Woodrow Wilson Papers Microfilm Reels

Pages That Need Review

Microfilm Reel 231, File 152a, "Segregation"

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3.

to have court protection be free, without barrier or denial.

Give, Mr. President and all our Governors, the same encouragement for volunteering or enlisting to white, to brown, to yellow, to black, Americans all, by vouchsafing the same free chance to enlist, to rise by merit, and on return home, the same right to civil service, and to civil rights without bar or segregation.

With our Great Republic entering a world war for humanity, remove the need for the Colored mother andfather to suffer under the feeling that their son will return to find the color line drawn at factory, eating place, playhouse, and ballet-box; make it not necessary for the Colored soldier in the trenches to suffer with the thought that as he bares his breast to the bullet his sister is segregated in the government service at Washington and his mother in danger of the lynching mob.

Recognizing the world honored ethics of national defense as England promised home-rule to the Irish and Russia abolition of restriction and the ghetto to her Jews, the United States of America is now called upon to grant the abolition of federal segregation and of disfranchisement to her Colored citizens.

As this nation goes forth to right the "natural foe of liberty", let Americans highly resolve that all shall have liberty within her borders. As she fights for democracy as against autocracy let there be a democracy at home 100%, not 80% strong. As our President declares we "fight for the right of those who submit to authority to have a voice in their own government", let as all resolve that when the war is over such shall be the privilege of 100% of our people, not 80%.

Now is the time for all in authority to declare for the aboliti-.

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4.

tion of all racial discriminations and proscriptions and for all to join in our unhyphenated Americanism for victory under the favor of the God of all mankind."

Boston, Mass. April 20, 1917.

Emery T. Morris 30 Parker St. Cambridg Mass. William D. Bringham, 41 Wheatland Ave. Dorchester Mass. Allen W. Whatley 40 Warwick St. Boston Mass. William Monroe Trotter, 34 Cornhill, Boston, Mass. Matthew A. [Neilshew?] D. D. M. D. Allston Hights Boston, Mass Theodore Drury 20 Kendall St. Boston Mass. Mrs. M. Cravath Simpson, 21 Tappan St. Everett R. Mcbante Andrews, 69 Dana St., Cambridge, Mass. Mr. Wesley J. Furlong, Mclrose, Mass. Mrs. Mary E. Gibson 49 Hammond St. Roxbery Mass. Mrs. Mary C. Hall 96 Kendall St. Boston Mass. Mrs J. G. Street 75 Camden St. Roxbury District Boston Mass. Mrs. L. C. Parrish 95 Camden St. Boston Mass. (Rev) Montrose W. Thornton, Boston, Mass. 102 Camden St. Rev Johnson W. Hill #313 Columbus Ave., Boston Mass. Curtis J. Knight [?], #39 [?] St. Boston, Mass. Mrs. Emeline Sport. Edw. P. Dixon.

Committee on Memorial.

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A Message to the Negro Poems by the Century Poet--Acclamations for Declamation Copyright by Black Sampson the Great Untied States Missionary Poet

Debate Between Woodrow Wilson, President of the United States and Wm. Monroe Trotter, spokesman for the Equal Rights League on the agitation of a Democratic administration. Sonnets by the Century Poet. A Message to the Negro for the reorganization of all organizations to amalgamate, to promote the progress of the National Association for the advancement of Colored people, blend to Negro's cause for equal rights under the constitution. Sonnets XV to XIX.

[left column] SONNET XV To the Chief Executive of the United States: Said the spokesman for the Equal Rights Organization: Mr. President, ten million citizens, sir, we represent, Protesting against the segregation in the departments of our national government, Solemn emotion shown in his face When his eyes met the President's. Segregation is discrimination against the Colored race And to loyal citizens a humiliation Unmerited, far reaching and a degredation. This League called on you a year ago, For segregation is a gratutious blow, The Afro-Americans in this nation— Many aided and supported your elevation,

The President replied: SONNET XVI My cabinet has made an investigation. it is friction between black and white that is the cause of the segregation; And my cabinet thinks it is right— That is my view on the situation; And that is the best thought of the administration. The white people admire the progress of your race. Still there is great prejudice in the people's minds. Segregation is a benefit and not a humiliation, And I prefer they progress on independent lines. If it is regarded as an elevation by your organization, And a benefit,. your race will regard it the same. You can cause them to regard it a humiliation, A degradation or a national shame.

The Spokesman: SONNET XVII Replied as quick as he could open his mouth: We are delegates of a league for equal rights That is why we came to the White House Demanding the same rights that are accorded to whites. We do not protest segregation as dependent wards of the nation. But as full-fedged American citizens under the constitution. it is not in accord to acclaim that friction was the cause of segregation it is untenable in view of the facts of the situation. To maintain that friction was the cause of the segregation, In harmony for fifty years they worked under the constitution Side by side in our national government. But soon after the beginning of your inauguration Segregation was drastically introduced into the departments By your appointees to our national government.

The President replied: SONNET XVIII This organization must have another spokesman If it ever has another hearing before me. Looking at the spokesman his face turned red— He was angry the League coud see. Then after a glance carefully around, He said, I dislike your tone with passion in its background. The spokesman was surprised at his ill luck. He looked on the President as if thunderstruck. He said, we cannot control Negroes minds on segregation. They once regarded you the second Abraham Lincoln. Now the puipit will denounce us as traitors to our race. Then the Equal Rights League arose in a body. Traitors, how? said the President, looking in the spokesman's face. Because in nineteen twelve we supported your party!

SONNET XIX -TODAY To the Afro-Americans this message is sent: Legislators have legislated and enforced the laws That were sanctioned by a President That oppresses the Negro and the Negro's cause. Senators have stood all day on our capitol floors Loudly talked and pulled their nose, Enforcing the laws that were filled with flaws To oppress the Negro and the Negro's cause I heard them through our capitol doors While they loudly talked and tore their clothes Enforcing grand pa clause and jim-crow laws To oppress the Negro and the Negro's cause. The Negro has fought in the world's great wars And today I say the Negro must blend to the Negro's cause. [/left column]

[right column] [image: picture of Black Sampson]

1 Was it progress That hewed the forest oaks. Cultivated the soil and sowed the oats: Erected cabins on the hills, And on the rivers great rawmills— Was that progress? What is progress?

2 Was it progress That built schoolhouses in a day And erected churches on her way; Cabins were torn from the hills in haste And mansions erected in their place.— Was that progress? What is progress?

3 Was it progress That surveyed off the blocks. Moulded tools and erected the shops in America's early days— Today she builds great factories— Was that progress? What is progress?

4 Today she moulds great iron steels Her railroads run through thousands of fields The motorcycle appeared with its swift speeding wheel Today there is a great demand for the automobile— Is that progress? What is progress?

5 She has connected the oceans with her hands And flashes the news from land; Her cables run through the sea That tells of wars and wars to be— Is that progrees? What is progress?

6 She is building houses of steel every day And tearing her wooden structures away; The Negro won the battle from Spain And today man sails in the aeroplane— Is that progress? What is progress? [/right column]

B Sampson 612 east archie St Tulsa Okla

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Frederick Douglass Center 3032 Wabash Avenue Telephone Douglas 207

152a

Objects

To promote a just and amicable relation between white and colored people.

To remove the disabilities from which the latter suffer in their civil, political and industrial life.

To encourage equal opportunity, irrespective of race, color or other arbitrary distinctions.

To establish a center of friendly helpfulness and influence, in which to gather needful information, and for mutual cooperation to the ends of right living and a higher citizenship.

You Are Cordially Invited to Join Annual Fee, $1.00

Board of Directors: CELIA PARKER WOOLLEY, PRESIDENT S.LAING WILLLAMS, SECRETARY DR. GEORGE C. HALL. TREASURER E. C. WENTWORTH, CHAIRMAN OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS MISS SAMUELLA CROSBY MRS. HOMER S. TAYLOR F.L. BARNETT

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[left page]

Organization

The Frederick Douglass Center was organized in April, 1904, by Mrs. Celia Parker Woolley, as a practical expression of years of deep interest in the colored people and a desire to ameliorate conditions arising from color prejudice in this country.

The Center purchased its present abode and went into residence March 2, 1905. The house cost $5,500.00 and is paid for. The colored people paid nearly one-third of this sum. The Center is incorporated and governed by a board of seven directors. Every one paying the annual fee of $1.00 or more is entitled to vote.

Activities

Among the activities is a Woman's Club, which meets the 1st and 3rd Tuesdays in the month, at 2:30 p. m., Mrs. J. T. Jenifer, president. This work consists of papers and discussions on topics of general interest, sewing for the School Children's Aid Society and other institutions and co-operating with the charitable organizations of the city.

Regular Sunday Afternoon Meetings are held at 4 p. m., with simply religious services followed by an address on some topic of the day. Mrs. Antoinette Crump Cone, in charge.

The Boys' Club, Mrs. Edna Johnson, leader, meets Tuesday and Friday evenings for games and physical exercise. With a little more money we could enlarge this work. Some books suitable for boys are greatly needed.

Two Domestic Sciences classes are in operation. The cooking class meets Saturday, 10 a m. The Sewing Class follows at 11. The children are taught different stiches, then put to work on simple garments with mending day once a month. The ladies of the Unity Church, Oak Park, equipped the kitchen with a new range and necessary untensils.

For five years the Douglass Center Athelete Association could command no better quarters than were supplied in the basement. Their new home is at 2819 State Street, where the Club has the entire floor in the third story, Samuel Alston is president.

Though forced for lack of room to give up our Employment Association the Center is glad to assist these seeking employment or needing help.

Ways and Means

Perhaps no work of similar aim is maintained at smaller expence. Dr. and Mrs. Woolley headed the subscription for the purchase of the house with a liberal sum and placed their entire stock of household goods at the service of the Center. [/left page]

[right page] Mrs. Woolley gives all of her time to the work. She is ably seconded by Miss Lillian Chapman, private secretary and general assistant. Miss Ellen Snyder, an experienced social worker, is also a resident. No salaries are paid beyond a small wage to the assistant, the leaders of classes, housekeeper and janitor.

Propaganda

The work of the Douglass Center is two-fold. It is a radiating center for the dissemination of more humane and intelligent views on the color question. It stands for equal opportunity, preaching the gospel of justice and good will to the whites and of increased efficiency to the blacks. Appeals for help to adjust cases of unfair discrimination arising from race enmity are constantly presented to us. A few examples will illustrate this side of our work.

Case of a discharged employe at the Bridewell, appeal being first made to the superintendent, then to the mayor, and a satisfactory settlement secured.

A young girl who with aid of influential white friends at last secured admission to the Crippled Children's Home.

Admission of colored applicants to other institutions at first denied, in spite of the law, and through color prejudice of officials.

The F.D C. interested itself actively in urging young colored women to take the examination for probation officers and helped to secure some excellent appointments.

Meetings at one of the white churches in Hyde Park with marked good results in allaying popular excitement arising from the murder of a white woman by a colored burglar.

Helping to avold a color line in a recreation center in the city

Meetings in the interest of colored residents in white neighborhoods.

Securing a Vacation School in Keith School, 90 per cent of colored pupils.

Large gift of books for Keith Library and assistance in purchasing a piano.

Organization of a monthly Parents Meeting in the school building.

Money assistance and legal redress in the case of Mrs. Morgan of Congress Park, whose newly built house was torn down by residents who did not want colored neighbors, with other cases of assistance before the courts.

Securing the abolition of the color line in a summer encampment.

Many cases of legal redress and the reinstatement of a number of colored children suspended from school where the motive of race enmity was plainly revealed.

Investigation of the jail school securing the attendance of colored inmats which had been allowed to lapse.

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Inquiries into the status of colored pupils in the public schools of colored inmates in charitable institutions and into reports of race riots usually greatly exaggerrated and the work of a sensational press.

Securing entrance of a young man into the Young Men's Christian Association for a three years' course in Physical Culture, who acquitted himself with great credit and graduated with honors.

Attempts to secure admission of a colored man from the south in two Veterinary Colleges which failed through fear on the part of the officials of loss of white students.

Efforts to induce the Chicago Union Hospital to abandon an enterprise to raise money from the proceeds of a lecture by Benjamin E. Tillman. The lecture was given but met with little approval from press or public. It was of the speaker's most virulent type and injured himself more than any one else.

Letters to President Roosevelt asking a word of condemnation of Springfield riots; to Senator Cullom concerning his alleged approval of Negro disfranchisement; to Senater Root, thanking him for calling attention to the possible effect of Popular Election of Senators on the Negro vote of the South, and many others of similar import.

Letters of inquiry and protest in many lynching cases.

Investigation of housing conditions in the colored district.

The Center is constantly working to secure the appointment of colored speakers on the programs of all important public conferences and annual conventions. Prof. H. T. Kealing was thus placed on the program of the International Peace Society; Prof. Du Bois on the platform of the Ethical Culture Society and other speakers before the Chicago Woman's Club and similar bodies. Two representatives from the F. D. C. addressed the body of students at the School of Civics and Philanthropy, with promise that a colored speaker should appear regularly every year on its platform. This work is very important. There is no question of social welfare which does not concern the Negro. His voice should be heard on all occasions of public interest. He should be allowed to state his own case in his own way. The head resident of the Center to continually speaking before clubs and other societies, writing newspaper articles and pamphlets, in aid of the cause of race reconciliation. This Propaganda work is done in as quiet a manner as possible, avoiding newspaper notoriety and seeking the aid of personal friends who have infiuence in the particular case in hand. An ounce of discretion is worth a pound of noisy agitation in the correction of public abuses.

Auxiliary Committee

Mrs. Katherine Ware Smith, Mrs. Harold L. Ickes, Miss Laura Beasley, Rev. M. Rowena Morse, Mrs. Geo. C. Hall, Mrs. C. C. Samuels, Miss Ellen Snyder, Mrs. E. L. Lobdell, Mrs. Jessie E. Shears, Mrs. J. H. Harris, Mrs. Fannie Barrier Williams, Miss Sophonisba Breckenridge, Mrs. E. L. Davis, Miss Jean Masson, Mrs. Wm. B. Macon, Mrs. Melida Pappe, Mrs. Annie W. Fitts, Mrs. J. S. Tandy, Dr. Mary F. Waring.

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MR. WILSON AND THE NEGROES. Chicago, Nov. 4—(Editor of The Tribune.) —I wish to express the hearty thanks and gratification of members and friends of the Frederick Douglass center and of all fair minded people for your timely editorial of recent date upholding Mr. Oswald Villard's course in his protests against the new policy of negro segregation in the departments of Washington.

Mr. Wilson's administrative course has been so entirely satisfactory in every other respect to all progressive minds, whether wearing the party label or not that disappointment over this particular defection from his well known principies of democratic faith and honor is all the sharper. But many of us cling to the hope that when he is made fully aware of what is going on under Bourbon infiuence to disqualify a large class of patriotic citizens he will correct his mistake. CELIA PARKER WOOLLEY.

FREDERICK DOUGLASS CENTER 3032 WABASH AVE.

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BOSTON NEGRO IS INSULTING TO PRESIDENT; ORDERED OUT

Mr. Wilson Resents Conduct of Chairman of Massachusetts Delegation "Demanding Rights," Not Charity.

COMMITTEE TOLD TO GET A NEW HEAD

Chief Executive Said He Had Not Been Spoken to in Such a Way Since Taking Office.

WASHINGTON, Dec. 12.—President Wilson, while receiving a delegation of negroes to-day who came to the white house to protest against segregating the races in government departments, objected to the tone adopted by their spokesman, W. M. Trotter, of Boston, and told the committee that if it called on him again it would have to get a new chairman. The president added he had not been addressed in such a manner since he entered the white house.

The delegation charged that Secretary McAdoo and Comptroller Williams, in the treasury, and Postmaster General Burleson had enforced segregation rules in their offices. President Wilson replied that he had investigated the question and had been assured that there had been a discrimination in the comforts and surroundings given to the negros. He added he had been informed by officials that the segregation had been started to avoid friction between the races and not with the object of injuring the negroes. The president said that he was deeply interested in the negro race and greatly admired its progress. He declared the thing to be sought by negro people was complete independence of white people and that he felt the white race was willing to do everything possible to assist them.

Trotter and other members at once took issue with the president, declaring the negro people did not seek charity or assistance, but that they took the position that negroes had equal rights with the whites and that those rights should be respected. They denied there had been any friction between the two races

ITY-EIGHTH VEAR NEW ORLEANS, 14

4h 000

ill, Chief Refno red, Man Wounds

phes

Clyder al Sta

int Stri

2S. C. Nov. 12£8. Wv. is manager of the Lafk

Times-Union, was

Ingram, of the Ayde

and C. L. Wright,

K, were wounded by

d to be H. 6. Perkins)

hile aboard the vessel 2. When the Mohawk

& hours late this after-

was taken in charge D

held, pending action by Mrs. Hinman and Cap-

ere talking in the com en Perkins approached

ntly under the influence

Mr. Wilson Resents Conduel of Chairman of Massa-

according to witnesses,

I to have fired the first

chusetts Delegation De-

rick Captain Ingram in

manding Rights, Not

shot next, a third but ight in his side. Per-

Charity.

have attempted to shoot is restrained.

11 early to day brought

ward from the torpedo

COMMITTEE TOLD

TO GET NEW HEAD

Flusser to the assist

unded, while the Mo the North Carolina

ngram was reported to ondition. Perkins was

police arrested him

Chief Executive Said He Had Not Been Spoken to

in Such a Way Since Tak

urglar Varn

ing Office.

ped by Police

WASHINGTON. Dec. 12— President Wilson, while receiving a delegation

endent James W. Reyfurther investigation it of Miss Lawrence

was held up by the

dropped Thursday

of report from As-

tectives Dan Mouney

touney there was a aning carpets in the

he yard where Miss

1413 Marais street,

raulted. Furthermore, reclared that the 74.

arrested several

1 by several of

1 med toe moske to

of negroes to day who came to the

white house to protest against segre gating the races in government depart

ments, objected to the tone adopted

by their spokesman, W. M. Trotter, of

Boston, and told the committee that

if it called on him again it would

have to get a new chairman. The

Dresident added he had not been ad

dressed in such a manner since he en tered the white house.

The delegation charged that Secre

tary MeAdoo and Comptroller W

lams, in the treasury, and Postmaster General Burleson had enforced segre-

gation rules in their offices. Prest

dent Wilson replied that he had in

vestigated the question and had been

ro

Mtaed He RAU been mrortnce or

ansed, and on seeing cials that the segregation had been hom per father forto at the Procery

started to avoid friction between the

races and not with the object of in-

nter the place, Sh juring the negroes.The president to the home of a said that he was deeply interested in nd Leaumont, 1423 the negro race and greatly admired its & her own home in

e there refused

1

cook dispatched by

back yard she said

Drogress. He declared the thing to be

sought by the negro people was com

plete independence of white people and

Decla Eve

That

that he felt the white race was will- no def ing to do everything possible to assist an in

y a man wearing a them. Trotter and other members at once man's hat, who had took issue with the president, declar

bers of

threw the powder in charity or assistance. but that they took the position that the negroes had

droppe

and, containing pow 2 feet long in the

scratching her face

1, asked for the bil

r. She said she sur.

fellow ran off.

ing the negro people did not seek

as con

heS1

hat

ican

equal rights with the whites and that

neys

They denied there had been any frie

noon

those rights shouldbe

repected.

tion between the two races before

before

the

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Chief Executive Said He Had Not Been Spoken to in Such a Way Since Taking Office.

WASHINGTON, Dec. 12.—President Wilson, while receiving a delegation of negroes to-day who came to the white house to protest against segregating the races in government departments, objected to the tone adopted by their spokesman, W. M. Trotter, of Boston, and told the committee that if it called on him again it would have to get a new chairman. The president added he had not been addressed in such a manner since he entered the white house.

The delegation charged that Secretary McAdoo and Comptroller Williams, in the treasury, and Postmaster General Burleson had enforced segregation rules in their offices. President Wilson replied that he had investigated the question and had been assured that there had been a discrimination in the comforts and surroundings given to the negros. He added he had been informed by officials that the segregation had been started to avoid friction between the races and not with the object of injuring the negroes. The president said that he was deeply interested in the negro race and greatly admired its progress. He declared the thing to be sought by negro people was complete independence of white people and that he felt the white race was willing to do everything possible to assist them.

Trotter and other members at once took issue with the president, declaring the negro people did not seek charity or assistance, but that they took the position that negroes had equal rights with the whites and that those rights should be respected. They denied there had been any friction between the two races before segregation was begun.

President Wilson listened to what they had to say, and then told the delegation that Trotter was losing control of his temper and that he (the president) would not discuss the matter further with him.

After leaving the president's private office Trotter, Maurice V. Spencer and others of the delegation declared their talk had been "thoroughly disappointing."

They delared they would hold a mass meeting in Washington Sunday to discuss the question.

Mr. Wilson is understood to have told the committee the question was not a political one and that he would not take it up on political grounds.

Talk That Offended.

Trotter came to the white house with a prepared speech to which the president listened. It was after delivering this address, however, that Trotter made remarks in a tone which displeased President Wilson.

In the address Trotter reminded the president that the delegation called on Mr. Wilson a year ago, at which time he had promised to investigate the question.

"We stated," said Trotter, "that there could be no freedom, no respect from others, and no equality of citizenship under segregation for races. For such placement of employes means a charge by the government of physical indecency or infection, or being a lower order of beings, or a subjection to the prejudice of other citizens, which constitutes inferiority of status.

"We stated that such segregation was a public humiliation and degredation entirely unmerited and far-reaching in its injurous effects. Now after the lapse of a year we have come back, having found that all the reforms of segregationh in governmen employes of African extraction are still being practiced in the treasury and postoffice department buildings, and to a certain extent have spread into other government buildings."

The delegation presented a resolution of the Massachusetts legislature and letters from several Massachusetts Democratic members of congress protesting against race segregation in federal government departments.

IMPRISONED FOUR DAYS IN MINE, 2 MEN RESCUED ALIVE

POTTSVILLE, Pa., Nov. 12—John Evans and William Schreiner, coal miners, who had been imprisoned for four days behind a huge fall of coal in a mine in which tye were working, were rescued alive this morning.

85094

ias executive Said He

rrested him

Had Not Been Spoken to

in Such a Way Since Tak

urglar Varn

ing Office.

ped by Police

WASHINGTON, Dec. 12.—President Wilson, while receiving a delegation of negroes to day who came to the

endent James W. Rey-

white house to protest against segre

further investigation

gating the races in government depart

nt of Miss Lawrence ments, objected to the tone adopted was held up by the by their spokesman, W. M. Trotter, of dropped Thursday Boston, and told the committee that of report from As

1 ii called on him again it would ave to get a new chairman. The

lectives Dan Mouney

president added he had not been ad

touney there was

dressed in such a manner since he en

aning carpets in the

tered the white house

1413 Marais street,

tary MeAdoo and Comptroller Wit

The delegation charged that Secre-

he vard where Miss

iams, in the treasury, and Postmaster

saulted. Furthermore,

sation rules in their offices. Prest

dent Wilson replied that he had

1 by severalof

vestigated th

o

hom per father for

& her own home in

cook dispatchedD

nd

tarted to avold friction between the

races and not with the object of in

to at the Procery nter the place, Sh

e there refused to

1

a

MIACA Re RII bEen rorince v cials that the segregation had been

+ toe masker

aiged, and on secing

to the home of a ad Leaumont, 142

0

General Burleson had enforced segre

leclared that the 7 arrested several

Decla Eve

uring the negroes. The president

said that he was deeply interested in

the negro race and greatly admired its Drogress. He declared the thing to be sought by the negro people was com plete independence of white people and

That

that he felt the white race was will-

no def

them.

hers of

rack yard she said ing to do everything possible to assist an in y a man wearing a

Trotter and other members at once as con

man's hat, who had

the

took issue with the president, declar

nd. containing pow-

ing the negro people did not seel

2 feet long in the

threw the powder ir

S1

that

charity or assistance. but that they

droppe

took the position that the negroes had

ican

scratching her face equal rights with the whites and that nevs 1. asked for the bill be repected. before those rights should r. She said she sur They denied there had been any frienoon

fellow ran off.

tion between the two races before

yeads

Association

the c

T segregation was begun. President Wilson listened to what one they had to say. and then told the ion. delexation that Trotter was losing like

Nov. 12.—Dr. Osear

court.

control of his temper and that he

the president) would not discuss the

and

matter further with him.

blank He

After leaving the president's private

190 0

of the Louisiana

office Trotter, Maurice V. Spencer and

others of the delegation declared their

HHilnl

inal meeting of the

talk had been Thoroughly disappointing.

a for

th. was to day elect. e Southern Medica) ention

here

The

did n

They declared they would hold

the

njur

Orieans health of- mass meetins in Washington Sunday

us.

presidents to

Dr.

Door, of Arkansas. of this cy. The

ined to hold its sesDallas, Texas =lection came as

clation of the South ession for the work

towards establishing

ulations, not only in

hrough the entir

ign in behalf of sant p in the recent fight

against the Dubonic ioned as elements es

He

o discuss the question

had

Mr. Wilson is understood to have

state

told the committee the question was

Ar done

not a political one and that he would not take ii up on political grounds.

fendar

Talk That Offended.

Mr

Trotter came to the white house with

fornis

a prepared speech to which the prest

dent listened. II was after delivering

form

pleased President Wilson.

to cireum

pany ha

in the address Trotter reminded the

and ince

president that the delegation called on

formed.

Mr. Wilson a year ago, at which time

in one

him to the highest he had promised to Investigate the question.

vals Will

could be no freedom, no respect from

ked in Court Reed. of Richmond M. B. Bettison, of

appeared before

sday and fited a pe-

meric

which

this address, however, that Trotter made remarks in a tone which dis

octation.

proces

this acti sage of the

We stated, said Trotter, that there

the state

others, and no equality of citizenshif under segregation for racce. For such

Article 190 sider 11 fun

by the sovernment of physical inde

whatever of

placement of employes means a charge article sive

cency or infection, or being a lower present actic order of beings, or a subjection to the the sugar co.

projudice of other citizens, which con ceedings. These

stitutes infertority of status.

swept the su

We stated that such segregation was

esque of a a public humiliation and degradation the court set aside entirely unmerited and far-reaching in quently cone late Mary Percival, its injurious effects. Now after the people, wher

Free Church of the

apse of a year we have come back the constieut

copal. heir to the harles and Gravies

having found that all the reforms of

ied by the Western ompany.

African extraction are still being prac-

he Louisiana laws

ht to a person to

the natural heirs

tances not found

roperty be siver bly will be con B.

egregation of government employes of

liced in the treasury and postoffice de partment buildings, and toa certain

extent have spread into other govern

ment buildings.

The delegation presented a resolation

of the Massachusetts legislature and

lettersfrom several Massachusett Democratie members of congress pro

lesting against race segregation in fed

ndicts

ote Frauds Vov. 12—More been indicted by ke county for bay

es at the Indictal

ago. according to e to-day. The intried at the Jan-

rcuit court at Pike

85094

eral soverement departments.

IMPRISONED FOUR DAYS IN

MINE, 2 MEN RESCUED ALIVE POTTSVILLE. Pa, Nov. 12—John Evans and William Schreiner, coal miners, who had been imprisoned for four days behind a hage fall of coal in a mine in which they

were working, were resened alive this morning.

circumseribis

for the liber we hold that

the legislatur

Mr. Caffer the governor legislature to and instructi

al conventio

entirely with He named

which our op

they so fart must be tak

upon the legi than what

Which restri transmitted

vention. The or's powers

claims that District A

morning se

to the sugar claimed that

I sent the for

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207
Needs Review

207

[153]

2:30 Fri Mar 14 East Room

Ackgd 3/12/13

[stamp: THE WHITE HOUSE MAR 12 1913 RECEIVED]

Hon. SECRETARY TO THE PRESIDENT, White House, Washington, D.C.,

Dear Sir:-

Will you kindly inform me at your earliest opportunity the day and hour that a Committee of the NATIONAL NEGRO DEMOCRATIC LEAGUE can be received by President Wilson in a short conference, and also desiring to pay our respects as Negro Citizens of the Democratic Party, prompts this request.

Most respectfully yours, L. S. Moore Prest. N. N. Dem. League 802 "F" St., N.W.

85096

Last edit over 2 years ago by Harpwench
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