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colored man's viewpoint frankly stated, we know that your
scholarly judgement and love of christian justice would be
potent in gaining for the colored American a full man's
chance, thus enabling him to work our his destiny as an
American citizen.

The colored man of the United States of America is
neither an alien nor an immigrant; but he is a native, al-
lied by blood, habits and customs toa ll the other natives
of this country-- regardless of color or condition--and as such
he asks no special favor but demands the rights and privileges
accorded to every other class of American citizens, native
or naturalized.

It is given to the colored educator and teacher, Mr.
President, to know more intimately the weaknesses as well as
the strength and needs of the American colored people, and if
a committee of educators could have a frank conference with
you, upon the many matters affecting our welfare, we know
that much good would result to the country. The politi-
cians and the theologians have all had their full opportunity
to suggest ways and means to solve this much vexed American
problem, but up to the present time they have all signally
failed.

We therefore ask, Mr. President, that a group of edu-
cators be given an opportunity to call upon you for the purposes
set forth above--looking to a mutual and better understand-
ing, and the relief of the racial tension now existing in the
land, whose common welfare is the general concern of all true
American citizens.

With high regard and esteem, I am, Sir,

Very respectfully,

Lucy E. Moten. M. D.

Principal.

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