been there about three weeks. Edinburgh was a splendid city, the seat of much wisdom and learning, and it would require much wisdom and prudence to be exercised; but considering all circumstances, he trusted that the coming year would yield them a rich harvest. 169Elder Richard Blakey stated that the Garway conference had many difficulties to contend with, but still it was in a better condition than he had known it before. He should wish to call the attention to this conference as he was at present under the necessity of retiring from his labours in the vineyard, in order to assist an aged father, whose growing infirmities called for his help. 169Elder James Houston stated that the branches in the Glasgow conference were in a very prosperous condition, full of union and love in their counsels; Lanerk, where be had been labouring, numbered 64 in about six months; he was sorry that he was not better able to represent the whole conference, as its general condition was most satisfactory and encouraging. 169Elder James Ure briefly stated that the Sheffield conference was in a very cheering condition. 169Elder E. F. Sheets remarked that the Bradford conference at his first visit rather alarmed him, but he thought he could now state that it was in very good order, and he knew not of a dissenting voice in the whole of the three branches of Bradford, Idle, and Leeds; more labourers were wanted, and he anticipated much good would be the result. 169Elder Thomas Smith said in reference to the Worcestershire Conference, that in its present condition, love and union were prevailing through the whole, with the exception of one case of difficulty, which would come before the meeting. Brother Meynell had been visiting them and they had an excellent time. The conference spread over an extensive country, and it was their intention to labour indefatigably in the coming season. 169The meeting then adjourned until evening. 169EVENING SERVICE. 169The service opened by singing. Prayer by Elder Hedlock, when the representation of the condition of the conferences was resumed. 169Elder Stratton stated that generally speaking the branches were in a prosperous condition, that four new branches had been organized these last few months. The Isle of man branches were in a much better state, united, and the prospects were good. 169Elder Speakman stated that the Clitheroe conference was in good standing, peace and unity, and every good grace was to be found amongst them, none could be more inclined to adhere to counsel. They were a people that were full of humility which had caused him much to rejoice; they were also ever ready to assist in rolling forward the kingdom of God, and they only need to be told their duty in order to do it. 169Elder John Johnson said he had not been in the habit of speaking before so large and respectable a congregation, but rather in the regions of darkness, and amongst the blacks of the coalpit. He was, however, glad to say that though Cheltenham had, as it were, been torn up by the roots by persons who had never been sent there, yet he rejoiced to say that now the people were willing to listen to counsel, and the spirit of love and union was in their midst, indeed their condition was better than it had been for three years, and there was a great work to do. 169Elder Robert Martin said that the members in the Bedfordshire conference, with very few exceptions, were Saints indeed, many of them were of long standing. A good foundation had been laid, and the difficulties that had for a considerable time

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168Elder Hedlock then spoke on the purpose of a general conference, and the necessity of unity of feeling and action, and of order in the conferences, remarking that branches raised up since last conference cannot form themselves into conferences without the decision of a general conference, and persons seeking to render themselves independent of those who were appointed by the last general conference, are out of order, and violating the laws of the kingdom of God. He remarked that the presiding elders of branches should be associated with the officers of those branches in doing all things in righteousness for rolling onward the kingdom of God; and also, that the presidents of conferences should be united with the presiding officers of branches in the same great cause. Thus should all be united in the great purpose in which they were engaged, viz., the salvation of the human family The occasional offences that arise from individuals whose minds are too contracted to grasp the sublimity of the subject of salvation, we should learn to endure, and exercise forgiveness rather than raise an obstacle against the progress of the work. He exhorted the audience to exert themselves to live as saints to day, and if such was their continued purpose, they would not err very far from the path of rectitude. 168The president then called for the delegates to represent the condition and standing of the conferences. 168Elder Milton Holmes stated the Manchester conference to be in a very good condition; the prospects, indeed, were very cheering, perhaps more so than at any other period, and every thing seemed to foretell the reaping of a rich harvest. He exhorted the saints to listen to the counsel given, and bore a strong testimony to the truth of the work. 168Elder Leonard Hardy stated that he had not long been connected with the Preston conference, but the prospects to the best of his knowledge were much improved. The officers in council were united, and there was a probability of some being baptized. He also bore testimony to the truth, and prayed for the success of the work. 168Elder Elisha H. Davis rose to state the condition of the London conference, which he said was very satisfactory at the present time. They had witnessed the gradual increase of the church, and of very respectable people of the congregations that were seeking after the truth. The officers were but few, but they were doing good, and though the Saints themselves were generally speaking but poor, yet they were determined to press forward and be united in the work of the Lord. The spirit of the gathering was very powerful among them, many had already left for Zion, and many more were very anxious to go. The meetings were well attended, and some were baptized weekly, He requested an interest in the prayers of the Saints, that he might be endued with wisdom and prudence; the enemies were on the alert to detect, if possible, any thing that might be thought a false step, and without the prayers and faith of the Saints, he felt quite incompetent for the task devolving upon him. 168Elder Galley stated that the Macclesfield conference, from the past year's experience, was much improved, and never had the Spirit of God given stronger testimony of the truth than these last three months. The officers were united in desiring the glory of God. He further stated that the conference was extensive as regarded the distances of places, and that his circumstances in business did not allow him to pay that attention to it which it required, that other labourers were much wanted, and he requested that some travelling elder or high priest might be sent amongst them. 168 - 169Elder Robert Crook rose to report the condition of the Birmingham conference, and we rejoiced much to see our aged brother manifesting almost the agility of youth. He stated that he rejoiced much to see the Saints by whom he was surrounded, and he rejoiced also at the condition in which he had left his conference, their councils were in peace—unity and love prevailed amongst them. He also rejoiced much in the late visit of elder J. B. Meynell, and thanked God for his visit, and he was very sorry that he was leaving England, for he knew they were of one heart and of one mind. He exhorted his brethren to be loyal subjects of the realm, stating that he prayed for her majesty the Queen three times a day, until the magistrates themselves declared him to be a most loyal subject. He also stated that the Derbyshire conference was in a good condition at present, but much in need of some active labourer. 169Elder George Simpson stated that there was not that union in the Staffordshire conference which was necessary for the well-being of the church, he hoped they would take his conference into consideration, and that measures might be taken for their assistance.

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166 GENERAL CONFERENCE. GENERAL CONFERENCE. SUNDAY MORNING.

Millennial Star No. 11. April, 1845. Vol. V.

This annual and most interesting meeting was held on the 6th of April, in the Hall of Science, Manchester. The day being favourable, a very large assembly congregated from the neighbouring branches, who, together with the numerous delegates from different parts of the country, filled the commodious hall, and presented a very pleasing appearance. 166The meeting being called to order at half-past ten o'clock by elder Milton Holmes, it was carried unanimously that elder Wilford Woodruff preside, and that elder William Walker, and elder J. B. Meynell act as clerks of the conference. 166The sixteenth hymn being sung, elder Woodruff offered up prayer, when the first hymn was sung, after which the number of officers present was called for, when it appeared, of the presidency, elder W. Woodruff, one of the Quorum of the Twelve, Counsellors Reuben Hedlock and Thomas Ward—High Priests, eight—of the Quorum of the Seventies, five—Elders, seventy-seven—Priests, sixty-six—Teachers, thirty-seven—Deacons, seven. 166Elder Woodruff having made some remarks to the delegates as to the order of representation, the delegates were called upon to make their respective statements. 166Manchester Conference—Represented by elder Milton Holmes, including 24 branches, viz., Manchester, Stockport, Ashton, Dukenfield, Newton Moor, Mottram, Bolton, Tottington, Leith, Haslingden, Breightmet Fold, Bury, Oldham, Rochdale, Eccles, Pendlebury, Heatons, Ratcliff, Cross Moor, Didsbury, Edgeworth Moor, Middleton, Crompton Fold, and Whitefield, containing 1723 members, 2 high priests, 55 elders, 99 priests, 51 teachers, 25 deacons; baptized since last general conference, 279. 166Liverpool Conference—Represented by elder J. A. Stratton, including 13 branches, viz., Liverpool, Dauglas, Peel (Isle of Man), St. Helens, Newton, Warrington, Tranmere, Ewloe, Kennerton, Chester, Overton, Wooton, Pool Quay, containing 678 members, 3 high priests, 31 elders, 39 priests, 21 teachers, 10 deacons; baptized since last general conference, 120. 166Preston Conference—Represented by elder Leonard Hardy, including 10 branches, viz., Preston, Lancaster, Kendal, Brigsteer, Holme, Heskin, Hunter's Hill, Euxton, Leyland, Southport, and Longton, including 505 members, 16 elders, 24 priests, 15 teachers, 4 deacons; baptized since last general conference, 21. 166London Conference—Represented by elder E. H. Davis, including 5 branches, viz., London, Newbury, Woolwich, Luton, and Portsmouth, containing 328 members, 12 elders, 17 priests, 8 teachers, and 9 deacons; baptized since last general conference, 55. 166Macclesfield Conference—Represented by elder James Galley, including 7 branches, viz., Macclesfield, Bollington, Middlewich, Northwich, Plumbley, Crewe, and Little Budworth, containing 204 members, 1 high priest, 9 elders, 19 priests, 12 teachers, 4 deacons; baptized since last general conference, 13. 166Birmingham Conference—Represented by elder Robert Crook, including 14 branches, viz., Birmingham, Gritsgreen, Oldbury, West Bromwich, Walsall, Dudley, Brittle Lane, Bilston, Kidderminster. Bloxwich, Rockshill, Rewbury Hill, Wolverhampton, and Shatterford, containing 668 members, 1 high priest, 35 elders, 54 priests, 31 teachers, 15 deacons; baptized since last general conference, 146. 166Derbyshire Conference—Represented by elder Robert Crook, including 5 branches, viz., Wooden Box, Dunstall, Branston, Barton, Colesville; baptized since last general conference, 112. 166Staffordshire Conference—Represented by elder Geo. Simpson, including 15 branches, viz., Burslem, Hanley, Stoke-upon-Trent, Newcastle, Baddeley Edge, Bradley Green, Knutton Heath, Longton, Coxbank, Prees, Tunstall, Leek, Longport, Hassall Green, Allsagar's Bank, and Whitchurch. 166Edinburgh Conference—Represented by elder John Banks, including 11 branches, viz., Edinburgh, East Wemyss, Stirling, Pathhead, Falkirk, Hunter's Fold, Croft Head, Ternent, Dundee, Biggar; baptized since last quarterly conference, 12. 166 - 167Glasgow Conference—Represented by elder James Houston, including 16 branches, viz., Glasgow, Airdrie, Lanark, Paisley, Johnston, Bridge of Weir, Kilbirnie, Irvine, Kilmarnock, Greenock, Balfrone, Bonhill

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Bonhill, Campsie, Thornley Bank, Tollcross, Renfrew; baptized since last general conference, 236. 167Sheffield Conference—Represented by elder J. Ure, including 7 branches, viz., Sheffield, Mattersea, Grindley, Woodhouse, Doncaster, Donnington, Chesterfield; baptized since last general conference, 100. 167Bradford Conference—Represented by E. F. Sheets, including 3 branches, viz., Bradford, Idle, and Leeds, containing 181 members, 7 elders, 11 priests, 5 teachers, 5 deacons; baptized since last general conference, 47. 167Worcestershire Conference—Represented by elder Thomas Smith, including Earl's-common, Bromsgrove, Persell Green, Worcester, Penvin, Flyford Flavel, Barford, St. John's, Milton, Royal Leamington Spa, Stratford-upon-Avon, Coventry, containing 270 members, 12 elders, 20 priests, 8 teachers, 5 deacons; baptized since last general conference, 105. 167Clitheroe Conference—Represented by elder William Speakman, including 11 branches, viz., Clitheroe, Waddington, Chatburn, Downham, Settle, Burnley, Accrington, Goodshaw Fold, Blackburn, Chaighley, Ribchester, containing 302 members, 15 elders, 18 priests, 18 teachers, 6 deacons; baptized since last general conference, 27. 167Leicestershire Conference—Represented by elder Thomas Margetts, including 3 branches, viz., Leicester, Nottingham, Blabey, containing 140 members, 6 elders, 10 priests, 2 teachers, 3 deacons; baptized since last general conference, 72. 167Chellenham Conference—Represented by elder John Johnson, including 9 branches, viz., Cheltenham, Apperley, Narton, Frogsmarsh, Brangreen, Puncill, Little Dean Woodside, Edgehill, Sydney; baptized since last general conference, 64. 167Bath Conference—Represented by elder Thomas Smith, including 2 branches, viz., Bath and Downhead, containing 108 members, 3 elders, 8 priests, 1 teacher, 1 deacon; baptized since last general conference, 69. 167>Bedfordshire Conference—Represented by elder Robert Martin, including 12 branches, viz., Bedford, Thorncote, Gravely, Whaddon, Evershott, Walden, North Crawley, Stock, Wyboston, Honeydon, Irchester, Wellingborough; Baptized since last general conference, 36. 167Carlisle Conference—Represented by elder 167John Allen, including 5 branches, viz., Carlisle, Brampton, Alston Moor, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Sunderland, containing 150 members, (number of officers not reported.) 167Littlemoor Branch—Represented by elder Thomas Smith, of Bath, including 12 members, 1 elder, 1 teacher, 1 deacon; baptized since last general conference 6. 167Merthyr Tydville Conference—Represented by elder William Henshaw, including 12 branches, containing 316 members, 7 elders, 10 priests, 7 teachers, 4 deacons; baptized since last general conference, 195. 167Mars Hill Conference—Represented by elder G. P. Waugh, including 24 branches, viz., Mars Hill, Old Storridge, Coles Green, Wooferhood, Brinxty Common, Bromyards Down, Whitbourne, Clifton, Ridgeway Cross, Polehouse, Key's End Street, Ledbury, Froomshill, Darlow and Stanley Hill, Stocks Lane, Shucknell Hills, Lugwardine, Hereford, Leominster, Ludlow, Stoke, St. Melbro', Bellsgates, Combs Moor, Presteign; baptized since since last general conference, 36. 167Hull Conference—Represented by elder William Walker, including 6 branches, containing 74 members, 5 elders, 5 priests, 6 teachers, 2 deacons; baptized since last general conference, 36. 167Wapload—Represented by elder George Eyre, including 17 members, 1 priest; baptized since last general conference, 17. 167Ireland—Represented by letter, contains 33 members, 3 elders, 2 priests, 1 teacher; baptized 1. 167Garway Conference—Represented by elder Richard Blakey, including 5 branches, viz., Garway, Oriop, Buckhold, Ewiasharold, Keevern, containing 136 members, 3 elders, 10 priests, 4 teachers, 1 deacon; baptized, 4. 167Chalford Hill Conference—Represented by elder E. H. Webb, including 8 branches, viz., Chalford, Avening, Tetbury, King's-hood, Cam, Chapel Allerton, Canterbury, containing 154 members, 5 elders, 10 priests, 6 teachers, 3 deacons; baptized since last general conference, 88. 167Bristol—Represented by letter, contains 90 members, 3 elders, 6 priests, 3 teachers, 1 deacon; baptized since last general conference, 10. 167Trowbridge and vicinity, containing 9 members, 1 elder; baptized since last general conference, 9. 167The meeting being closed by singing and prayer, adjourned until the afternoon. 167AFTERNOON SERVICE. 167Meeting opened by singing the 142nd hymn, after which elder Ward engaged in prayer. The sacrament was then administered by elder J. D. Ross. 167Elder Ward made a few remarks upon the necessity of attending upon the ordinance of the Lord's supper.

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quorums of the seventies, a conference with two temples of the Lord, one long ago completed, and one fast hastening to its completion. After enumerating many other things, which, from the rapidity of his utterance, we failed to note, he remarked that the condition of the churches in America was more encouraging than at any former period in the history of the church.—The Saints were more universally of one heart and one mind, and the Spirit of Elijah's God was in their midst. He then addressed himself to the elders and officers by whom he was surrounded, exhorting them in all cases to abide by the laws of the land, and, that no man, by keeping the laws of the kingdom of God, need violate the laws of the realm: that no one who infringed upon those laws in any manner would be sustained by the authorities of the church. We had nothing to do with the laws but to keep them. He further remarked that elders, generally, raised up churches like unto themselves, and therefore it behoved them to be an example to their flocks in all things that were holy and righteous. The kingdom of God was a kingdom of order, and a spirit of order ought to characterise every branch of the church. He rejoiced much in assembling with them that day, and in meeting such a vast concourse of brethren and sisters as greeted his eyes that day: he rejoiced also to find things throughout the land in so good a condition as they were. He further exhorted the Saints not to be discouraged by their trials, but to contemplate the course of the Saviour, from the manger to the cross; he sought not for peace and popularity, but for the salvation of men. It was no sign, because men were poor that they could not be useful and successful in propagating the principles of truth: let us but remember from whence our power comes, and forget not, what elder Ward often endeavours to teach us, that union is strengh, that the grand secret of our success lies in being of one heart and of one mind; but, that on the contrary, division stops all blessings, and closes the heavens against us. Yes, he would say, the heavens were full of blessings for the Saints, but union and peace amongst us could alone call them down upon us. He would, therefore, call upon them, for God's sake, to be united in all things pertaining to the rolling onward of the kingdom of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ.—The meeting was then closed with singing and prayer, and adjourned until the next morning, to assemble in the large room in Bridge-street, at ten o'clock. 171MONDAY MORNING. 171The meeting being opened by singing and prayer, elder Woodruff proceeded to speak on the great principles that should actuate the servants of the Lord, exhorting them to lay aside all principles of selfishness, and act according to counsel. To labour for the good of all, acting as one man before the Lord, in order to do the best for the welfare of the kingdom of God. 171 - 172Elder Hedlock spoke on the condition of the church in Nauvoo, how they had suffered from time to time from unrighteous men getting into their society, who had lost sight of the great principles of the kingdom of God,—and who sought only to aggrandise themselves at the expense of the entire community. Individuals had been amongst them at an early period, who had made extensive purchases of land, which had been enhanced in value by the gathering of the Saints, and thus they had taken an advantage of the people by disposing of their purchases at an exorbitant rate of profit. They had also had to suffer from various repeated law suits that had impoverished their resources, that otherwise might have been employed in providing labour for the poor. He had looked at their situation, and he felt anxious for the adoption of some plan that might mutually benefit all. He was desirous of preventing the spirit of monopoly from entering into their midst, and while he now contemplated as it were the energies of the people being thrown away amongst their enemies, he wished to adopt such means as should preserve amongst themselves the combined industry of the Saints for the good of all. He then stated his views of the objects to be accomplished, and the benefit arising from the proposed scheme of a joint stock company, that should unite the efforts of the Saints on both sides the water for the good of all. He stated that the shareholders would be benefitted by the adoption of such a plan, inasmuch as the capital so employed, by judicious management, would in a few years double its capital. He further

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remarked that there must be a channel of communication between the Saints on both sides the Atlantic for the mutual benefit of all. He further remarked that there were a variety of means by which these ends might be accomplished, by procuring freight for ships, by procuring provisions for emigration form our brethren in the West, which, placed in bond in this country, would be a great advantage in the supply of sea stores to those that emigrated. He wanted also agents in all parts of the country to assist in the business of emigration, by posting our bills when we had ships in hand, and by procuring passengers, which would afford a fair remuneration for labour on business-like principles. All that we wanted was men of business to enter into this work, which must ultimately work for the good of all. 172Elder Ward then remarked that the great point before the meeting was, whether the scheme announced in the last MILLENNIAL STAR to the conferences was to be adopted or not. 172It was then unanimously voted that such a plan or association as that proposed should be adopted. 172It was then unanimously voted that brothers Wilson, Caruthers, M'cEwan, Brown, Clark, Milnes, Mason, Banks, Johnson, and Flint, resolve themselves into a committee to draw up resolutions, to be examined and discussed by the conference, and that they retire into the adjoining room for that purpose. 172The brethren of the committee having retired, elder Woodruff called the attention of the conference to the various business lying before them in relation to the churches. 172Elder Woodruff first called for those brethren who were so situated as to give themselves up to the ministry, when there arose elders J. D. Ross, James Ure, Glaud Roger, E. H. Webb, James Houston, Robert Crook, George Slater, Thos. Margetts, E. H. Davis, John Allen, J. A. Stratton, E. F. Sheets, William Walker, C. Miller, Milton Holmes, Leonard Hardy, George Eyre, William Speakman, Thomas Day, Henry Cuerden, G. P. Waugh, Dan Jones, William Henshaw, Wm. Allen, Thomas Smith, (of Worcester), Thomas Smith, (of Bath), Phillip Westwood, Charles Phelps, Hiram Clark, John Banks, John Johnson. The three last named were added, though the brethren had retired on committee. 172The case then arose, before alluded to, in reference to the Worcestershire conference, which led to a variety of excellent teaching in reference to elders or others interfering in the settlement of difficulties where they were not sent. The adjustment of difficulties and the right of sitting in judgment belonging in an especial manner to the high priesthood, unless elders received a special commission for that purpose. 172It was then carried that the church in Coventry continue under the control of the Worcestershire conference. 172The meeting being closed by prayer, adjourned until two p.m. 172AFTERNOON SERVICE. 172This service being opened as usual, elder Ward rose to make some remarks on the responsibility of all connected with the kingdom of God. As individual members of the church we were by no means exempt from this, inasmuch as it was every man and woman's duty to warn their neighbour. And as we received any portion of the authority of the holy priesthood, that responsibility increased, and he would assure the meeting that the presidency in this land justly estimated the importance of the position they occupied, and were well aware that they were answerable to God for whatever measures they adopted in connexion with their superintendance of this portion of his vineyard; and as they had no individual or party feelings, the Saints might rest assured that all measures which they might seek to carry, would be with a single eye to the glory of God. 172Elder Hedlock then followed on the same principles. 172The condition of the Macclesfield conference was then laid before the meeting, when it was carried unanimously that elder William Walker (late of Hull) go labour there, under the presidency of elder James Galley. 172 - 173Elder Robert Crook having stated the necessity of some young active labourer

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being sent into the Derbyshire conference, it was carried that elder George Slater, late of Nauvoo, take the presidency there, recommending him to avail himself, as need might be, of the council of elder Crook. 173Staffordshire conference being next considered, it was carried that elder Hiram Clark take the presidency for the time being. 173Garway conference wanting a president, by the retirement of elder Richard Blakey, elder William Allen was unanimously voted to take the presidency thereof. 173The condition of the Mars Hill conference being brought forward, it was carried that elder E. F. Sheets (late of Bradford), preside over the same. 173It was then carried by the meeting that elder Glaud Roger preside over the Bradford conference, in the room of Brother Sheets. 173It was next unanimously voted that elder John Allen take the presidency over the Carlisle conference. 173It was also voted, that elder Robert Martin preside over the Bedfordshire conference, where he has been lately labouring. 173It was then unanimously carried, that Hull be organized into a conference, and that elder Henry Cuerden preside over the same. 173It was then, with considerable good humour, unanimously voted that elder Dan Jones, form, and preside over Wrexham conference, consisting at present only of himself and wife. Some present wished to make elder Jones a present of some branches in the neighbourhood to begin with, but the feeling of the meeting was that he should build upon no other foundation than that which he had already got. Elder Jones made some interesting remarks on his position, and of his anxiety to preach the gospel to his countrymen in their native tongue, requesting an interest in the faith and prayers of the Saints for his success,—when elder Ward arose, and called upon the meeting, if they felt disposed to uphold brother Jones in his position, to signify it by a hearty Amen! which was most heartily responded to. 173It was then voted that elder G. P. Waugh labour under the direction of elder John Banks, in the Edinburgh conference. 173It was then voted that the branches of Louth, Taleby, and Wapload, be annexed to the Hull conference, under the presidency of elder Henry Cuerden. 173Voted also that Paul Harrison be ordained an elder, and go to labour in Ireland. 173Voted that Doncaster be appended to the Sheffield conference. 173Voted that Newhall branch be annexed to the Sheffield conference. 173Voted that Kidderminster be annexed to the Worcestershire conference. 173It was then unanimously carried that elder James Houston's appointment to labour in Lanark receive the sanction of the conference. 173The meeting which continued to a late hour, without interruption, then adjourned unto Tuesday morning. 173TUESDAY. 173The meeting being opened by singing and prayer. 173Elder Webb was then called upon by the president to state the conditions of the branches in his field of labour, viz., Chalford Hill, Avening, Tetbury, Kingswood, Cam, and Nimphsfield. 173It was then carried unanimously, that the before-mentioned branches be organized into a conference, and that elder E. H. Webb preside over the same. 173It was then voted that Bath be organized into a conference, to be called the Somersetshire conference. 173It was then voted that elder George Robins go to labour in the Hull conference, under the presidency of elder Henry Cuerden. 173 - 174Elder John Johnson, president of the Cheltenham conference, being absent on the committee, elder Phelps was called upon to lay the circumstances of the conference before the meeting, in relation to a lawsuit now pending. It appeared that the Saints had been subject to interruption in their meetings of the most outrageous and disgraceful character, notwithstanding they met in a place regularly certified; that being obliged to have recourse to law in their own defence, they had been, and expected to be still more, involved in expenses, which without assistance they were not able to meet. Elder Woodruff remarked, that circumstances like

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Needs Review

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those in the Cheltenham conference might be the lot of any other, and that it behoved us to sympathise with our brethren, and render them what assistance we could. 174It was then unanimously resolved, that the presidents of conferences lay the case before the churches, and that the Saints be exhorted to render what assistance they can, forwarding the same to Liverpool as early as possible, to be remitted to elder Johnson. 174Elder Ward made some remarks on conformity to the laws of the land, exhorting the brethren never to resort to physical force when oppressed by their enemies, inasmuch as there was abundant protection in the laws, when justly administered. He requested the brethren, that when they had acted according to principles of righteousness, and the laws of the land, in all things, and yet could not get protection or redress from the magistrates, that they would send him the addresses of such persons, and he would adopt measures to teach them their duty. He had been under the necessity of writing to two magistrates, and it behoved all the servants of the Lord to become, as much as possible, acquainted with the laws of the land. 174The Committee of the Joint Stock Company then making their entrance, it was carried unanimously that the articles which had been drawn up by the Committee be read before the meeting, consecutively, and afterwards item by item, to be discussed by the conference. 174After the reading of the articles, 174Elder Ward rose, in the first place, to move a vote of thanks to the brethren of the committee for their very arduous labour, in the production of the articles which had now been read, and which had occupied the committee some sixteen hours. This vote was most heartily and unanimously carried. 174Elder Thomas Wilson, president of the committee, then returned thanks, 174Elder Hedlock rose to express his gratification at the result of the committee, so far, and as he had been the first to suggest the plan, he felt much to rejoice at the prospect of its ultimate success. 174It was then voted that Brother Brown read the articles one by one for the consideration of the conference. 174AFTERNOON SERVICE. 174The service being opened as usual, the following articles were for the time being agreed upon. We shall not here present the remarks made upon each as it passed, but merely quote each article as it was decided upon. 1741. That this Joint Stock Company be called "The Mutual Benefit Association." 1742. That it shall have for its objects the establishing of those branches of manufacture in America, which will be most beneficial, and return to the stockholders the greatest amount of profit, requiring at the same time the least amount of capital in erecting and carrying on its operations. 1743. That this association shall bring over food and provisions from America, that the members may have abundance of those things both cheap and good, at a price considerably beneath that at which such provisions are usually supplied, that thus a saving far exceeding the weekly payment for one share shall be effected. 1744. That its capital shall consist of not less than thirty thousand pounds, divided into sixty thousand shares of ten shillings each: that a deposit of one shilling per share shall be paid within two months from the date hereof, or within one month from the date of the application for shares at any future period; the remainder to be paid in equal parts weekly or monthly, during the following eighteen months. 1745. That each shareholder, shall have one vote, and one only, in all matters connected with the business of the Mutual Benefit Association. 1746. That a committee of fifteen directors shall be chosen to manage the affairs of this association; that every male shareholder, aged twenty-five years, shall be eligible to become a director. That this committee have full power to manage the affairs of this society. That they be appointed for twelve months; that four retire annually by ballot, and other four be chosen in the same manner to fill up the vacancy.

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