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1251 South 18th Street PHILADELPHIA PA. March 17, 1913.

Joseph P. Tumulty, Esq., Secretary to the President, Washington, D.C.

[stamp: THE WHITE HOUSE MAR 18 1913 RECEIVED]

My dear Mr. Tumulty:-

I am sending, in your special care, another letter to President Wilson. I wish you would kindly read this letter, and the enclosed newspaper clipping, with care yourself before bringing it to the attention of the President, because it takes up the question of Negro political patronage, with which I learn you are already much beset, and which I very much fear is being handled from the outside in a way that is most likely to embarrass both the Negro race and the Democratic Administration.

If you will give this matter your earnest attention I trust that I will not again soon find myself called upon to intrude upon your generosity of nature.

Your humble servant,

J. S. Stemon

83417

Last edit about 3 years ago by nalhamad
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766

12 PUBLIC LEDGER-PHILADELPHIA. MONDAY MORNING. APRIL 2

[column 1] ESTABLISHED 1836. PUBLIC [image: logo] LEDGER GEORGE W. CHILDS Editor and Proprietor from 1864 to 1894. _____________________ Published every morning at PUBLIC LEDGER Bldg. By PUBLIC LEDGER COMPANY: CYRUS H. K. CURTIS, President John Gribbel, Vice President; George W Ochs, Secretary and Treasurer; Chas H. Ludington, Phillip S. Collins, Directors _______________________ George W. Ochs, Editor and Publisher; Alan Cunningham, Associate Editor: G. Warfield Hobbs, Managing Editor; Milton B. Ochs, Business Manager _______________________ OFFICES: Main Office —Independence Square. CENTRL—Postal Telegraph, 1326 Chestnut St. UPTOWN—Fenner's, Broad & Columbia Ave. HARRISBURG BUREAU—The Patriot Building. WASHINGTON BUREAU—The Post Building. NEW YORK BUREAU—The Times Building. BERLIN—60 Friedrichstrasse. LONDON—2 Pall Mall East, S.W. PARIS—32 Rue Louis le Grand. ________________________________ PRICE: Daily . . . . . One Cent —│ Sunday . . . . Five Cents BY MAIL outside Philadelphia Daily, one month, 25c. One Year $3.00. Daily and Sunday, one mo., 50c. One year $5.30 _______________________________ Telephones: Bell, 3000 Walnut. Keystone, Main 3000 _________________________________ ENTERED AT THE PHILADELPHIA POSTOFFICE AS SECOND-CLASS MAIL MATTER. _________________________________ PHILADELPHIA, MONDAY, APRIL 21, 1913. _________________________________ SENATOR PENROSE REPREHENDETH YE "STEAM ROLLER." Senator Penrose in the interesting interview printed in yesterday's PUBLIC LEDGER makes a spirited attack upon the Democractic method of framing a tariff bill in a close caucus and the refusal to grant anything like adequate hearings upon doubtful sections in most important schedules. Mr. Penrose denounces the Democrats for their aggresive, downright, tyrannous practice; declares that when the bill comes before the Senate he proposes to have a thorough debate, and asserts that the "steam roller" which the oposition is now using so ruthlessly is a rough and brutal tool, unscientific and anachronistic.

It is to be hoped that Mr. Penrose will insist upon a discussion; the House will also undoubtedly debate the bill; it is too true that the accepted methods of framing tariff bills, whether they be named McKinley orDingley, or Paynealdrich or Underwood, are not defensible. There is scarcely any doubt that the method employed by Mr. Emery, of Mr. Taft's tariff board, is infinitely safer and more businesslike than the plan that has been followed since tariff bills have been made in this country.

Get the facts; collate and digest them; study the industries here and abroad; find the cost of production; compare efficiency, contrast the wages and other factors and then attempt in a deliberative fashion to reach a definite conclusion based on truth and the facts.

That is the scientific method not only proposed but actually carried out by the Taft tariff board, and if the Democrats remain in power they, too, must in future adopt such plan. If at this time a steam roller is rumbling down the highways of trade and commerce who must take the responsibility? Mr Penrose cannot escape his share of it: the Republican party must accept its share; the old "standpat" dyed-in-the-wool regulars long in control of Mr. Penrose's party must bear the onus. Paye and Aldrich, Cannon and Penrose, Mann and Dalzell—they and men like them, the dominant figures in the Republican party— brought about the present tariff revision, and it is due to them also that steam rollers and not tariff boards are shaping tariff bills.

If Mr. Penrose had talked in this resonable and statesmanlike way when the Payne-Aldrich tariff bill was being forced through he would have been rendering a real service to his party and to his country. Steam rollers? All tariff bills are jammed through by steam-roller methods and when the Payne-Aldrich bill us under discussion the lumbering machine rolled over not only the Democrats but even the Republican [?]

[column 2] a scientific plan for the nonpartisan handling of tariff bills. In the present exigency they must accept a Democratic bill framed just about like all other tariff bills; and if, as Mr. Penrose says, there is apprehension, that is bebecause in this serious endeavor the path is "so slippery that the fear's as bad as falling." ____________________________ THE MORGAN WILL. There is found in the will of J. P. Morgan no bounteous provision for great charitable enterprises. He left his name by philanthropic disposition of funds which, in the fulfilment of human destiny, were to be no longer of use to him. There is in the document no quibble with his conscience, no evidence of intent to buy by legacy his way into the Kingdom of Heaven.

He had given largely while he lived where giving did the most good and he left a perpetual heritage to his country in the form of an accumlation of art treasures which more than rivals the trophies of Napoleon's victories; for, though in the disposition of it, as in the disposition of all else, he emphasized his confidence in his executors and heirs by refusing to bind them with conditions, his wish will be sufficient to render the several collections "permanently available for the instruction and pleasure of the American people." They are thus his legatees to the extent of more than half his fortune.

There is a wonderful humanness in the document. He remembers all of his servants, some close friends to whom an increased income will be a real benefit, all of his business employes, and provides that those whom he has accustomed to aid regularly shall continue to receive assistance from his estate. And he has brought the world up short in its mad worship of materialism, for he who seemed to the unthinking public to be the very embodiment of that ideal, in the first sentence of his last testament lease unto his heirs and through them to the world, his richest legacy his own belief in the insufficiency of man and the all-sufficiency of God. It is an extraordinary and striking utterance. It is a trumpet call and a challenge to Christianity. "I commit my soul into the hands of my Savior." ___________________________ A FAR-REACHING MOVEMENT.

The PUBLIC LEDGER most earnestly invites the attention of its readers to the appeal which the joint organization for Equalizing Industrial Opportunities and the League of Civic and Political Reform is making another part of this issue for funds to conduct the revolutionary movement which it is undertaking in behalf of the negro race. Those back of this movement have spent years and years, at great personal sacrifice, in evolving the principles upon which it seeks to operate. No appeals for funds were ever made till they were in a position to put these theories into immediate and practical operation. There is none of the radical, bizarre or spectacular in this effort. Those back of it are noted for their staid conservatism and sober commonsense.

The generosity of the public has of late been taxed to the utmost for charities of various kinds, and because of the dire calamities which have befallen the country. But the needs of this organization are excedingly modest. So simple are its plans that $5000 will cover its present demands, and probably place it in a position to make this its last as well as its first public appeal for funds.

The conditions which inspire this movement represent a rising flood of antipathy and antagonism between the races which if not checked will eventually create a lamentable and dangerous situation which will prove a

[column 3] permanent solution of the difficulty be obtained.

The fault lies in what may be called a "joker" in the Constitution. It has been decided that a treaty is the supreme law of the land. Yet treaties are made without the consent of tthe popular house at Washington. It is within the poer of the President and the Senate to make pacts that will entirely viliate the whole revenue system, impair or destroy the reserved rights of several States and render ineffective legislation which Congress as a whole may have made.

It is rumored that this phase of the situation has appealed forcibly to the President and the Secretary of State and that such treaties as are hereafter offered to the Senate for ratification will contain a clause to the effect that no provision of it shall be construed to as as an annulment of the general law of the Union or to vitiate the rights which the several States, under the Constitution, have reserved to themselves. Be that as it may, a new treaty with Japan is imperative or renewed efforts for exculsion in California will precipitate other and more dangerous crimes. What is wanted now is breathing space and it will not discredit this great nation or Californiat to act with extreme patience in an effort to calm Oriental hysteria. The administration simply needs time in which to settle decisively, through diplomacy, the status of the Japanese in the United States. ________________________________ THE KRUPP SCANDAL IN GERMANY.

The charges brought by the Socialist Deputy Liebknecht, in the Reichstag, that the great Krupp works at Essen have been maintaining secret and irregular communications with the German War Department have lost none of their effectiveness by the admission of the Krupps that they maintained "friendly relations" with the Government for the purpose of "obtaining business information," and even "exerted pressure" on certain subordinates. It has generally been supposed in this country that the Krupp estalishment was a quasi-governmental institution, in the full confidence of the established authorities and in a position to obtain what information is desired. The contrary is true, however, and Germany is gasping at a revelation of corruption of the type which is popularly supposed in Europe to exist only in the United States.

Just how far the revelations will chill the enthusiasm of the ardent patriots who have been shouting for the new war levies is conjectural, but as the Krupp establishment would profit tremendously by the proposed expenditures it may be that national resentment will express itself in decisive demonstrations in opposition to the whole programme of the Government. Impartiality and frankness in the investigation under way may soothe public opinion, but any disposition to substitute scapegoats for the real offeners is likely to provoke a political crisis. ___________________________________ A significant tendency in the various States is the larger use of direct taxation. For instance, Ohio will get its $700,000 a year to pay the pensions for mothers by a tax of one-tenth of a mill. Good roads have doubled the direct taxes of several States. In other States there are efforts to get a direct tax for agriculture, as much as a mill. The direct tax makes itself known rather more bluntly than the other kinds of taxation and it has educational value. _________________________________ Unnecessary Judges, dual officeholders, legislative sinecures and the whole list of extravagance and worse make the selfrespecting Pennsylvanian turn his eyes away from Harrisburg and wonder when this State will ever be redeemed from the spoilers. _________________________________ Boston's Chamber of Commerce is sending fifty business men to investigate the trade opportunities of [?]

[column 4] TOPICS OF THE TOWN

Philadelphia's filtration plant has cost pehaps $30,000,000. It looks like a big sum of money, but this town never before made a better monetary investment. Pure water has reduced the death rate at least by three in every one thousand inhabitants. It has resulted in preventing double that numver of cases of sickness.

There are now in Philadelphia 1,750,000 people. A saving of three lives in every one thousand of population each year means more than 5000 lives. Double that many cases of sickness or 10,000 in addition to the deaths have been prevented.

It is difficult to estimate just how much in money 5000 deaths and 10,000 additional cases of sickness amount to. The average for each death, I am informed by veteran physicians, sould exceed $200 and for each other case of sick-- ness $100. Thus a former money loss of $2,000,000 is saved, which is more than 6 per cent, on the total cost of the filtration plant.

But who can begin to estimate the saving in suffering and money? And yet when the filtration works were put in there was a great outcry about the expense. Just now we hear a similar denunciation of the cost of the Broad street subway. But that too, will prove a cheap investment. When you multiply the time saved each day by one person going up or down town, by the scores of thousands whose minutes will be saved, it will far outmatch the interest on $43,000,000 of original cost.

Was it ever your misfortune to have to visit a physician? If so, I'm sure you must have been impressed by the great number of other persons who were similarly afflicted. Did you ever go into a popular doctor's waiting room and not find someone waiting ahead of you and more coming after you? You never did. I feel confident in saying that. There is a constant procession in and out.

Now it happens that there are a couple of thousand physicians in this city, all more or less popular, at least, until it comes to to pay your bill. In each one of these offices people throng. So it must happen every morning say at 10 o'clock that there are from five to ten thousand persons in doctor's waiting rooms at one time. It would seem as if half the town were being invalided.

It is no reflection upon the medical profession when I say that, measured alone by the number of visitors, the town never appears to recover. The throng continues as big as ever.

In one doctor's outer office there are 15 chairs, so he himself tells me, for I have not seen them, and often a waiting patient sits upon each of them.

I wonder if the crowds would grow less if the Chinese method were introduced. There the physicians are paid to keep people well and not to cure them after they become ill.

A COUNTRYMAN came to the city and was struck with the fact that many persons seemed to prefer to buy highpriced things just because they were high priced. This set him to thinking. He knew something about making candy.

Why not, inquired him of himself, make a good quality of candy and then ask from 25 to 50 cents more for it than any other candy in the market? If folks damand simply a high price, why not give it to them?

Acting on that idea he produced a candy of about the same quality that other confectioners sold, but made the price so much higher that many persons imaged it must be of a far superior brand. That idea of advertising a commodity by merely charging an exorbitant price for it made him successful and rich. People were humbugged by the price tag.

THE AMERICAN flight to Europe has started again in earnest. Each spring witnesses an exodus of people with fat letters of credit. Each late summer and autumn sees them homne again with a lean letter, but a new sensation or two. country's capital, because foreign travelers carry abroad as much as 100,000,000 every year. It is a big drain on the country's capital, because foreign trav-

[column 5] AN APPEAL FOR FUNDS IN BEHALF OF THE NEGRO RACE. At Least $5000 is needed Immediately to Begin Campaign to Curb Vicous Elements.

There are, perhaps, few persons whose feelings toward the negro race have not been adversely affected becasue of the venal, vicious, rowdy and ruffianly elements among them. No one will seriously deny that it is largely because of this relatively small but conspicuous element that the race is being more and more subjected to every form of discrimination and proscription. This being a fact, it logically follows that these hardships can be assauged only in proportion as the factors producing them are overcome.

The joint organization of the Association of Equalizing Industrial Opportunities and the League of Civic and Political Reform, representing the crystallized thought and labor of a lifetime, has the dual purpose of constraining the refractory elements among negroes to conform to the laws of decency and order and of broadening the opportunities of that race to work for an honest living. This organization is founded on the proposition that the only possible means of righteously adjusting relations between the races lies in upright negroes combining especially through their churches, to curb such disturbing elements as are mentioned above, and in upright white people agreeing, especially through their churches, to apply such rules of social and economic justice in their dealings with negroes as measurably accord with the accepted ideas of Christian civilization.

Applying these principles, the League of Civic and Political Reform will co-operate with municipal authorities in eradicating from among negroes all questionable reports, habitual corner lounging, rowdyism and public indecency. It also will urge that all negroes who are habitual idlers from choice be either forced to earn an honest living or subjected to prosecution as common vagrants. The Association for Equalizing Industrial Opportunities will take up jointly with the owners and employees of specified industrial concerns the question of merited recognition of colored labor.

For the purpose of opening and maintaining headquarters, extending the cause, disseminating literature and maintaining copentent workers, this organization is in pressing need of at least $5000. The undersigned persons, who are thoroughly conversant with the plans and scope of this movement, believe that for alleviating the every-day problems of the negro, improving public relations between the races and advancing the cause of good government it represents a work of boundless value which the vital interests of society must sustain in sheer self defense.

All contributions should be sent in the PUBLIC LEDGER, which will deposit the final amount in trust for this organization, to be withdrawn only through the joint written instructions of Dr. A. J. Rowland, secretary of the American Baptist Publication Society, 1701 Chestnut street; Henry W. Wilbur, secretary of the Annual Conference of Friends, 139 North Fifteenth street, and Dr. John W. Lee, pastor of the first African Presbyterian Church, 741 South Seventeenth street, who by special request of the promoters of this cause will supervise the expenditure of every cent.

FRANK P. PARKIN, superintendent Central District, Philadelphia Conference Methodist Episcopal Church.

Dr. A. J. ROWLAND, secretary American Baptist Publication Society.

HENRY W. WILBUR, secretary Annual Conference of Friends.

JOHN WATHORN, pastor Central Methodist Episcopal Church.

C. A. TINDLEY, past Calvary Methodist Episcopal Church.

JOHN W. LEE, pastor First African Presbyterian Chuch.

P. A. WALLACE, pastor Zion Wesley African Methodist Episcopal Church. _________________________________________ SUNDAY "COMICS" Comment Upon Their Discontinuance in the "Public Ledger."

To the Editor of the Public Ledger:

Sir—The letters to the PUBLIC LEDGER so consistently approving the discontinuance of the Sunday comics remind me of when I was a kid and, with other kids, played pots and commons on a lot owned by a man said to have been 65 years old. Well, here's how old he was to us—we peppered his knuckles as hard as we did ours. Now, opposite lived some people who objected to us for our noise, but being on private property with permission they were helpless to remove us. Yet, secretly, they purchased that lot and a church was built upon it.

I meet these boys, now men, and chatting over those days, we never can decide whether those people bought that lot to get rid of us or of that gray-haired "kid."

BEN COLL. Philadelphia, April 16, 1913

To the Editor of the Public Ledger: Sir—When first we missed getting what the little folks call the "funny part" of the Public Ledger we supposed it mislaid in some way, but since we have learned it is discontinued we are satisfied that it is for the best

Last edit about 3 years ago by Harpwench
767
Needs Review

767

[column 1]

Bell, 3000 Walnut. Keystone, Main 3000 _________________________________ ENTERED AT THE PHILADELPHIA POSTOFFICE AS SECOND-CLASS MAIL MATTER. _________________________________ PHILADELPHIA, MONDAY, APRIL 21, 1913. _________________________________ SENATOR PENROSE REPREHENDETH YE "STEAM ROLLER." Senator Penrose in the interesting interview printed in yesterday's PUBLIC LEDGER makes a spirited attack upon the Democractic method of framing a tariff bill in a close caucus and the refusal to grant anything like adequate hearings upon doubtful sections in most important schedules. Mr. Penrose denounces the Democrats for their aggresive, downright, tyrannous practice; declares that when the bill comes before the Senate he proposes to have a thorough debate, and asserts that the "steam roller" which the oposition is now using so ruthlessly is a rough and brutal tool, unscientific and anachronistic.

It is to be hoped that Mr. Penrose will insist upon a discussion; the House will also undoubtedly debate the bill; it is too true that the accepted methods of framing tariff bills, whether they be named McKinley orDingley, or Paynealdrich or Underwood, are not defensible. There is scarcely any doubt that the method employed by Mr. Emery, of Mr. Taft's tariff board, is infinitely safer and more businesslike than the plan that has been followed since tariff bills have been made in this country.

Get the facts; collate and digest them; study the industries here and abroad; find the cost of production; compare efficiency, contrast the wages and other factors and then attempt in a deliberative fashion to reach a definite conclusion based on truth and the facts.

That is the scientific method not only proposed but actually carried out by the Taft tariff board, and if the Democrats remain in power they, too, must in future adopt such plan. If at this time a steam roller is rumbling down the highways of trade and commerce who must take the responsibility? Mr Penrose cannot escape his share of it: the Republican party must accept its share; the old "standpat" dyed-in-the-wool regulars long in control of Mr. Penrose's party must bear the onus. Paye and Aldrich, Cannon and Penrose, Mann and Dalzell—they and men like them, the dominant figures in the Republican party— brought about the present tariff revision, and it is due to them also that steam rollers and not tariff boards are shaping tariff bills.

If Mr. Penrose had talked in this resonable and statesmanlike way when the Payne-Aldrich tariff bill was being forced through he would have been rendering a real service to his party and to his country. Steam rollers? All tariff bills are jammed through by steam-roller methods and when the Payne-Aldrich bill us under discussion the lumbering machine rolled over not only the Democrats but even the Republican Progressives, Tariff legislation in America is a synonym for ruthless methods and apparently the only way to remedy the abuse and to awaken the public conscience to the enormity of playing hide-and-seek with the steam roller in the hands of the opposition for one and let the other party see how it works.

The McKinley bill was the product of a steam roller and something much more dangerous—it was the outcome of a deal by which the Republican managers got their tariff while the silverites got the Sherman silver purchase act which later on dangerously depleted the treasury reserves, nearly threw the country upon the silver basis and finaly wrecked the Democratic party through Cleveland's heroic measures for rescuing the nation's honor and credit. The crucial battle in that great contest was fought in 1896 against the Byranized Democracy. Republicans and sound money Democrats

[column 2] he left a perpetual heritage to his country in the form of an accumlation of art treasures which more than rivals the trophies of Napoleon's victories; for, though in the disposition of it, as in the disposition of all else, he emphasized his confidence in his executors and heirs by refusing to bind them with conditions, his wish will be sufficient to render the several collections "permanently available for the instruction and pleasure of the American people." They are thus his legatees to the extent of more than half his fortune.

There is a wonderful humanness in the document. He remembers all of his servants, some close friends to whom an increased income will be a real benefit, all of his business employes, and provides that those whom he has accustomed to aid regularly shall continue to receive assistance from his estate. And he has brought the world up short in its mad worship of materialism, for he who seemed to the unthinking public to be the very embodiment of that ideal, in the first sentence of his last testament lease unto his heirs and through them to the world, his richest legacy his own belief in the insufficiency of man and the all-sufficiency of God. It is an extraordinary and striking utterance. It is a trumpet call and a challenge to Christianity. "I commit my soul into the hands of my Savior." ___________________________ A FAR-REACHING MOVEMENT.

The PUBLIC LEDGER most earnestly invites the attention of its readers to the appeal which the joint organization for Equalizing Industrial Opportunities and the League of Civic and Political Reform is making another part of this issue for funds to conduct the revolutionary movement which it is undertaking in behalf of the negro race. Those back of this movement have spent years and years, at great personal sacrifice, in evolving the principles upon which it seeks to operate. No appeals for funds were ever made till they were in a position to put these theories into immediate and practical operation. There is none of the radical, bizarre or spectacular in this effort. Those back of it are noted for their staid conservatism and sober commonsense.

The generosity of the public has of late been taxed to the utmost for charities of various kinds, and because of the dire calamities which have befallen the country. But the needs of this organization are excedingly modest. So simple are its plans that $5000 will cover its present demands, and probably place it in a position to make this its last as well as its first public appeal for funds.

The conditions which inspire this movement represent a rising flood of antipathy and antagonism between the races which if not checked will eventually create a lamentable and dangerous situation which will prove a reproach to American humanity and intelligence.

This organization represents an immediately operative and widely effective method for dealing with this situation. There are scores of liberty-loving persons in this city who could easily advance every cent needed by this organization for the prosecution of its noble mission. There is not an individual in this city, or in this country, for that matter, who in any way comes in contact with the opposite race, to whom the work of this organization is not of direct personal interest. Surely such persons will not allow the modest appeal of this organization for funds to be made in vain. The PUBLIC LEDGER will gladly recive any amount which is given for this cause. ____________________________________ NEW TREATY WITH JAPAN NECESSARY.

The action of the responsible officers

[column 3] under the Constitution, [?] to themselves. Be that as it may, a new treaty with Japan is imperative or renewed efforts for exclusion in California will precipitate other and more dangerous crises. What is wanted now is breathing space and it will not discredit this great nation or California to act with extreme patience in an effort to calm Oriental hysteria. The Administration simply needs time in which to settle decisively, through diplomacy, that status of the Japanese in the United States.

THE KRUPP SCANDAL IN GERMANY.

The charges brought by the Socialist Deputy Liebknecht, in the Reichstag, that the great Krupp works at Essen have been maintaining secret and irregular communications with the German War Department have lost none of their effectiveness by the admission of the Krupps that they maintained "friendly relations" with the Government for the purpose of "obtaining business information," and even "exerted pressure" on certain subordinates. It has generally been supposed in this country that the Krupp estalishment was a quasi-governmental institution, in the full confidence of the established authorities and in a position to obtain what information is desired. The contrary is true, however, and Germany is gasping at a revelation of corruption of the type which is popularly supposed in Europe to exist only in the United States.

Just how far the revelations will chill the enthusiasm of the ardent patriots who have been shouting for the new war levies is conjectural, but as the Krupp establishment would profit tremendously by the proposed expenditures it may be that national resentment will express itself in decisive demonstrations in opposition to the whole programme of the Government. Impartiality and frankness in the investigation under way may soothe public opinion, but any disposition to substitute scapegoats for the real offeners is likely to provoke a political crisis. _________________________________

A significant tendency in the various States is the larger use of direct taxation. For instance, Ohio will get its $700,000 a year to pay the pensions for mothers by a tax of one-tenth of a mill. Good roads have doubled the direct taxes of several States. In other States there are efforts to get a direct tax for agriculture, as much as a mill. The direct tax makes itself known rather more bluntly than the other kinds of taxation and it has educational value. _________________________________ Unnecessary Judges, dual officeholders, legislative sinecures and the whole list of extravagance and worse make the selfrespecting Pennsylvanian turn his eyes away from Harrisburg and wonder when this State will ever be redeemed from the spoilers. _________________________________ Boston's Chamber of Commerce is sending fifty business men to investigate the trade opportunities of Panama and South America. If we had persuaded our business bodies to unite, perhaps Philadelphia would be doing something like this. ____________________________________ In his very successful essay Thomas Jefferson said all men were born free and equal; but they don't keep that way long, especially when Jefferson's party has an income tax and $4000 exemptions. __________________________________ We don't mind Japan going on the rampage and singing war songs, but we tremble when we think of the effect on Hobson. __________________________________ If the inheritance tax keeps up its pace New York will soon be able to spend another hundred millions on public highways. _________________________________ The Senate bathrooms have been closed. Many of the Senators never could understand what they were there for, anyhow. ___________________________________ It is the tragedy of municipal reform in America that every good Mayor is embarrased by the City Councils. ___________________________________

[column 4] when the filtration works were put in there was a great outcry about the expense. Just now we hear a similar denunciation of the cost of the Broad street subway. But that too, will prove a cheap investment. When you multiply the time saved each day by one person going up or down town, by the scores of thousands whose minutes will be saved, it will far outmatch the interest on $43,000,000 of original cost. ------------- Was it ever your misfortune to have to visit a physician? If so, I'm sure you must have been impressed by the great number of other persons who were similarly afflicted. Did you ever go into a popular doctor's waiting room and not find someone waiting ahead of you and more coming after you? You never did. I feel confident in saying that. There is a constant procession in and out.

Now it happens that there are a couple of thousand physicians in this city, all more or less popular, at least, until it comes to to pay your bill. In each one of these offices people throng. So it must happen every morning say at 10 o'clock that there are from five to ten thousand persons in doctor's waiting rooms at one time. It would seem as if half the town were being invalided.

It is no reflection upon the medical profession when I say that, measured alone by the number of visitors, the town never appears to recover. The throng continues as big as ever.

In one doctor's outer office there are 15 chairs, so he himself tells me, for I have not seen them, and often a waiting patient sits upon each of them.

I wonder if the crowds would grow less if the Chinese method were introduced. There the physicians are paid to keep people well and not to cure them after they become ill. -------------------------------- A COUNTRYMAN came to the city and was struck with the fact that many persons seemed to prefer to buy highpriced things just because they were high priced. This set him to thinking. He knew something about making candy.

Why not, inquired him of himself, make a good quality of candy and then ask from 25 to 50 cents more for it than any other candy in the market? If folks damand simply a high price, why not give it to them?

Acting on that idea he produced a candy of about the same quality that other confectioners sold, but made the price so much higher that many persons imaged it must be of a far superior brand. That idea of advertising a commodity by merely charging an exorbitant price for it made him successful and rich. People were humbugged by the price tag.

This country has in it many people having such easy money that they do not know the value of a dollar. They look no further than the label; then buy what costs the most. ---------------------------------------- THE AMERICAN flight to Europe has started again in earnest. Each spring witnesses an exodus of people with fat letters of credit. Each late summer and autumn sees them homne again with a lean letter, but a new sensation or two. country's capital, because foreign travelers carry abroad as much as 100,000,000 every year. It is a big drain on the country's capital, because foreign travelers do not fetch into the United States $5,000,000 a year. American tourists cut a real figure in international finance. European bankers invariably take the gold these travelers carry with them into account just as they figure up the amount of interest and dividends that goes from the United States upon securities owned abroad.

It pays Paris to keep up its title as the world's chief show place. It is the best possible investment of the kind any city on earth possesses, because tourists pour into that capital scores of millions every year.

Incidentally I often wonder why more Americans who go to Europe do not go earlier in the year. When the average tourist reaches Paris, London or Berlin in July or August they are coming to Philadelphia in the same months. They are seen in their greatest charm in the spring. GIRARD

in upright negroes combining especially through their churches, to curb such disturbing elements as are mentioned above, and in upright white people agreeing, especially through their churches, to apply such rules of social and economic justice in their dealings with negroes as measurably accord with the accepted ideas of Christian civilization.

Applying these principles, the League of Civic and Political Reform will co-operate with municipal authorities in eradicating from among negroes all questionable reports, habitual corner lounging, rowdyism and public indecency. It also will urge that all negroes who are habitual idlers from choice be either forced to earn an honest living or subjected to prosecution as common vagrants. The Association for Equalizing Industrial Opportunities will take up jointly with the owners and employees of specified industrial concerns the question of merited recognition of colored labor.

For the purpose of opening and maintaining headquarters, extending the cause, disseminating literature and maintaining copentent workers, this organization is in pressing need of at least $5000. The undersigned persons, who are thoroughly conversant with the plans and scope of this movement, believe that for alleviating the every-day problems of the negro, improving public relations between the races and advancing the cause of good government it represents a work of boundless value which the vital interests of society must sustain in sheer self defense.

All contributions should be sent in the PUBLIC LEDGER, which will deposit the final amount in trust for this organization, to be withdrawn only through the joint written instructions of Dr. A. J. Rowland, secretary of the American Baptist Publication Society, 1701 Chestnut street; Henry W. Wilbur, secretary of the Annual Conference of Friends, 139 North Fifteenth street, and Dr. John W. Lee, pastor of the first African Presbyterian Church, 741 South Seventeenth street, who by special request of the promoters of this cause will supervise the expenditure of every cent.

FRANK P. PARKIN, superintendent Central District, Philadelphia Conference Methodist Episcopal Church.

Dr. A. J. ROWLAND, secretary American Baptist Publication Society.

HENRY W. WILBUR, secretary Annual Conference of Friends.

JOHN WATHORN, pastor Central Methodist Episcopal Church.

C. A. TINDLEY, past Calvary Methodist Episcopal Church.

JOHN W. LEE, pastor First African Presbyterian Chuch.

P. A. WALLACE, pastor Zion Wesley African Methodist Episcopal Church. _________________________________________ SUNDAY "COMICS" Comment Upon Their Discontinuance in the "Public Ledger."

To the Editor of the Public Ledger:

Sir—The letters to the PUBLIC LEDGER so consistently approving the discontinuance of the Sunday comics remind me of when I was a kid and, with other kids, played pots and commons on a lot owned by a man said to have been 65 years old. Well, here's how old he was to us—we peppered his knuckles as hard as we did ours. Now, opposite lived some people who objected to us for our noise, but being on private property with permission they were helpless to remove us. Yet, secretly, they purchased that lot and a church was built upon it.

I meet these boys, now men, and chatting over those days, we never can decide whether those people bought that lot to get rid of us or of that gray-haired "kid."

BEN COLL. Philadelphia, April 16, 1913

To the Editor of the Public Ledger: Sir—When first we missed getting what the little folks call the "funny part" of the Public Ledger we supposed it mislaid in some way, but since we have learned it is discontinued we are satisfied that it is for the best. Although the comic sheets have been universal in all city papers, many of your readers have no doubt thought it was somewhat out of its element in your worthy PUBLIC LEDGER, not, indeed, that we would pretend to be too sanctimonious to enjoy "now and then" what is relished by the "best of men" but one cannot help feeling that the exaggerated frolics at the expense of the older characters are not calculated to elevate the youthful minds to have proper esteem for their elderly friends or people as they go through life. But our PUBLIC LEDGER is now, and ever since I have any remembrance of it, a requisite and a household treasure, and especially of late years, with its many splendid features of dependable news, fine editorials, business opportunities and delightful Sunday treats. Congratulations and continued sucess to Philadelphia's PUBLIC LEDGER. McCODVILLE. Philadelphia, April 15, 1913 ___________________________________ STARBOARD AND PORT ___________________________________ A Seadog Discusses the Altered Vocabulary of the Deep.

To the Editor of the Public Ledger: Sir—It seems that the Honorable the Secretary of the Navy of the United States of America, Josephus Daniels, of North Carolina, has called all hands aft and admonished those who go down to the sea in ships. Through trumpet from the quarter-deck of his department he proclaims the death of "port" and "starboard" and that "left" and "right

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The league is planning a campaign of education for the initiative and referendum, and a fund will be raised for the purpose.

The completed hull of the steamship A. Brooke Taylor slipped from the ways in the yards of the American Car and Foundry Company this morning, just as Miss Georgianna Coxe broke a bottle of wine on the bow and gave the craft its name. She is the daughter of William G. Coxe, president of the Harlan & Holingsworth Corporation, at the plant of which the new craft will have the machinery installed. The stearmship, when completed, will be used in the menhaden fisheries business. ------------------------------- Complying with a summons received by them several days ago, the members of the commission that will have charge of the construction of the joint city hall and county court house, today had a conerence with the Judges of the State [urts?] in their parlors in the court house. The commission was appointed by the [dges?]. They took the opportunty to explain to the commissioners the law relative to the act authorising their appointment and the construction of the new buildings and they admonished them not to exceed their appropriation. After the brief conference the commissioners met in the offices of Harlan G. Scott for organization. Mr. Scott was elected chairman and L. Scott Townsend, treasurer. ----------------------------------- In a paper he read before the members of the New Castle County Medical Society, Edgar M. Hoopes, Jr., chief engineer of the Water Department, proved to the satisfaction of the physicians that the danger of typhoid fever in this city has been elminated. This is due, he asserted, to the present system of filtration. _________________________ CHARTERED FOR $95,000.000 Chile Copper Company Incorporated Under Delaware Laws. [SPECIAL TELEGRAM TO THE PUBLIC LEDGER.]

DOVER, Del., April 16.—A spectal messenger from Wilmingion brought to the office of the Secretary of State here late this afternoon a charter for the Chile Copper Company, with a capital stock of $95,000,000, the objects and purposes being to prospect, explore and generally deal in and with minerals and ores of all kind anywhere if the world. The incorporators include local Wilmington men, Herert J. Latter, W. J. Maloney and Oscar J. Reichard. The provisions of the charter allow an office in New York city. The State tax paid with the filing was $4850. ------------------------------------------------- DOVER EDITOR MARRIES [SPECIAL TELEGRAM TO THE PUBLIC LEDGER.]

DOVER., Del, April 16.— Thomas Franes Dunn, publisher and manager of the Dover Index, and Miss Kate Shakespeare Haman, also of Dover, were married here at 1 o'clock today at the home of the bride, on Division street, by the Rev. William L. White, pastor of Wesley, Methodist Episcopal Church, of this town, of which the bride is an active worker and influential member. ---------------------------------------------- SPREAD GOSPEL BY BOAT Baptist Missionary Asks for Money to Buy Launch.

The Rev. Guy C. Lamson begins his administration as missionary and Bible secretary of the American Baptist Publication Society by appealing to the Bapist churches for $1000 with which to complete a chapel launch to operate among the islands of Puget Sound. The launch which will cost something more than $3000, will be christened the Robert C. Seymour, in honor of the Rev. Mr. Lamson's predecessor.

Mr. Lamson's department already has one large colportage cruiser, the "Lifeline" which carries Gospel privileges to 30,000 people.

"There are nearly 100 towns on Puget Sound that can be reached only by boat," said Mr. Lamson yesterday. "More than one-half of these communities have nochurch, Sunday school or religious work of any kind." ------------------------------------------------ COLORED METHODISTS MEET) Bishop Warns Ministers Against Dabbling in Politics.

The 41st session of the Philadelphia and Washington Conference of the Colored Methodist Episcopal Church was held in Mt. Zion Church, Sharon Hill, yesterday. Bishop C. R. Williams, of Augusta, presided.

The bishop said he was opposed to ministers dabbling in politics. Organization was effected as follows:

L. E. B. Rasser, Washington, D. C. secretary; J. L. Carroll, this city, assistant secretary; A. W. Womack, Washington, D. C., statistician; C. L. Knox. Washington, D. C, reporter.

The conference will continue untll Monday.

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L 17, 1913. ***9

[column 1] a co-operative beneficial society designed to aid members whose income is cut off on account of sickness, will be formed.

Every employe who has been in the company's service 30 days is eligible to membership in the association. Members pay 25 cents per month dues. In case of illness the association will pay members $1 per day for 100 days. There will be a death benent of $150. The company declares that the cost of maintenance and carrying on the business will not be placed on the employes, but will be borne by the company itself. ---------------------------- PLANS FOR NEW SCHOOL The Goucester City Board of Education yesterday at a meeting held in the

[column 2] DELAWARE Levy Court Decides Route for Proposed Improvements on State Roads. ---------------------------------- PLANS CONTINUOUS HIGHWAY ----------------------------------- [SPECIAL TELEGRAM TO THE PUBLIC LEDGER.]

WILMINGTON, Del., April 18.—Within a few months it is expected that there will be a continuous good road from this city to the Kent County line, as the New Castle County Levy Court at its meeting today decided to take what is known as the western route for the improvement.

As soon as the surveys are made the actual work of the road building will begin following the programme mapped out by County Engineer James Wilson. The project will be carried out under a bond issue of $200,000 for the construction of improved roads in this county, the stipulation being that $100,000 of this amount should be used on the bad stretches of road between this city and the Kent County line so that there wilt be a continuous highway. The route selected is by the way of Glasgow, Summit Bridge Pencader and Mount Pleasant into Middletown, and from there to Blackbird and on to Dutch Creek, where it will strike the Kent line.

In the extreme northern part of the county above Wilmingion there are three short stretches of road to be built in order to connect the good roads of this county with three new ones in Pennsylvania.

It is expected that the Delaware road will be connected with roads in Pennsylvania under the Sproul bill. The Levy Court is also seriously considering the best method of maintaining the roads of the county, and it is probable that the patrol system will be adopted; that is, a force of men will be kept constantly at work on the roads in different parts of the county. ------------------------------------- At a meeting of the members of the Initative and Referendum League there was a lively discussion over the refusal of the street and sewer directors to grant a franchise to the People's Company to operate an electric lighting plant in this city in competition with the Wilmington and Philadelphia Traction Company. Some of the speakers declared that with the initiative and referendum in force the people would be able to decide the matter, and the Wilmington and Philadelphia Traction Company would not have a monopoly. Other speakers did not think much of the competition idea in public utilities, but said that the city should own its electric lighting system. The league is planning a campaion of education for the initiative and referendum, and a fund will be raised for the purpose. ---------------------------- The completed hull of the steamship A. Brooke Taylor slipped from the ways in the yards of the American Car and Foundry Company this morning, just as Miss Georgianna Coxe broke a bottle of wine on the bow and gave the craft its name. She is the daughter of William G. Coxe, president of the Harlan & Holingsworth Corporation, at the plant of which the new craft will have the machinery installed. The stearmship, when completed, will be used in the menhaden fisheries business. ------------------------------- Complying with a summons received by them several days ago, the members of the commission that will have charge of the construction of the joint city hall and county court house, today had a conerence with the Judges of the State [urts?] in their parlors in the court house. The commission was appointed by the [dges?]. They took the opportunty to explain to the commissioners the law relative to the act authorising their appointment and the construction of the new buildings and they admonished them not to exceed their appropriation. After the brief conference the commissioners met in the offices of Harlan G. Scott for organization. Mr. Scott was elected chairman and L. Scott Townsend, treasurer. ----------------------------------- In a paper he read before the members of the New Castle County Medical Society, Edgar M. Hoopes, Jr., chief engineer of the Water Department, proved to the satisfaction of the physicians that the danger of typhoid fever in this city has been elminated. This is due, he asserted, to the present system of filtration. _________________________ CHARTERED FOR $95,000.000 Chile Copper Company Incorporated Under Delaware Laws.

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PRIL 16, 1913 9

[column 1] JURY CENSURES AUTOISTS

Testimony Shows Car Which Killed Girl Was Speeding. [FROM PUBLIC LEDGER BUREAU.]

PRINCETON, N. J., April 15—Censure for the automobile accident of April 6, by which Miss Mae Durea, the 17-year-old Princeton schoolgirl, was killed and left by the roadside, today place on [?] the wealthy Brooklyn

[column 2] DELAWARE Directors Refuse Competitive Lighting Company Permission to Use Streets of City. ------------------- CONVICTS MAY WORK ROADS ----------------------- [SPECIAL TELEGRAM TO THE PUBLIC LEDGER.] WILMINGTON, Del., April 15.—The directors of the Street and Sewer Department today unanimously refused the application of the People's Light, Heat and Power Company, a subsidiary corporation of the People's Railway Company, for permission to use the streets for the purpose of furnishing light and power in competition with the Wilmington and Philadelphia Traction Company. Just before the franchise was refused a communication was received from representatives of the National Progressive party in this city asking many questions requesting that the directors delay action on the franchise until those questions had been answered. Some of the questions were replied to by President Sparks, of the board, who stated that some of the others would not be answered, as the board had all the information it desired with respect to the matter.

In declining the franchise the directors of the franchise would be of no permanent benefit to the city. A history was given of other franchises that had been granted the competative purposes with the result that one company is now in control. The directors objected to the duplication of poles and wires that would follow the franchise. They said that lighting rates were as low in Wilmington as in other cities and as low as could be reasonably expected under competition. ----------------------------- It is quite probable that the Levy Court will make an agreement with the trustees of the New Castle County workhouse whereby a corps of convicts will be utilized in the work of maintaining the county roads. Upon invitation of ex-Judge J. Frank Ball and T. Allen Hilles, trustees of the workhouse, the members of the Levy Court will visit Greenbank tomorrow where they can see the work done by the convicts. Mr. Hilles is enthusiastic over the plan to employ the convicts as a patrol force in repairing the roads in all parts of the county, and he says that, while there is plenty of road work to be done near Greenbank, the court later on could secure an automobile truck to carry a force of ten men and material to remote parts of the county. The expense would be less than it is now.

The offer of the trustees to co-operate with the Levy Court presents a feasible solution to the problem of caring for the roads of the county. Mr. Hilles says that the trustees are anxious that the convicts works out of doors.

A lively city campaign is projected by the "Bull Moose" or Original Progressives, and the Republican leaders are alarmed, for they fear that if the "Bull Moosers" poll any considerable number of votes the city will be turned over to the Democrats, as the Progressive strength is drawn almost wholly from the Republicans. Francis I. Du Pont, candidate for Mayor, has been appointed chairman of the committee that is to prepare the platform for the city campaign and municipal problems will be handled without gloves. There may be

[column 3]

of meeting the Progressives on the [?] The campaign will be interesting as disclosing the strength of the Progressives in this city when Colonel Roosevelt is not an issue. ------------------ Some politicians profess to see in the move of the leaders of the "Scales," or National Progressives, today to hold up an action by the street and sewer directors an effort to save the city for the Republicans at the coming city election. Some of the keen ones believe that the refusal of the street and sewer directors to grant the franchise means that the city will be carried by the Democrats, for the Street and Sewer Board is controlled by the Republicans. The Wilmington and Philadelphia company is unpopular because some time ago it withdrew the strip ticket privilege. The National Progressives have been the guardians of the machine Republicans in this state. They saved the county for the Republicans last autmn and hope to show the voters that they are friends of the people. --------------------- Attorney General Wolcott takes exceptions to the allegations of the Women's Home Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church that he is not doing his full duty with regard to prosecutions for the violations of the liquor laws and reminding him that it is his sworn duty to do so. Mr. Wolcott today replied to the resolutions and said that he does not have to be reminded of his oath, for he is not likely to forget it. He assures the women he is not in league with lawbreakers, but that it is his businness to prosecute them as vigorously as he can with the evidence in hand. Mr. Wolcott says that if the liquor laws are being violated in the city it is the duty of the Police Department to attend to that and urges the society to produce any evidence the members may have of violations of the law and urges them to refrain from allowing rumors to condemn him. ---------------------------- When delegates to the Episcopal Sunday school convention in Trinlty Church today attempted to elect a permanent diocese in which the convention is held they found they could not do so because of certain provisions contained in the bylaws. A committee, including the Revs. F. M. Kirkus, L. N. Caley and C. R. Klink, was appointed to revise the bylaws and present them to the next convention for ratification. The convention today adopted a resolution providing for a field secretary who will devote all his time to the Sunday school work and who will receive $2500 a year. ------------------------ Monroe McDaniel, arraigned in the City Court today for failing to support his three small children, whose mother is dead, explained to the Judge that he could not live with his mother-in-law, Mrs. Margaret Edwards, 76 years old, with whom the children make their home, because she talks too much. The Court told the defendant he should take into consideration the woman's extreme age. McDaniel said he was willing to support his children, so he was held in $500 bail for a hearing tomorrow. ------------------------------- Suspecting that the death of Frank Koprowski was due to other than natural causes, Coroner Spring has started a rigid investigation. The young man dropped dead yesterday in the plant of F. Blumenthal & Co., where he was employed. Drs. H. W. Briggs, J. W. Bastian and E. I. Rodgers performed an autopsy and found all the organs of the body normal, but the stomach was sent to Newark for a chemical analysis. Recently Koprowski passed an excellent physical examination in the course of his efforts to be appointed a letter carrier. Coronor Spring would not divulge what information he has to cause him to suspect that Koprowski was poisoned. ------------------------------ Thomas L. Gravell, a pharmacist was painfully burned on the face, hands, neck an arms today by nitric acid. He was carring a bottle of the fluid when it broke and the contents splashed over him. His injuries will not be fatal.

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to democratic progress, sometimes seeming to have as its purpose the apotheosis of proletarianism. Opposition to differentiation of potitical privilege for any reason is as deep-seated, if not so spectacular, as it was in the period of ochlocratic ascendency that followed the achievement of freedom by the American Colonies, the theory of which liberty was largely misinterpreted in France. Russia has partially compromised with this political spirit, which has submerged ancient China and is the crucial issue in Japan.

There is scarcely a spot in the world to which civilization has penetrated that the American idea, generally in a perverted form, has not become the goal, consciously or unconsciously, of the people. That the Socialists and Liberals will eventually win their fight in Begium, if they presently fail, seems to be the logical deduction, for no government in modern times has been able permanently to resist a purely popular demand, and "standpattism," as it is called, has been no more successful in other countries than it has been in America. There is as yet no sign that the flood tide is ready to ebb.

A HALF-CENTURY OF NEGRO FREEDOM. The remarkable sertes of events of in world-wide interest, such as the birth of the Chinese Republic, the downfall of the Turk in Europe, the approaching completion of the Panama Canal, the rapid growth of social democracy at home and abroad, and many other movements of almost equal importance, have accounted in part, probably, for the comparatively little attention thus far shown to the year 1913 as being the semi-centennial of the emancipation of some 4,000,000 of negroes in this Republic. Important as are each and all of the great movements referred to, the PUBLIC LEDGER believes that the American people cannot afford to be indifferent to the claims of the nearly 100,000 colored people in this city of "Brotherly Love," and the more than 10,250,000 persons of negro descent who now reside within the borders of this Republic.

Fifty years ago such noble philan- thropists as William Lloyd Garrison, Wendell Phillips, Horace Mann, Henry Ward Beecher, Phillips Brooks and Bishop Matthew Simpson were pleading the cause of the black man. It required no small degree of courage at that time to espouse so unpopular a cause. But those men believed with Lowell that

"They are slaves who dare not be In the right with two or three."

Every thoughtful student of the last two decades has been brought face to face with startling facts, so many and so appalling at times as to raise the question whether our country has not been undergoing more or less of a complete revulsion of feeling toward [? - fold in paper] scendants. But however strong may have been that ebbing tide, the splendid careers of such men as Booker T. Washington, Doctor Du Bois and scores of other local leaders in Boston, New York and Philadelphia, together with the cheering facts as to the great decrease of illiteracy, and the steady increase of real estate holdings, sound the true note of hope and good cheer. But why this apparent neglect, on the part of both races, to give some fitting expression to this semi-centennial year. Ought not the more highly favored white race to take the initiative in calling attention to the gains and also to the danger signals which confront the colored people today.

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Dr. Roundtree ........2.

knew this (and you can find it out if you are to), I am firmly convinced that you would never have written such stuff as the letter herein referred to. Have you a son? If you have, and he is old enough to understand these things, I would almost bet my hope of heaven that he is having the time of his life trying to keep from obeying an impulse to choke his own daddy. There is alive in many minds in this country the idea (which I am unable to say is shared by me) that a member of the Roman Catholic church ought not to be Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States; that a member of the Roman Catholic church ought not to hold such an important place in the innermost affairs of the nation as the office of Secretary to the President. Do you think the son of Chief Justice White (if he has one) or the son of Secretary Tumulty would approve of the writing of any letter to any person, if such letter purported to command the shutting of the door of hope in the faces of all members of the Roman Catholic church, to the end that they should never hold political office in any place where Roman Catholics were not admired? Pssh[??]---the question needs not answer and especially does it need none from Dr. Roundtree.

Behold here the expressed opinions of white men on the subject of holding office. I quote from the minority report of the Comittee on Elections No. 2, submitted to the House of Representatives August 10, 1912:

"The franchise," the report concludes, "is the most sacred gift of a free government to its people. Next to that franchise, THE MOST PERFECT GIFT OF LIBERTY IS THE RIGHT TO HOLD OFFICE." (Capititalisation is my own.)

Thus the record as written by white men speaks and it speaks for all races and for all time. The right of one sovereign citizen to say to another sovereign citizen "You are not wanted," is limited by the fundamental rights each citizen has in the premises. It goes just that far, and not one whit farther. The Negro citizens of the United States are a part---and a large part ---of the sovereign public in this realm and so long as "truth crushed to earth will rise again," just so long will every man be denied the right under the Constitution to say to his fellow citizen, "You are not to aspire to the higher things of life, because if you do I shall dislike you."

When you send such commications as your letter of the 15th to men high in the affairs of the nation; when you advance your own selfish, niggardly. servile, "hat-in-the-hand", "jim crow" ideas and say "you believe the more thoughtful Negroes throughout the country agree with you in accepting (what you call) the President's (no offices for Negroes) policy as being the proper course to be pursued for the Negro", you perform an overt act toward robbing the young men of the race of their birthright and it marks you as an eneny of your own people, deserving from that peopie, a greater damnation than was visited upon Benedict Arnold.

1 am, with very great sincerity, Your humble servant,

(Signed)

JAMES C. WATERS, JR., 1339 T Street, N. W.

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[152]

April 26, 1913.

Rev. I. W. L. Roundtree, D.D., P. E.. Trenton District, A.M.E. Church, Trenton, N. J.

My dear Dr. Roundtree:

I trust I may attempt to express the very great disgust that overhelms me, and still not [??] offend you.

Your letter to Secretary Tumulty, dated April 15, 1913, as printed in the New York Age of the the 24th inst., is in my humble judgment the meanest, most contemptible thing you ever did. I cannot, to save my life, see why you over thought is wise to [atelly??] yourself by writing such a letter as the thing I refer to--unless, ao the New York Age [supports??], you hoped thereby to curry favor, and eventually to[promote?] in any way (though how, it is hard to understand) yor aspirations to [??] as minister to Haiti. If Secretary Tumulty does not secretly despise you for your traitorous attitude toward your own people, then he is different from other members of the [Tree??] of Robert [Bennett??] whom it has been my pleasure to meet, or know about.

President William H. Taft's "southern policy", announced at the very moment of the beginning of his administration, [???] him to be deemed from one end of the country to the other by all Negroesead and all friends of Negroes except those self-seeking [???] who sought to promote their own interests.

1s it possible that you do not know this? Great scott!!! "The President will [added correction= not] appoint any Negro to office where such appointment will arouse race antagonism." What does that mean? Simply this: that he will appoint a Negro as minister to Liberia, another Negro as minister to Haiti and --that's all. And even then there is reason to believe that [some??] race antagonism will be aroused, for I am told that there are many white men in the Democratic party who are quite willing to accept that $10,000 billet as minister to Haiti, the fact that Haiti is a Negro republic notwithstanding. There is hardly a spot in all this nation where some race antagonism --solely among white people---will not be aroused by the appointment of a Negro to office, and where such a condition does not naturally arise from present day, conditions, it can and will very speedily be made to arise by three who would see in it some profit for themselves. One anti-Negro, [???] head-line article in a yellow journal and the dirty [added correction = work] would be done to a "queen's taste." Of course, no one must mention those portions of the land where Negroes outnumber the whites ten to one. It is all the same---only the whites [??], a Negro in such matters being rated as less than a dog.

Perhaps you wonder why I, an unheard of, (as you might put it) presume to attempt to hand you a "call down" in this case? My answer is ready and it is yours without even the asking. Such [rot?] as you wrote Secertary Tumulty is a stench in the nostrils of most of the older men and ALL the young men of the race, and I am one of the letter. If you could hear the young men talk, day in and day out, and consign men of your ilk to perdition for your palaverings; if you know the bitterness of heart which they feel toward Negroes of your stripe--- men who arm the New York Times and other agencies opposed to a square deal for the Negro with [slabs??] with which to batter us to death---if you

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Personal

[stamp: THE WHITE HOUSE APR 29, 1913 RECEIVED

152

April 26, 1913.

Recvd 4/29/13

The Honorable, The Secretary to the President, White House, Washington, D.C.

Dear Sir:

I[m]have the honor to lay before you the enclosed carbon copy of my letter of even date to Dr. I. W. L. Roundtree. It speaks for itself.

As to whether or not President Wilson will or will not appoint any Negro or Negroes to office is a matter concerning which I have not one word to say. That, of course, is for him to decide and I have no doubt that he will decide it the way it suits him to decide it. But when a member of the Negro race writes to you and tells you that right thinking Negroes agree that it is right to withhold from Negroes a thing which men of all nations celebrate as a sacred gift of freedom, then I feel it is time to let you know that such Negroes do not represent the best and the innermost thought of the Negro race on the subject herein referred to.,

Jean Finot, the distinguished French savant, has given to the world in his "Race Prejudice" the most notable work extant on that terrible subject. In that masterpiece he shows that race prejudice is above all things unreasoning. That being true, it ill behooves a member of a race which notoriously suffers from the injustice of race prejudice to strike a truce with [Molesh?] by admitting that a state of mind which is shown to be devoid of every vestige of reasonableness, is the right state of mind to apply in formulating a policy toward upwards of ten million human beings.

I denonce I. W. L. Roundtree (may his tribe decrease) for the miserable letter he wrote you under date of the 15th inst., and I ask that these papers be filed as a solemn (if also impotent) protest against the destructive doctrine laid down by him. If he does not realise what his letter means then he is an idiot; if he does realise it, then he is a caitiff.

Very respectfully, Your most humble servant, James C. Waters, Jr.. 1339 T Street, N. W.

1 enclosure.

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