3 - Spring 1904

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Miss Bland as angry lover shone, So well performed her part I feared such realistic scenes Might "languish" macA -'s heart [Image - woman in a long dress reclining on a sofa]

But 'twas the "other fellow" quarrel'd As Mac could plainly see And he just whisper'd 'neath his breath "I'm glad it isn't me"

Miss Phyllis gracefully performed Miss Julia's part in white, And Henry has confessed to me 'Twas hard to say 'Good night'

One feature seemed most puzzling To sentimental heart 'Twas that the lovers halted there About three feet apart [Image - two hearts apart pierced by the same arrow]

Last edit about 2 years ago by Carolebar
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They well might taken a lessen now From Lucy's act with Joe Who with a marked experience A little closer go.

Miss Lucy cute and winsome - like In beauty did not lack And Joseph still is tell of The 'Dearness' of the smack.

The maid in cap and apron white And dress of sombre hue Performed with expeditious skill All that she had to do.

The boy of course was boisterous As youngsters always are He danced around the stage awhile Then went like shooting star. [Image - stick figure]

Last edit about 2 years ago by Carolebar
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This ends the story I relate Of play that got encore I tell the shade of Sheridan "The Rivals" hold the floor.

And should the brilliant Western stars Continue thus to shine For Irving or Miss Ellen T. [image of female singer on stage] The people ne'er will pine. [drawn line]

Mac Soliloquizes on the Play. [all underlined] "Well ain't [underlined] she sweet and everybody's happy but me. Here's my friend Henry so happy he can do nothing but talk. I can neither eat, sleep nor drink. I just think I'll go to the telephone. Plays are all right but I knew it would break up our friendship. However I suppose it has to be an annual affair." [drawn line]

Last edit about 2 years ago by Carolebar
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The Play. "The Rivals" has come and gone. No l onger is Miss Rowat's conversation filled with "a nice derangment of epitaphs." Miss Bland ceased to be "as headstrong as an allegory on the banks of the Nile." Mr. Grant is no longer in a frenzy and Mr. Westgate's valor and honor are not mentioned.

Some of the other aspects of the play have not disappeared so quickly in its wake. There seems to be a softer light in the eyes that peer so cautiously into forbidden Number Six. The library is in even more constant demand. But why speak of such things! Are they not an accompaniment to every amateur theatrical venture? Have they not been in the past, will they not be in the future?

The "troop" worked hard during the last week and Friday evening found them tired

Last edit about 2 years ago by Carolebar
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and nervous but happy. Sir Lucius O. Trigger's seventeenth-day-of-Old-Ireland" accent might have been brought over from the sod Sir Anthony Absolute's whiskers were coaxed to stay on, while David, resplendent in green velvet coat and vest, white knee breeches, marvellous Hibernian tie and shoe[s] with buckles [underlined] on them, made much havoc in feminine hearts. It was reported that the sight of his splendor caused him such bliss that he "swiped" every available looking-glass from surrounding rooms, took them to his own, and, after locking the door, gazed at his manifold reflection all afternoon.

On Friday evening the Convocation Hall was packed when the hoop-skirt curtain finally rose. Everybody did extremely wr[?] on Friday and still better on Monday Miss Blend as Lydia Languish was exceeding

Last edit over 1 year ago by jessicafrederick
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