Woodrow Wilson Papers Microfilm Reels

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Microfilm Reel 231, File 152a, "Segregation"

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BOSTON NEGRO IS INSULTING TO PRESIDENT; ORDERED OUT

Mr. Wilson Resents Conduct of Chairman of Massachusetts Delegation "Demanding Rights," Not Charity.

COMMITTEE TOLD TO GET A NEW HEAD

Chief Executive Said He Had Not Been Spoken to in Such a Way Since Taking Office.

WASHINGTON, Dec. 12.—President Wilson, while receiving a delegation of negroes to-day who came to the white house to protest against segregating the races in government departments, objected to the tone adopted by their spokesman, W. M. Trotter, of Boston, and told the committee that if it called on him again it would have to get a new chairman. The president added he had not been addressed in such a manner since he entered the white house.

The delegation charged that Secretary McAdoo and Comptroller Williams, in the treasury, and Postmaster General Burleson had enforced segregation rules in their offices. President Wilson replied that he had investigated the question and had been assured that there had been a discrimination in the comforts and surroundings given to the negros. He added he had been informed by officials that the segregation had been started to avoid friction between the races and not with the object of injuring the negroes. The president said that he was deeply interested in the negro race and greatly admired its progress. He declared the thing to be sought by negro people was complete independence of white people and that he felt the white race was willing to do everything possible to assist them.

Trotter and other members at once took issue with the president, declaring the negro people did not seek charity or assistance, but that they took the position that negroes had equal rights with the whites and that those rights should be respected. They denied there had been any friction between the two races

ITY-EIGHTH VEAR NEW ORLEANS, 14

4h 000

ill, Chief Refno red, Man Wounds

phes

Clyder al Sta

int Stri

2S. C. Nov. 12£8. Wv. is manager of the Lafk

Times-Union, was

Ingram, of the Ayde

and C. L. Wright,

K, were wounded by

d to be H. 6. Perkins)

hile aboard the vessel 2. When the Mohawk

& hours late this after-

was taken in charge D

held, pending action by Mrs. Hinman and Cap-

ere talking in the com en Perkins approached

ntly under the influence

Mr. Wilson Resents Conduel of Chairman of Massa-

according to witnesses,

I to have fired the first

chusetts Delegation De-

rick Captain Ingram in

manding Rights, Not

shot next, a third but ight in his side. Per-

Charity.

have attempted to shoot is restrained.

11 early to day brought

ward from the torpedo

COMMITTEE TOLD

TO GET NEW HEAD

Flusser to the assist

unded, while the Mo the North Carolina

ngram was reported to ondition. Perkins was

police arrested him

Chief Executive Said He Had Not Been Spoken to

in Such a Way Since Tak

urglar Varn

ing Office.

ped by Police

WASHINGTON. Dec. 12— President Wilson, while receiving a delegation

endent James W. Reyfurther investigation it of Miss Lawrence

was held up by the

dropped Thursday

of report from As-

tectives Dan Mouney

touney there was a aning carpets in the

he yard where Miss

1413 Marais street,

raulted. Furthermore, reclared that the 74.

arrested several

1 by several of

1 med toe moske to

of negroes to day who came to the

white house to protest against segre gating the races in government depart

ments, objected to the tone adopted

by their spokesman, W. M. Trotter, of

Boston, and told the committee that

if it called on him again it would

have to get a new chairman. The

Dresident added he had not been ad

dressed in such a manner since he en tered the white house.

The delegation charged that Secre

tary MeAdoo and Comptroller W

lams, in the treasury, and Postmaster General Burleson had enforced segre-

gation rules in their offices. Prest

dent Wilson replied that he had in

vestigated the question and had been

ro

Mtaed He RAU been mrortnce or

ansed, and on seeing cials that the segregation had been hom per father forto at the Procery

started to avoid friction between the

races and not with the object of in-

nter the place, Sh juring the negroes.The president to the home of a said that he was deeply interested in nd Leaumont, 1423 the negro race and greatly admired its & her own home in

e there refused

1

cook dispatched by

back yard she said

Drogress. He declared the thing to be

sought by the negro people was com

plete independence of white people and

Decla Eve

That

that he felt the white race was will- no def ing to do everything possible to assist an in

y a man wearing a them. Trotter and other members at once man's hat, who had took issue with the president, declar

bers of

threw the powder in charity or assistance. but that they took the position that the negroes had

droppe

and, containing pow 2 feet long in the

scratching her face

1, asked for the bil

r. She said she sur.

fellow ran off.

ing the negro people did not seek

as con

heS1

hat

ican

equal rights with the whites and that

neys

They denied there had been any frie

noon

those rights shouldbe

repected.

tion between the two races before

before

the

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Needs Review

205

Chief Executive Said He Had Not Been Spoken to in Such a Way Since Taking Office.

WASHINGTON, Dec. 12.—President Wilson, while receiving a delegation of negroes to-day who came to the white house to protest against segregating the races in government departments, objected to the tone adopted by their spokesman, W. M. Trotter, of Boston, and told the committee that if it called on him again it would have to get a new chairman. The president added he had not been addressed in such a manner since he entered the white house.

The delegation charged that Secretary McAdoo and Comptroller Williams, in the treasury, and Postmaster General Burleson had enforced segregation rules in their offices. President Wilson replied that he had investigated the question and had been assured that there had been a discrimination in the comforts and surroundings given to the negros. He added he had been informed by officials that the segregation had been started to avoid friction between the races and not with the object of injuring the negroes. The president said that he was deeply interested in the negro race and greatly admired its progress. He declared the thing to be sought by negro people was complete independence of white people and that he felt the white race was willing to do everything possible to assist them.

Trotter and other members at once took issue with the president, declaring the negro people did not seek charity or assistance, but that they took the position that negroes had equal rights with the whites and that those rights should be respected. They denied there had been any friction between the two races before segregation was begun.

President Wilson listened to what they had to say, and then told the delegation that Trotter was losing control of his temper and that he (the president) would not discuss the matter further with him.

After leaving the president's private office Trotter, Maurice V. Spencer and others of the delegation declared their talk had been "thoroughly disappointing."

They delared they would hold a mass meeting in Washington Sunday to discuss the question.

Mr. Wilson is understood to have told the committee the question was not a political one and that he would not take it up on political grounds.

Talk That Offended.

Trotter came to the white house with a prepared speech to which the president listened. It was after delivering this address, however, that Trotter made remarks in a tone which displeased President Wilson.

In the address Trotter reminded the president that the delegation called on Mr. Wilson a year ago, at which time he had promised to investigate the question.

"We stated," said Trotter, "that there could be no freedom, no respect from others, and no equality of citizenship under segregation for races. For such placement of employes means a charge by the government of physical indecency or infection, or being a lower order of beings, or a subjection to the prejudice of other citizens, which constitutes inferiority of status.

"We stated that such segregation was a public humiliation and degredation entirely unmerited and far-reaching in its injurous effects. Now after the lapse of a year we have come back, having found that all the reforms of segregationh in governmen employes of African extraction are still being practiced in the treasury and postoffice department buildings, and to a certain extent have spread into other government buildings."

The delegation presented a resolution of the Massachusetts legislature and letters from several Massachusetts Democratic members of congress protesting against race segregation in federal government departments.

IMPRISONED FOUR DAYS IN MINE, 2 MEN RESCUED ALIVE

POTTSVILLE, Pa., Nov. 12—John Evans and William Schreiner, coal miners, who had been imprisoned for four days behind a huge fall of coal in a mine in which tye were working, were rescued alive this morning.

85094

ias executive Said He

rrested him

Had Not Been Spoken to

in Such a Way Since Tak

urglar Varn

ing Office.

ped by Police

WASHINGTON, Dec. 12.—President Wilson, while receiving a delegation of negroes to day who came to the

endent James W. Rey-

white house to protest against segre

further investigation

gating the races in government depart

nt of Miss Lawrence ments, objected to the tone adopted was held up by the by their spokesman, W. M. Trotter, of dropped Thursday Boston, and told the committee that of report from As

1 ii called on him again it would ave to get a new chairman. The

lectives Dan Mouney

president added he had not been ad

touney there was

dressed in such a manner since he en

aning carpets in the

tered the white house

1413 Marais street,

tary MeAdoo and Comptroller Wit

The delegation charged that Secre-

he vard where Miss

iams, in the treasury, and Postmaster

saulted. Furthermore,

sation rules in their offices. Prest

dent Wilson replied that he had

1 by severalof

vestigated th

o

hom per father for

& her own home in

cook dispatchedD

nd

tarted to avold friction between the

races and not with the object of in

to at the Procery nter the place, Sh

e there refused to

1

a

MIACA Re RII bEen rorince v cials that the segregation had been

+ toe masker

aiged, and on secing

to the home of a ad Leaumont, 142

0

General Burleson had enforced segre

leclared that the 7 arrested several

Decla Eve

uring the negroes. The president

said that he was deeply interested in

the negro race and greatly admired its Drogress. He declared the thing to be sought by the negro people was com plete independence of white people and

That

that he felt the white race was will-

no def

them.

hers of

rack yard she said ing to do everything possible to assist an in y a man wearing a

Trotter and other members at once as con

man's hat, who had

the

took issue with the president, declar

nd. containing pow-

ing the negro people did not seel

2 feet long in the

threw the powder ir

S1

that

charity or assistance. but that they

droppe

took the position that the negroes had

ican

scratching her face equal rights with the whites and that nevs 1. asked for the bill be repected. before those rights should r. She said she sur They denied there had been any frienoon

fellow ran off.

tion between the two races before

yeads

Association

the c

T segregation was begun. President Wilson listened to what one they had to say. and then told the ion. delexation that Trotter was losing like

Nov. 12.—Dr. Osear

court.

control of his temper and that he

the president) would not discuss the

and

matter further with him.

blank He

After leaving the president's private

190 0

of the Louisiana

office Trotter, Maurice V. Spencer and

others of the delegation declared their

HHilnl

inal meeting of the

talk had been Thoroughly disappointing.

a for

th. was to day elect. e Southern Medica) ention

here

The

did n

They declared they would hold

the

njur

Orieans health of- mass meetins in Washington Sunday

us.

presidents to

Dr.

Door, of Arkansas. of this cy. The

ined to hold its sesDallas, Texas =lection came as

clation of the South ession for the work

towards establishing

ulations, not only in

hrough the entir

ign in behalf of sant p in the recent fight

against the Dubonic ioned as elements es

He

o discuss the question

had

Mr. Wilson is understood to have

state

told the committee the question was

Ar done

not a political one and that he would not take ii up on political grounds.

fendar

Talk That Offended.

Mr

Trotter came to the white house with

fornis

a prepared speech to which the prest

dent listened. II was after delivering

form

pleased President Wilson.

to cireum

pany ha

in the address Trotter reminded the

and ince

president that the delegation called on

formed.

Mr. Wilson a year ago, at which time

in one

him to the highest he had promised to Investigate the question.

vals Will

could be no freedom, no respect from

ked in Court Reed. of Richmond M. B. Bettison, of

appeared before

sday and fited a pe-

meric

which

this address, however, that Trotter made remarks in a tone which dis

octation.

proces

this acti sage of the

We stated, said Trotter, that there

the state

others, and no equality of citizenshif under segregation for racce. For such

Article 190 sider 11 fun

by the sovernment of physical inde

whatever of

placement of employes means a charge article sive

cency or infection, or being a lower present actic order of beings, or a subjection to the the sugar co.

projudice of other citizens, which con ceedings. These

stitutes infertority of status.

swept the su

We stated that such segregation was

esque of a a public humiliation and degradation the court set aside entirely unmerited and far-reaching in quently cone late Mary Percival, its injurious effects. Now after the people, wher

Free Church of the

apse of a year we have come back the constieut

copal. heir to the harles and Gravies

having found that all the reforms of

ied by the Western ompany.

African extraction are still being prac-

he Louisiana laws

ht to a person to

the natural heirs

tances not found

roperty be siver bly will be con B.

egregation of government employes of

liced in the treasury and postoffice de partment buildings, and toa certain

extent have spread into other govern

ment buildings.

The delegation presented a resolation

of the Massachusetts legislature and

lettersfrom several Massachusett Democratie members of congress pro

lesting against race segregation in fed

ndicts

ote Frauds Vov. 12—More been indicted by ke county for bay

es at the Indictal

ago. according to e to-day. The intried at the Jan-

rcuit court at Pike

85094

eral soverement departments.

IMPRISONED FOUR DAYS IN

MINE, 2 MEN RESCUED ALIVE POTTSVILLE. Pa, Nov. 12—John Evans and William Schreiner, coal miners, who had been imprisoned for four days behind a hage fall of coal in a mine in which they

were working, were resened alive this morning.

circumseribis

for the liber we hold that

the legislatur

Mr. Caffer the governor legislature to and instructi

al conventio

entirely with He named

which our op

they so fart must be tak

upon the legi than what

Which restri transmitted

vention. The or's powers

claims that District A

morning se

to the sugar claimed that

I sent the for

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Needs Review

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[153]

2:30 Fri Mar 14 East Room

Ackgd 3/12/13

[stamp: THE WHITE HOUSE MAR 12 1913 RECEIVED]

Hon. SECRETARY TO THE PRESIDENT, White House, Washington, D.C.,

Dear Sir:-

Will you kindly inform me at your earliest opportunity the day and hour that a Committee of the NATIONAL NEGRO DEMOCRATIC LEAGUE can be received by President Wilson in a short conference, and also desiring to pay our respects as Negro Citizens of the Democratic Party, prompts this request.

Most respectfully yours, L. S. Moore Prest. N. N. Dem. League 802 "F" St., N.W.

85096

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[153]

March 13, 1913.

[stamp: ACK'D MAR 22 1913 C.L.S.]

Mr. President:

We congratulate you for your splendid Inaugural Address. It is teeming with expressions of justice and equal rights for each and every citizen. It expresses the ideals of equal rights as conceived by the founders of our Government. Being representatives of that class of American citizens who are habitually controlled by the forms and practices of the slavery of the past, we rejoice in your grand expressions of equal rights for every citizen. We assure you, Mr. President, of our activity and help in aiding you to make those noble sentiments of justice delivered by you on March 4th, 1913, a practical realization among the citizens of our great and grand country. No citizens are more patriotic and no citizens are more true and loyal to the stars and stripes than those we represent and we will always be willing and ready with whatever power we possess to uphold the equal rights of the citizens so well announced by you.

We thank you, Mr. President, for this interview and we hope that your administration will go down in history as one of the best in the United States of America.

Respectfully, Joseph H. Stewart Secretary

85097

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Needs Review

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RACE SEGREGATION AT WASHINGTON

The rebuke administered by President Wilson yesterday to the spokesman of a negro delegation was so thoroughly just and deserved that it will be approved by the vast majority of Americans irrespective of political affiliations or sectional lines. The delegation asked and was granted the courtesy of a hearing. Mr. Wilson listened patiently to the recitation of a prepared speech by the offending spokesman. It is evident that his own conclusions, stated in answer to the harangue of the agitator, were neither patiently nor courteously received. When the man Trotter became offensive the President very promptly and properly cut the interview short.

While agitators of the Trotter stripe and certain of their political inciters will doubtless strive to make capital of it, the episode will react to the sole injury of the Trotter cause. Race instinct has quickened wonderfully throughout the white North of recent years. Insistent and offensive demands for racial social equality by self-styled negro leaders, and the attempts at offensive assertion of their imagined "rights," are largely responsible for the race clashes recorded in more than a few Northern States. In a few cities, notably in Boston and Washington, these so-called leaders have been "humored" for sentimental or political reasons. In Boston, only the other day, a book of classical folksongs, compiled for use in the public schools, provoked a violent protest from Boston blacks because one of the old songs contained the word "nigger," though the song is doubtless loved and chanted by thousands of negroes. And the school authorities obligingly ordered the song "eliminated." In Washington, where Republican administrations long catered to the "negro vote," the presence of negro undesirables in and out of the Federal service is shown by the police records. Race friction began there long before Mr. Wilson entered the White House. Epidemics of negro crimes more than once have produced mass meetings of protest among the white citizens. Conditions caused by mixture of the races in the Federal departments were complained of, and were giving trouble years before this administration. In spite of the negro delegation's denials, the existence of race friction before the segregation order of which they complain was a fact established past dispute. 84930

The segregation effected during this administration can be justified on any one of a number of grounds. It makes for efficiency in the public service, and for better

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Albuqureque N. M. Feb 23, 1914.

152a

[stamp: THE WHITE HOUSE FEB 26 1914 RECEIVED]

Hon. Woodrow Wilson: President of These U. S. White House, Wash. D. C.

Honorable Sir:

We, the grievance committee of the New Mexico Protective Association, beg leave to submit the following protest, against the segregation of the federal employes in Wash. D. C, under your administration.

We beg leave to call your attention, to one of your pre-election pledges, namely: "Should I become president of the U. S., they (The colored people) may count on me, for absolute fair dealing; & for everything, by which I could assist, in advancing the interest of their race, in the U. S."

We, deeming segregation inimical to the advancement of any race, therefore, pray you, to use the influence of your high office, to have the heads of the various government departments, rescind their orders, or change their policies of segregating the federal employes, at the very seat of the government.

Committee Dr. J. D. Dennis, Prof. J. A. Scott Theo. M. Brinson.

Very respectfully Yours,

84885 .

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11/13 191____.

Mr. Woodrow Wilson, President of U.S. Washington, D.C

[stamp: THE WHITE HOUSE NOV 16 1914 RECEIVED]

152a

My dear Sir,-

As a warm and stauch friend and supporter of yours, I am assuming the liberty of enclosing a "self-explantory" clipping.

If you will only send the illustrated "Trotter," down here, I'll promise you he will receive a very warm reception.

Believe me,

Yours most obediently, Edw. J. Mair.

N.B. Enclosed find folder of our little city.

84931

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[stamp: THE WHITE HOUSE DEC 10 1914 RECEIVED]

152a

Washington, Dec. 9, 1914

Hon. Joseph P. Tumulty,

Dear Sir:

I enclose herewith a clipping from the Indianapolis World on the Trotter incident. I think it is one of the best and [?] utterances on that matter that I have seen, I want you to read it.

Very tuly yours, Robert H. Terrell

P. S. The Editor of the World is A.E. Manning whom you know.

R. H. T.

85058

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Needs Review

48

4

bodies one kept away from White bodies the better for both and the greater progress will the white race will make friee from the negroe beggar who lives on charity more than on industry. Nothing has degenerated the white southern race as Negroe cooks — and the unseen filth that goes through their mouth hands breasts and abdominal and seat pants of ther bodies

Last edit 4 months ago by MaryV

Microfilm Reel 288, File 612, "Haiti"

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Needs Review

26

October 29, 1914.

American Legation.

Port au Prince, Haiti.

Transport HANCOCK with eight hundred marines has been ordered to proceed to Port au Prince immediately with orders to land men at your request. HANCOCK is due at Port au Prince evening of October thirty.

Battleship KANSAS from Mexican waters has also been ordered to Port an Prince.

Department is contemplating convention along the lines of your instruction of July two. At the same time it is desired to reach agreement for a fair election to be held within a specified time similar to Department's action in Dominican Republic.

Department feels it advisable to negotiate with Zamor Brothers and if President Zamor has already left the country wishes every protection afforded to Charles Zamor now reported refugee in Consulate.

Upon arrival of the HANCOCK you will at your discretion request conmanding officer to take charge of Port au Prince and will restore Charles Zamor to his Cabinet functions. Further instructions will be sent shortly. Report by Cable.

B/N

Acting Secretary.

155603

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