Woodrow Wilson Papers Microfilm Reels

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Microfilm Reel 229, File 152, "African Americans"

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HUDSPETH, Hon. Rob, S., Jersey City, N. J.

May 15. 1913.

Discusses the present status of the Jury Reform Bill; urges necessity for compronise.

Refers to a previous letter to the "colored question and expresses the belief that the appointments recommended at that time could be highly satisfactory. Desires to secure as much recognition as poesible for Jerseymen; mentions Joseph [Filoromo?] who wishes to be made Asst. to the Comissioner of Immigration at Ellis Island, Walter J. Wolski, an applicant for position in the Custom House or Internal Revenue Dept. at New York, Patrick Norton’s son who wishes a similar position to that sought by Wolski, Harry Davis, Peter James, Joseph E. Bernstein, Cornelius Ford, a candidate for Public Printer. Hopes that Frank J. McAdams, of Canden, can be given a position in the Customs or Internal Revenue Dept.

See - Hudspeth

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WASHINGTON

SHINGTON, D.C., SATURDAY, MAY 3, 1913

[image: Alexander Walters]

BISHOP ALEXANDER WALTERS Given up Hope 83469

the Negro Democrats who up to the present time have been given the cold shoulder by the Wilson administration. But The Bee predicted this many months ago.

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IF IT'S NEWS, IT'S THE BEE, FOR THE BEE IS A NEWSPAPER

VOL. XXXIII,NO 47

[Column 1] WOODROW WILSON

EDITOR CHASE MAKES A PLEA FOR THE NEGRO. PRESIDENT NO COMMITTEE

Is There Any Hope for the Colored American? Does the Action of the Democratic Administration Hold Out Any Hope for the Negro? Negro Democrats Despondent—The Editor's Letters to President-Elect and President Wilson.

Long before the election of President Woodrow Wilson, alleged Negro Democrats and so-called independent Negro Republicans had great hopes of receiving recognition from the Democratic party and the Democratic administration in the event of the success of the Democratic party at the polls last November.

Long before the election colored independents and alleged Negro Democrats picked out the offices they wanted. Every Negro Democrat of any prominence had selected places held by Negro Republicans and many of these declared that they would succeed Negro Republicans. Candidates had their eyes planted upon some of the choice plums that were held by Negro Republicans, and many of them declared Mr. Wilson would not only appoint Negro Democrats to places held by Negro Republicans, but the President intended to give Negro Democrats two or three more additional places. Have their hopes and fond expectations been realized? Has Mr. Wilson held out any hope to the 30 per cent of the alleged Negro vote that Rev. Waldren declared that he secured for the Democratic President? Who succeeded W. H. Lewis, the Assistant Attorney General? A white Democrat. Who succeeded General Robert Smalls, the hero of the Civil War? A white Democrat. Who has been nominated to succeed Auditor Ralph W. Tyler, one of the greatest Negro journalists of the age, and the most efficient Auditor who has ever held the office? A white Democrat. Who will succeed [?] er presidential places held ?] extent.

[Column 2] ceived except the one sent by Secretary Tumulty, March 29th, sometime after the inauguration of Mr. Wilson, the following letter was sent to President Wilson:

After Inauguration.

Washington, D. C., March 29th, 1913.

Hon. Woodrow Wilson, The White House, Washington, D. C.

Dear Mr. President:

We wrote you some weeks before your inauguration asking if members of the race in whose interest this newspaper is published might be benefited by your reputed policy to recognize merit and efficiency. Mr. Tumulty replied that our letter would be brought to your attention. Further than this, we have heard nothing. Is it true, Mr. President, that color is to be the primary cause for the displacement of Negroes from office no matter how efficient, and that color will be the effectual bar to appointment to office of men whom God ceated with a darker skin than yours? There appears to be a generally accepted belief prompted by statements from those closest to you that Negro officeholders will be quickly displaced, and that the door of hope is to be closed to the race by your administration. This newspaper asks notlng at your hands for its editor and proprietor, but we do ask something for our race—simply fair consideration at your hands. We ask this because we are American citizens taxed the same rate as white citizens, and amendable to the same laws which govern the whites. We were led to believe that your high Christian character would assure us equity. We hope, Mr. President, you will give the race substantial encouragement rather than discouragement. There are ten millions of us to help make the country better. Can you give my race reason to hope, and, hoping fair representation under your administration? We trust you will deal equitably with the ten million Negroes.

Respectfully, THE WASHINGTON BEE, W. Calvin Chase, Editor and Proprietor.

Mr. Tumulty thought enough of the editor's title to acknowledge it, hence he sent the following answer to the foregoing:

THE WHITE HOUSE Washington

March 31, 1913,

My Dear Sir: Permit me to [?]

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STILL LETTING OUT NEGRO OFFICEHOLDERS

Democratic Administration Very Busy last Week—Ralgh W. Tyler and Joseph Lee Removed— White Men Replace Them.

Special to THE NEW YORK AGE.

WASHINGTON, D. C, April 30.—Pres. ident Wilson and his cabinet broke their own record last week for removing Negroes from office Both Hon. Joseph Lee of Florida, and Hon. Ralph W Tyler, the Auditor for the Navy Department, were ousted. In each case white man was designated to take the place vacated. Thus far there seems to be no intention whatever of the President and his cabinet to appoint colored men to fill positions formerly held Negroes under the Republican administration.

The gratitude of the Democratic pa toward the Negro who voted the Democratic ticket is being exhibited now nearly every day in the nations capitol in the foregoing manner.

News reaches Washington from Atlanta that even the Negro messengers who hitherto delivered the special delivery letters and packages in the city of Atlanta are to be replaced by white messengers.

It is said that Messrs. Carr and Morton of the United Colored Democracy of New York, visited President Wilson last week and urged the anmointment of a New Yorker to the Liberian post. made vacant by the resignation of Fred R. Moore. Rumor has it that President Wilson informed his visitors that he did not intend to appoint any one to a diplomatic position who was an active applicant. 83467

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2

be recognized by the Wilson administration. They aim to be in time gathering up ammunition for the next Congressional election. This they will try to use in winning back the many thousand colored votes that was cast for the democratic success in 1912. They are very glad that none of us colored democrats have been given anything. But to back up the assersions I made during the campaign I sincerely hope you and our good President will surprise them ere long. Enclosed please find clipping from the Charlette (A. C.) Observer written by me during the last campaign. (Will thank you to read it and kindly return the same to me). I am, Your obedient servant. J C. Cunningham, 26 Degrees St. [N.W?]

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City, May 7, 1913.

[stamp] THE WHITE HOUSE MAY 8 1913 RECEIVED

[stamp ] C.T.H. MAY 8 1913 ACK'D

152

Hon. J. P. Tumulty Secretary to the President

My dear Mr. Secretary:-

I hope you will pardon me for interrupting you just a little bit at this time. But I wish to send you a clipping from last week's issue of the Washington Bee, and The New York Age. These papers did all they could during the last campaign to keep the colored vote in line for the republicans. They continue to impress it in the minds of the colored brother that the democrats were his enemies and wouldn't recognize them if elected. Now they are saying they predicted that the colored Democrats would be given the cold shoulder and wouldn't 83465

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May 6/13.

J.P.T.-#12

P.S. I understand application has been made by William A. Tarby, of Everett, Mass., who has for over eighteen years been employed in the Boston Custom House, to be transferred from the office of Assistant Weigher and Acting Inspector to that of Inspector. Tarby is a Democrat and strongly supported President Wilson in the last campaign. Mr. Trotter, and other colored men of influence are behind Mr. Tarby, seeking this advancement. Please consider this as a request to accompany the foregoing list.

R. S. Hudspeth

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R.S.H.

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J.P.T.-#2 May 21, 1913

Headquarters, and is a man of considerable influence in the East amongst the colored race.

I would very much like to see his suggestions complied with as far as possible.

Very sincerely yours, R. S. Hudspeth

R.S.H.

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425 Schiller Ave. Trenton, N. J. May 23, 1913.

Hon. Joseph P. Tumulty. Executive Department.

[stamp] ACK'D MAY 26 1913 W.F.J.

Hon. Joseph P. Tumulty, Executive Department Washington, D. C.

My dear Mr. Tumulty:—

I have been for some time answering letters of inquiry from various portions of the country from leading colored men, concerning President Woodrow Wilson as to his fairness toward the negro. Many of the letters bear the brand of an honest inquiry. These I have answered from my knowledge, of our good President, and stated as clearly as I could, that the negroes need not have any apprehension or fear that justice would not be given them in any department of the government that come under the control of the President.I have pointed out to them that there have been from time to time, things occurred in some of the states against the negro that no former President could control and that some of them are likely to occur under the present administration, but they are matters to be adjusted by the states in which they occur.

1 am just from New York where I had a talk with Fred Maore the Editor of the New York Age - I told him that the President was fair and that he should hold upon criticising the administration.

I attended the A. M. E. Conference in Delaware last week and the New York this week and the New Jersey some two weeks ago. In these conferences I advised patience and support of the administration. I want my race to see the President from the angle of Justice and if I can help along this line I intend to do so. You may say to the President that I am doing all in my power to have the colored people to stand by his administration from his great record and patritism, and that they have a friend in him who is intensely interested in their uplift to a standard of good citizenship. I write you this letter because I know that you appreciate any service that I may be able to render the administration

Very truly yours. T. W. [?]

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[stamp] THE WHITE HOUSE MAY 31 1913 RECEIVED

[stamp] ACK'D MAY 31, 1913 C.T.H.

Hon. Joseph P. Tumulty Secretary to the President, Washington, D.C.

Dear Tumulty:-

I am handing you some clippings regarding colored appointments. The Republican branch of our colored friends are hanmering away at Bishop Walters. Strife is being stirred up all over the country amongst the colored people, based uron the criticism of those who supported the democratic ticket, and their failure to secure recognition.

I trust the President will see his way clear to allot at least as much patronage to the colored race, who espoused our cause, as was given colored resublicans by the Republican Party.

1 an,

Very truly yours, R. S. Hudspeth

R.S.H.

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