Microfilm Reel 285, File 543, "Lynching"

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All the microfilm scans from the file number 543, "Lynching," on reel 285 from the Executive Office files of the Woodrow Wilson Papers, series 4 in the Library of Congress finding aid.

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BOSTON, Mass., June 18, 1818.

THE PRESIDENT.

Mass meeting colored citizens and others observing birth day centenary of Massachusetts Abolitionist War Governor, John A. Andrew, with National Equal Rights League urge you to issue appeal that all citizens cease lynching and all states rescind disfranchisement of colored American citizens to help country win world democracy war.

E. T. Morris, Chairman.

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18 June, 1918

My dear Major Moton:

Thank you for your letter of June fifteenth. 1 have been seeking an opportunity to do what you suggest and if I do not find it soon, I will do it vithout an opportunity.

In haste Sincerely yours,

Major Robert R. Moton, Principal. Tuskegee Institute, Tuskegee, Alabama.

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June 20, 1028.

Dear Joe:-

This letter speaks for itself.

Sincere regards, Herbert Bayard Swope

Honorable Joseph P. Tumulty, The White House Washington, D. C.

Encl.

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June 17,1918.

My dear Swope:-

Received a comunication from Secretary Tumulty this a. m., stating that he would lay matter in which I am interested before the President at his earliest convenience. I want to thank you for putting in a good word for me, and I should appreciate favor if you would assure Mr. Tumulty that I am not of the fire-brand variety but one of the progressive, yet conservative school, who appreciates the fact that we have a race problem and that a better understanding between the races will never be brought about by arraying the white and colored American against one another or by vilification.

With best wishes, I am, Cordially yours, Lester A. Walton

To Mr. Herbert Bayard Swope, Washington, D. C.

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June 24, 1918

President Woodrow Wilson, White House, Washington, D. C.

Dear Mr. President:-

May I thank you for your very kind letter of the 18th; and permit me to make just this one more susgestion regarding the matter on which I wrote you on June 15th. I might say I made this suggestion to Secretary Baker.

The suggestion was that you might think it wise to call together the governors of the states in which mobbings and lynchings have occurred. That will take in three or four Northern states as well as certain Southern states. Or, you might think it wise to have governers from more states, and put the situation to them in your own way, especially as a war measure. Whatever action taken thereafter, local authorities would feel at least their chief executives would have been advised with by yourself. Then, too, I an sare these Governors would appreciate the compliment of being invited by you for such a conference.

Please forgive me for again taking your time. If I seem over-anxious, it is solely for the good of my country by serving as best I may its Chief Executive.

I beg to remain, Yours very respectfully, R. R. Moton

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