Warren, Mercy Otis,1728-1814. Plays and poetry :manuscript, [17--]. MS Am 1354.1. Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.

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Summary:

Plays and poems, chiefly satires, in support of American independence and patriotic causes.

Pages

Front cover (seq. 1)
Blank Page

Front cover (seq. 1)

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Last edit almost 4 years ago by KRich
Inside front cover (seq. 2)
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Inside front cover (seq. 2)

Harvard College Library

From

Estate of Prof. H. W. Torrey through Prof. W. W. Goodwin.

26 June, 1896

Last edit almost 4 years ago by austin2
Letter (seq. 3)
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Letter (seq. 3)

Winslow Warren

Attorney and Counsellor at Law

39 Court Street

Boston, Mass., April 6, 1897

Justin Winsor, {Esquire}

Harvard College Library

Cambridge, Mass.

Dear Sir:

Yours of March 20, received upon my return from vacation. I rather think the MS. book which you refer to as coming from {Professor} Torrey's estate went to the College by accident, as we never have seen it and I am bound to say that we should not have passed it over to the College, probably, if we had. I rather think (but as you see it is guess work) that the MSS. were in the handwriting of James Warren, Jr., Mrs. Warren's son, as he was her amanuensis in almost all the manuscript books. Miss Brown took her names from the MSS., in Mrs. Warren's handwriting, in my possession. I should like sometime to see the book and I could tell very easily whether it was Mrs. Warren's handwriting.

I am,

Very truly yours,

Winslow Warren

Last edit about 3 years ago by blackletterkate
p. 1 (seq. 4)
Complete

p. 1 (seq. 4)

1

At a period when America stood trembling for her illegible invaded liberty, when the refined acts of certain interested politicians had spread the tales of falsehood, untill the people, as usual, were de ceived in character, and bullied into a supineness which frequently sinks beneath the weight of oppression and there was danger they would remain long insensible either of their rights, or power of resistance:-- several Dramatic sketches were offered the public, with a design to strip the vizard from the crafty.

The writer recollecting a maxim of the Cardinal de Pietz,-- that "a song will sometimes more forcibly impress the ne "cessary political operations, than the most solid arguments, or "the most judicious reasonings." Advertized March one thousand seven hundred and seventy two, to be exhibited for the entertainment of the public, at the grand parade in upper Ser via, the Adulateur; a theatrical performance of three acts. As a specimen of the work, we have extracted the following passages.

Dramatis Personæ

Rapatio, Bashaw of Servia --------------------------- Governor Hutchinson

Limpit, married to Rapatio's sister in law ------ Andrew Oliver

Lord Chief Justice Hazlerod ------------------------- Peter Oliver

Dupe, Secretary of State ------------------------------ Thomas Flucker

Gripeall, Captain Bashaw ----------------------------- Admiral Montague

Brutus, a Senator ----------------------------------------- James Otis Junior

Meagre, brother to Rapatio ---------------------------- Foster Hutchinson

Pimps, Parasites, Sycophants, Dragoons, Waiters, &c. &c. &c.

Last edit about 3 years ago by blackletterkate
p. 2 (seq. 5)
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p. 2 (seq. 5)

2

Act first Scene first

Rapatio's house enter Rapatio solus

Oh! fortunate -- --

Could I have thought my stars would be so kind As thus to bring my deep laid schemes to bear!

I from my youth, ambitions path have trod Sucked the contagion from my mothers breast, The early taint has rankled in my veins And lust of power-- is still my darling lust. Despotic rule my first,-- my sovereign wish.

Yet to succeed beyond my sanguine hope To quench the glorious flame,-- the ardent love Of liberty,-- in Servia's freeborn sons,-- Destroy their boasted rights,-- and make them slaves, To ride in triumph o'er my native land, And revel on its spoils! -- I dare not hope.--

But hark! its groans, – her dying pangs The struggles of fair freedom, 'tis I hear. – And I the guilty cause. I shudder at the thought; Why this confusion? – The phantom conscience To whom I've bid adieu, can she return? Oh let me fly!

I dare not meet my naked heart alone: I'll haste for comfort to the busy scenes Where fawning courtiers-- creatures of my own With adulating tongues-- 'midst gaping crowds, Shall strive to paint me fair. And 'tis a lucky day indeed for me-- The Divan meets-- and Hazlerod presides.

'Tis true, in rhetoric he dont excel Demosthenes or Cicero of old;-- But what of that,-- his gratitude to me, Will animate each period of applause.

I from a scribbling, superficial dabbler, A vain pretender to each learned science, A Poet, Preacher, Conjurer and Quack, Reared the obsequious trifler to my purpose, Robed him in scarlet,-- dignified the man. An Hecatomb of incense is my due. How grateful to my ear his flat'ring strains! His fulsome requiems, sooth my soul to peace, Who else would place in such a sacred seat Credulity inwove with the extremes Of servile, weak, implacable and proud?

Last edit about 3 years ago by blackletterkate
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