V. 4 No. 1 - The Slater News

ReadAboutContentsHelp

Pages

gcls_SN_027a
Needs Review

gcls_SN_027a

PERFECTION IN TEXTILES--A SLATER FAMILY TRADITION SINCE 1790

[Graphic of Old Slater Mill] [Graphic of Slater Mill] Old Slater Mill Slater Mill PAWTUCKET, R.I. SLATER, SO. CAROLINA EST. 1790 1943 THE SLATER NEWS Vol. 4 Slater, S.C., January 17, 1946 No. 1

[Column 1]

Christmas Play Presented To Slater Audience

The annual Christmas play was presented at Slater Hall on Thursday evening, December 20, at 8 p.m. A large crowd was present for this occasion, as the hall was filled to capacity.

This year the play was sponsored by the three churches of Slater, so a preliminary religious service was held just before the play was presented. This program began with the audience standing and singing the Doxology. The invocation was pronounced by the Reverend Thomas L. Bryson, pastor of the Slater Methodist Church. A hymn, "O Come, All Ye Faithful," was sung by the audience after which the Reverend J. M. Dean, pastor of the Slater Church of God, read the Scripture Lesson taken from the Book of Isaiah. Announcements were made by the Reverend Clyde M. Johnson, pastor of the Slater Baptist Church, after which the audience sang, "O, Little Town of Bethlehem."

Following this preliminary service, the play "The White Christmas," by Walter Ben Hare, was presented. Those taking part and the characters they portrayed were: Prologue, Elizabeth Ammons; Mary, Elizabeth Ballenger; Joseph, Robert H. Atkinson; Simeon, R. P. Canham; Timothy, Raymond Johnson; Isaac, C. C. Compton; Anna, Faye Dean; Thomas, Jesse White, Jr.; Ruth, Sarah Jo Johnson; Deborah, Ruby McGill; Rachel, Betty McMullan; Priscilla, Ophelia Riley; Melchoir, Claude Guest; Gaspar, C. G. Hyer; and Baltasar, E. A. McGill. (Con't on page 3, col. 1)

[Photo in columns 1 and 2] Each employee of the Slater Manufacturing Co., Inc. receives a Christmas present from the Company in the form of a check. Overseers deliver these checks to their employees at the Christmas Program at Slater Hall. Here Overseer W. M. Cole is presenting checks to several of his employees.

[Column 2] [Photo in columns 2, 3, and 4] A part of the crowd at Slater Hall singing Christmas carols at the annual Christmas Program sponsored by the Slater Manufacturing Co. Inc. for its employees. This program is an annual affair at Slater, being held on the day the mill closes down for the Christmas holidays.

CIVIC CLUB HOLDS ANNUAL BANQUET

The Civic Club held its annual Christmas banquet at Hotel Greenville Monday night, December 17.

At the conclusion of a bountiful turkey dinner, the club members exchanged Christmas gift. Mrs. Eithel Gosnell, president of the club, played the part of Santa Claus, and distributed the gifts which had been placed under a brilliantly lighted Christmas tree.

Those attending the banquet were: Mesdames J. W. Smith, Harold Smith, Allen Suttle, Clint Hawkins, Mary White, Eithel Gosnell, Louise Chandler, Elinor Horton, B. B. Brown, (Con't. on page 2, col. 5)

[Column 3]

Yuletide Rites At Slater Hall

The annual Christmas program, sponsored by Slater Manufacturing Co., Inc., for employees and their families was held at Slater Hall on Saturday morning, December 22.

A beautiful Christmas tree, resplendent with multi-colored lights, ornaments and tinsel decked the stage. Early on the morning of the program, Christmas carols were played over the loud speaker so that they could be heard throughout the village. The carols continued as the people assembled.

The program was presided over by Mr. J. A. White, Plant Manager. In his remarks, Mr. White, speaking in behalf of both Commander Slater and himself, thanked the people for their splendid work and cooperation of the past year, and asked for a continuation of this fine spirit during the coming year. He also mentioned our men and women in service, giving special mention to those who had made the supreme sacrifice3.

Mr. White then called on Rev. Clyde M. Johnson, pastor of the Slater Baptist Church, Rev. J. M. Dean, pastor of the Slater Church of God, and Rev. T. L. Bryson, pastor of the Slater Methodist Church. Each of these ministers spoke briefly, after which Mr. White presented Mr. and Mrs. DuPre Rhame of Greenville. Mr. Rhame, accompanied at the piano by Mrs. Rhame, sang two solos, after which he led the audience in the singing of a number of Christmas carols. (Con't. on page 2, col. 5)

[Column 4]

ACTORS ARE DINED AT DAVE STANSELL'S

The members of the cast of the Christmas play were entertained at Dave Stansell's on Thursday, January 3rd. In addition to the cast, the committees from the churches were also invited and were present.

There was no set program, however, various members gave short, impromptu talks. Among those speaking were Messrs. F. A. Cook, R. P. Canham, C. G. Hyer, R. W. Summey, Raymond Johnson, the Reverend Clyde M. Johnson and the Reverend J. M. Dean. Several of the ladies present also delivered short talks. Among these were Mrs. Ruby McGill, Mrs. J. M. (Con't. on page 2, col. 4)

[Photo in columns 4 and 5] A bag of fruit, containing oranges, apples, tangerines, nuts, raisins, and candy, is given to children of employees under 18 years of age. Here the bags are being delivered to the employees for their children by members of the office force at the Christmas Program at Slater Hall.

[Column 5]

Union Services Conducted Here Fifth Sunday

The Reverend T. L. Bryson, Pastor of the Slater Methodist Church, delivered the sermon at the union service of the Slater churches held at the Slater Church of God on Sunday evening, December 30th at 7:00 o'clock.

Rev. Bryson based his remarks on the story of the talents and delivered a most inspiring and informational talk.

The Reverend J. M. Dean, Pastor of the slater Church of God, was in charge of the program. The Reverend Clyde M. Johnson, Pastor of the Slater Baptist Church, pronounced the invocation. A choir composed of the singers from the three churches was present and delivered beautiful music for the occasion. At this service, Messrs. J. A. Lybrand, Jr., J. A. White, Robet H. Atkinson and W. Earle Reid as a committee representing the Slater Manufacturing Company, Inc., presented $5,000 bonds to the pastor of each of the churches as a gift from the Company.

Mr. Lybrand made a short statement bringing greetings from the officials of the company and expressing appreciation for the fine spirit of cooperation which had always existed at Slater. It was further stated that the officials were vitally interested in the religious life of the community and wanted to see that the churches were provided for in a manner which would enable everyone to worship in surroundings of dignity, beauty and comfort. It was with this thought in mind that a donation was being made to each congregation to assist with any improvements or addi(Con't. on page 2, col. 4)

Last edit 13 days ago by Bev D.
gcls_SN_027b
Complete

gcls_SN_027b

Page Four THE SLATER NEWS January 17, 1946

[Column 1]

Former Pastor Speaks At Church

"Men in the combat area worshipped God in every conceivable kind of place," said Chaplain Charles T. Thompson as he spoke at the Slater Baptist Church Sunday night, January 6. On this occasion, Captain Thompson said that, as a member and former pastor of the church just mentioned, he wished to consider his message as an account of his stewardship during his absence.

Acordingly, he told many of his experiences as a combat chaplain, emphasizing the fact that the men worshipped God just where they were. In this connection, the speaker told of services held in such places as fox holes, cow stalls, buildings of all kinds, and even in fields and forests. Often the men stood in snow and rain to have a service.

As a combat chaplain with troops directly on t he front battle line, Captain Thompson spoke from a wealth of experiences. He underwent all of the dangers and hazards common tot he front line soldier, and lived with the men to whom he ministered. Since he was "one of them," he knows from actual experience that these men worshipped Gode just as they were, and wherever they were.

Chaplain Thompson expressed his appreciation to God for his safe return home, and thanked those who had remembered him with their prayers and letters while he was away.

Although Captain Thompson has not yet been discharged, we are happy that he is now on furlough and during this leave has visited Slater several times.

Mrs. Thompson, who is the former Miss Elizabeth Tapp, of Greer, and little daughter, Ann, remained in Slater most of the time while Chaplain Thompson was overseas. However, they joined him in Durham, N.C., shortly after his return from Europe. The people of Slater welcome both Mrs. Thompson and Ann along with Chaplain Thompson, and rejoice with the three of them that they are together again. _____

NEWSPAPER NEEDS GOOD REPORTING

When you receive The Slater News every two weeks you like to take it home and read it. Of course you do! For, like the newspaper you read daily, your company publication contains news of especial interest to you and very often evey more so than your daily newspaper, for your company publication contains information about the product you're making and intimate items and stories concerning the people you work with and meet every day. You seee, it's really a personal newspaper designed especially to inform you as to what is going on in the plant and to keep you in close touch with the doings of your fellow workers.

In order that your company publication may function properly, it has an editor and a staff just like any large newspaper

[Column 2]

VARIABLE WEATHER HOLDS LIMELIGHT

The weather at Slater is usually mild and seldom causes any great deal of comment by anyone for it is, as a generla rule, taken as a matter of course. However, the weather for the past month has leaped into the limelight for during the past month, it has certainly "acted up."

To begin with, it snowed three times before Christmas and on Sunday before Christmas the last of these snows appeared. The next day was Christmas Eve and on this day, it sleeted and rained with the rain freezing. It can be truly said that Slaterites enjoyed a "White Christmas" for ice, snow and sleet greeted the kiddies when they arose on Christmas morning to find out what Santa Claus had brought them.

To their elders, it meant a great many discomforts for the ice had caused many trees to break and, also, power and telephone lines to snap, and thus the Village of Slater was literally cut off from the rest of the world. The ice and snow melted Christmas day and soon So, you see,the ice and snow were gone, but it was several days before power could be restored and much longer before all of the telephone lines were definitely cleared up.

Then the weather again made a shift and this itme instead of being cold and snowy, it had changed to warm and humid. According to reports from the local Weather Bureau in Greenville, approximately four inches of rain fell in about a two-day period and, as a result, streams ran over their banks and water stood in a body in the rear of the mill coming up almost to the Boiler Room and Warehouse.

We believe this is going from one extreme to the other, but, no doubt, the weather will soon get back on schedule and cease to be a topic of primary importance. _____

or magazine. The editor is responsible for the publishing and produciton of your publication and writes much of the content. The reporters send in personal items, social notes, news of births, engagements, marriages and deaths from various departments. These items are duly printed because they concern the everyday life of your fellow workers which you, as a member of this organization, are naturally interested in.

So, you see, your company publication operates along the same lines as that of your daily newspaper. The only real difference being that your publication covers the activities of one entire business organization, while a newspaper covers the activities of the world at large.

A publication is only as good as its staff. You, as a regular recipient of your company publication, are a member of our staff. We depend on you to keep us informed as to what goes on in your department because, as an active member of your department, you are in a position to gather news and personal items which can be easily overlooked by even the

[Column 3]

Photo in columns 3, 4, and 5] Each year Mr. J. A. White, Plant Manager, gives a dinner for the supervisors and key men of the plant at Christmas time. In this picture can be seen about 200 men rapidly doing away with catfish, fried chicken, and the other good things to be found on the menu at Dave Stansell's famous eating place.

IT CAN BE DONE

The man who says, "It can't be done!" Although he knows it can, Is often lazy in his ways And rude to fellow men. It can be done, no matter what, The bulwark in the way. And he who says, "I can! and tries Starts on the task, today!

The man who says, "It can't be done!" Will very often find; That in this world of men who can He's always left behind. For he who diligently strives To seek a way to do Will find the task half finished While the problem still isnew!

The man who says, "It can't be done!" Finds life a friendless thing; The man who says, "It can be done!" Is happy as a king. He's licked before he makes a start, The man who will not try, But he who says, "It can be done!" Will sure as heck get by! --By Russell Doyle _____

most conscientious reporter.

Make it your business to have your own publication just as you want it! By this we mean that you should take a personal interest in your company publication by sending in any news of interest you may chance to come across. By doing this, you'll be a valuable supplement to our regular staff and we'll be able to cover the goings on in this organization much more completely.

Did we hear you say, "But I'm not a reporter!" You're wrong there! There're news items all around you waiting to be uncovered. Everyone of your fellow employees is potential news copy. Take a look around you. That fellow next to you has birthdays, wedding anniversaries, and perhaps children going to school, all of which are substantil news items. The same goes for everybody else in your department. There's some kind of story in every employee you come in contact with, and we'll be glad to print them if you'll submit

[Column 4] Chaplain Heard By Slaterites

Chaplain Charles T. Thompson, of the Army of the United States and a former pastor of the Slater Baptist Church, was the principal speaker at the dinner given by J. A. White, Plant Manager, to the supervisors and key men at Dave Stansell's on December 22.

The Chaplain told of his experiences with the soldiers in the famous Battle of the Bulge and how at first our forces had to give ground, but as soon as the German Army was stopped in this engagement they began to advance and did until the Germans finally surrendered.

He told of the services held in fox holes and others held under heavy shell fire. He also explained how the chaplains were able to counsel with the men and of the many thyings he could do for the soldiers which greatly aided their personal life and affairs.

Everyone enjoyed the Chaplain's address and were glad to hear and know that our soldiers were able to have the men of the Chaplains' Corps with them as they faced the dangers and hardships of the battlefield.

Several men also contributed short talks. Among these were: Frank A. Cook. R. P. Alexander, C. G. Hyer, and R. P. Canham. Mr. White, in his remarks, thanked all present for their fine work of the past year and asked their continued support in 1946.

About 200 men enjoyed the affair. After a hearty dinner and the various talks the occasion came to a close. _____

them to us. And don't worry about composition and spelling. That's our job. You just send in the bare facts of the story and we'll be only too glad to edit and rewrite it for you.

Take a real interest in your company publicaiton. If it is interesting to read now, think of how much more interesting it will be if your own items appear in it. You'll feel the glow of literary accomplishment and we, in turn, will be grateful for the news and information you suipply.

That's the story! We want

[Column 5]

JOHNSON PREACHES ON WORLD PROB LEMS

In his New Year's message to the congregation of the cal Baptist Church, Rev. Clyde M. Johnson stressed nine points as attributes of the kind of a Saviour the world needs.

He said--"We (the world) needs a Saviour who:

1. Can speak with authority about God and Heaven. 2. "Loves the world with a measureless love. 3. "Will blot out forever our sins and failures. 4. "Can give us a new heart which will make sin hateful and make right natural. 5. "Can inspire us to conquer evil. 6. "Will give us an ideal, a living example, a goal toward which to move. 7. "Is able to bestow upon His ollowers the inspiration and guidance of the Holy Spirit. 8. "Is a human Saviour and is able to sympathize with humanity's griefs and difficulties. 9. "Is Divine, omnipresent, omnipotent, and omniscient."

Rev. Johnson has resigned his pastorate at Slater and goes to Pelzer in January to take up work there. _____ It is ridiculous for any man to criticize the works of another if he has not distinguished himself by his own performances.--Addison. _____ If you confer a benefit, never remember it. If you receive one, never forget it.--Chilon. _____ A man can't very well make for himself a place in the sun if he keeps continually taking refuge under the family tree.--Anonymous. _____ The Slater News to be the very best we can make it, and we're depending on you to try your hand at reporting the doings of your department and the people in it. Honest, you'll find it's a lot of fun being a reporter, and it will be a source of continual satisfaction to you to know that your department is well represented in The Slater News regularly. Get that pencil sharpened and let's go!

Last edit over 1 year ago by aglasscottage
gcls_SN_027c
Needs Review

gcls_SN_027c

Page Two THE SLATER NEWS January 17, 1946

[Column 1] The Slater News

Published Every Two Weeks

By

Slater Manufactiong Co., Inc.

Established 1790

In The Interest of Its Employees.

[Images of two rounded triangular logos. One bears the initials NCIE over a book with two crossed feather quills. The other is made of a larger tirangle with the words EDITORIAL, PRODUCTION, and APPEARANCE around the edges, while a smaller interior triangle reads SAIE.]

STAFF

Robert H. Atkinson....... Editor

Cecial Sprights....... Asst Editor

REPORTERS

Weave Room: Ernestine McCall, Nellie Barnette, Walker Reid, Gladys Cox, Rosalee Cox, Sara C. Chitwood, Dovie Faust, Louise Bagwell, and Margaret Johnson.

Preparation Dept.: Jessie Vassey, Dorothy Hawkins, Julia Brown, Mildred Mull, Mary Wallace, Lucille Tate, Ruby Drury, Nellie Ruth Payne, Stanley Hawkins, Irene Cox.

Cloth Room: Opal W. Smith.

Community: Mrs. Raymond Johnson, W. Earle Reid, Ruby P. Reid, Doris F. Atkinson.

EDITORALS

Happy New Year!

For the first time in years the greeting of "Happy New Year!" has the true ring of sincerity. 1946 will be a year of peace and world progress. It will be the year of transition to normal living for war weary veterans and for the soldiers of production who worked long, weary hours to keep supplies rolling to our victorious armies. Yes, this grand new year of 1946 holds special significance for all of us, and it is our duty to lead our personal effort toward making it the marvelous new year we want it to be.

If you haven't completed your new year resolutions as yet, here are few that will help you do your part to make this world a better place to live in:

1. Be tolerant of all races and creeds.

2. Have faith in your fellow man.

3. Take a strong personal interest in your job.

4. Make courtesy a part of your everyday life.

5. Be considerate of the feelings of others.

6. Give your best effort to every undertaking.

Six simple resolutions, but they can change your whole outlook on life and make this world of ours a grand place in which to dwell!

Let's show that we appreciate a new year free from the shackles of war by doing all in our power to make it glorious year for men of all races and creeds.

Welcome Home!

It's good to see you former G. I . Joes and G. I. Janes back on the job. We've missed you but we knew that your place in the Armed Services was of prime importance, during the

[continued bottom of Column 2] long war years, and we resigned ourselves to keeping the home fires buring for you and buying war bonds to get you home sooner.

It has been a long war and we had no idea when we'd see you again when you left. But we've followed your career through the newspaper accounts of the war and we've felt a group sense of relief when your name didn't appear on the casualty lists. Now the war years seem like a nightmare because here you are back on the job and mingling again with your old friends and acquaintances. And, gosh, it sure is is swell to have you back with us again!

It's needless to say that we all feel indebted to you, and rightfully so! You've experienced the living hell of war. You've made history. You've defeated a relentless foe. And, most of all, you've shown the world that America isn't to be trifled with and that her sons and daughters are quick to go to her defense in time of need!

So - welcome home. We're sure glad to have you back with us and we want you to know it.

[Top of Column 2] SLATER

DAY BY DAY

WHEN THE LIGHTS WENT OUT:

Monday, Christmas Eve, 1945 was a raw, bitter day unfit for man or beast to be abroad.

All day long rain and snow had made slush on the streets and sidewalks, and by nightfall the rain had turned to sleet that stuck to and weighted down wires and trees. Ice stuck to windshields and motorists slid in ditches.

Telephone and electic poles and wires snapped and the lights of our village flickered and went out.

Adventuresome folk who had braved the cold and sleet to attend the regular Monday night picture show groped their way out of the darkened building after having seen only part of the picture.

And that night Santa Claus made his visits in the dark.

Until the following Friday, at lamp lighting time, all or part of our village was without electricity.

Lovers went a-wooing through slippery streets with only the beam of a flashlight to guide them.

Housewives who usually cooked on electric stoves prepared company Christmas dinner on tiny laundry heaters.

Our postmistress dispensed stamps by the light of a kerosene lamp, and she kept warm by a little oil heater.

Our doctor delivered a baby by the light from lanterns and candles.

Radios were silent and children played with their Christmas toys and games by firelight, just as their grandparents used to do.

And one youngster, waxing poetic, excplaimed: "King Winter hath laid his icy hand all over our fair land. Methinks the furnace hath gone out!"

[Column 3] Cloth Room Chatter

Mr. and Mrs. Jim Hester and family had dinner Monday with Mrs. Hester's mother, Mrs. A. S. Hammett, of Travelers Rest. The family was happy to have Mrs. Hester's brother, Charles, home from the Navy for the Christmas holidays.

Miss Ruth Goldsmith was the guest of Miss Elizabeth Edwards and relatives during the holidays.

Mr. and Mrs. L. D. Holt, of Clover, Va., recently visited Mrs. Holt's parents and family, Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Talley.

Mrs. Beulah Stroud was happy to have all her children spend Christmas day with her. A delicious dinner of turkey with all the trimmings was enjoyed by all.

Cpl. Ralph Goldsmith has returned to Camp Carson, Colo., after spending a 10 day furlough with his wife, Mrs. Jeanette Guest Goldsmith, and other relatives.

Mr. Carl Hill, of Stanton, Va., spent the holidays with his sister, Mrs. Lucille Sharp.

Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Smith, Jr., of Danville, Va., spent Christmas day with Mr. John Farthing and family.

James Lewis Batson, brother of Mildred Coleman, has received his discharge from the armed forces after serving 49 months. He served 23 months in the European theater.

Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Shirley and family had Sunday dinner with Mr. Shirley's mother, Mrs. Nannie Shirley, of Greenville, and Christmas day they enjoyed a nice dinner with Mrs. Shirley's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jim Stroud, of Marietta.

Mr. and Mrs. Jim Poole, and little Dan, of Marietta, visited Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Edwards, of Travelers Rest, last Sunday.

Mr. and Mrs. Ed Pace had as their guest last week, Mrs. Pace's brother, Tyson Shewbert, from Ware Shoals, who has recently been discharged from the Navy.

Mrs. Agnes Bagwell visited her husband in Columbia Sunday.

Mr. and Mrs. T. C. Veal and family spent the holidays with Mrs. Veal's mother, Mrs. Tom Willis, of Shelby, N.C.

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Edwards visited Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Campbell, of Greer, for the Christmas holidays.

The Cloth Room is glad to have Mrs. Lois Ward, who has come to work as a grader in the department. We hope she will enjoy her work here.

It's good to see Ray Smith back in the Cloth Room after three years in the Army. He was overseas two years and served with the Third Army in England, France, Belgium, Luxemburg, and Germany. We welcome him home, and wish him much success.

Annie Johnson wishes to thank the Cloth Room for the lovely birthstone ring she received for a Christmas gift, and also for the cooperation shown in the past year, and hopes she can be of more service to you.

Mr. Scarce takes this opportunity to thank the Cloth Room for the nice overcoat he received for a Christmas gift. It was greatly apprectiated. He also wishes to thank the Cloth Room employees for the fine

[continued at the bottom of Column 4] spirit of cooperation shown during the past year. Mr. Scarce wishes for everyone a happy and successful New Year.

Since Mr. Scarce is thanking the Cloth Room for the gift he received, we (the Cloth Room employees) would also like to express our thanks and gratitude for all the nice things he has done for us. He is not only an employer, but a friend to all as well. For the coming year we pledge our cooperation in everything, that we might help Mr. Scarce to make the Cloth Room a still better place in which to work.

--------------------

[An image header spans columns 4 and 5] PREPARATION DEPARTMENT N-E-W-S

[Column 4] Mr. and Mrs Nelson Phillips, Sgt. Gartrell McDuffie of Camp Livingston, La., and Mr. Tang Watt of Ware Shoals were the supper guests of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Terrel Christmas night.

The first shift welcomes Mrs. Nettie McCall back to work. Mrs. McCall has been out due to illness. We are glad to have you back, Nettie.

Mrs. Allie Mae Stockton visited in Columbia, S. C., recently.

We are glad to report that Mr. James Barnett, who has been ill, is now able to be back at work.

Mr. and Mrs. Jess Hughes motored to Belton Christmas day to see his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Hughes.

Mrs. Bessie Robinson and children, Max, Madge, Margaret, and Martha, and Miss Ruth Campbell spent the Christmas holidays in Shelby, N. C., with Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Campbell and other relatives.

Miss Grace Brown, a teacher in the Kingstree High School, Mrs. W. D. Simpson, of Toccoa, Ga., and Edgar Brown, C.W.T., stationed at New London, Conn., visited their sister, Mrs.

[continued top of Column 5] Billie Phillips, during the holidays.

Harold Harper, an employee in the slasher room, tells us that he is soon to report to the draft board in Greenville for examination to become a member of Uncle Sam's armed forces. Best of luck to you, "Pee Wee."

Mr. Roy Burnette reports that he is leaving the first shift to start work on the second shift. Everyone hates to see him go, but wish him much success.

The first shift welcomes Paul Foster back to work in the Slasher room. Paul has recent- ly received his discharge from the U. S. Navy.

Miss Frances Campbell, of Shelby, N. C., is visiting her sisters, Mrs. Bessie Robinson and Miss Ruth Campbell.

Cpl. J. D. Grigg, recently returned veteran from the E. T. O., spent the weekend here as guest of Mrs. Bessie Robinson and Miss Ruth Campbell.

The first shift regrets to report that Dot McWhite has quit. We're going to miss you, Dot, and hope you can soon be back with us. --------------------

[column 4] Union Services

(Cont. from page 1, col. 5)

tions that might be needed during the ensuing year.

Mr. White, in a short talk, delivered the bonds to the pastors while Messrs. Atkinson and Reid spoke briefly about the gifts.

The three pastors of the churches, in short talks, accepted the gifts on behalf o the members of their respective churches.

During the past year, four of these union services have been held and plans have been made to continue these services during the year 1946, and as soon as the fifth Sunday arrives, another union service will be held ar either the Slater Baptist or Methidist Churches. Plans for this service will be announced later. ------------------

[Column 4] Actors Are

(Con't from page 1, col. 4)

Dean and Mrs. W. Earle Reid.

This supper was sponsered by the Slater Community Association. -------------------

[Column 4] We always love those who admire us, and we do not always love those whom we admire. - La Rochefoucauld. ------------

[Column 5] Civic Club

(Con't. from page 1, col. 2)

Ruby Reid, Blanche Acree, Frank Cook, Hines Richardson, and Inez Graham. --------------------

[Column 5] Charity begins at home and generally dies from lack of out- of-door exercise; sympathy travels abroad extensively. - Anonymous. ----------------

[Column 5] Nothing is so firmly believed as that which we least know. - Montaigne. -------

[Column 5] GIVE THE NEW MAN A FEW SAFTEY POINTERS [An illustration of 3 dogs: a bulldog, tied to a post with its leash fully extended, a scared dog, and a dog talking in the scared dog's ear]

Last edit 13 days ago by LKohnle
gcls_SN_027d
Complete

gcls_SN_027d

Page Four THE SLATER NEWS January 17, 1946

[Column 1] Former Pastor Speaks At Church

"Men in the combat area worshipped God in every conceivable kind of place," said Chaplain Charles T. Thompson as he spoke at the Slater Baptist Church Sunday night, January 6. On this occasion, Captain Thompson said that, as a member and former pastor of the church just mentioned, he wished to consider his message as an account of his stewardship during his absence.

Accordingly, he told many of his experiences as a combat chaplain, emphasizing the fact that the men worshipped God just where they were. In this connection, the speaker told of services held in such places as fox holes, cow stalls, buildings of all kinds, and even in fields and forests. Often the men stood in snow and rain to have a service.

As a combat chaplain with troops directly on the front battle line, Captain Thompson spoke from a wealth of experiences. He underwent all of the dangers and hazards common to the front line solder, and lived with the men to whom he ministered. Since he was "one of them," he knows from actual experience that these men worshipped God just as they were, and wherever they were.

Chaplain Thompson expressed his appreciation to God for his safe return home, and thanked those who had remembered him with their prayers and letters while he was away.

Although Captain Thompson has not yet been discharge, we are happy that he is now on furlough and during this leave has visited Slater several times.

Mrs. Thompson, who is the former Miss Elizabeth Tapp, of Greer, and little daughter, Ann, remained in Slater most of the time while Chaplain Thompson was overseas. However, they joined him in Durham, N. C., shortly after his return from Europe. The people of Slater welcome both Mrs. Thompson and Ann along with Chaplain Thompson, and rejoice with the three of them that they are together again.

NEWSPAPER NEEDS GOOD REPORTING

When you receive The Slater News every two weeks you like to take it home and read it. Of course you do! For, like the newspaper you read daily, your company publication contains news of especial interest to you and very often even more so than your daily newspaper, for your company publication contains information about the product you're making and intimate items and stories concerning the people you work with and meet every day. You see, it's really a personal newspaper designed especially to inform you as to what is going on in the plant and to keep you in close touch with the doings of your fellow workers.

In order that your company publication may function properly, it has an editor and a staff just like any large newspaper

[continued bottom of column 2] or magazine. The editor is responsible for the publishing and production of your publication and writes much of the content. The reporters send in personal items, social notes, news of births, engagements, marriages and deaths from various departments. These items are duly printed because they concern the everyday life of your fellow workers which you, as a member of this organization, are natually interested in.

So, you see, your company publication operates along the same lines as that of your daily newspaper. The only real difference being that your publication covers the activities of one entire business organization, while a newspaper covers the activities of the world at large.

A publication is only as good as its staff. You, as a regular recipient of your company publication, are a member of our staff. We depend on you to keep us informed as to what goes on in your department because, as an active member of your department, you are in a position to gather news and personal items which can be easily overlooked by even the

[continued bottom of column 3] most conscientious reporter.

Make it your business to have your own publication just as you want it! By this we mean that you should take a personal interest in your company publication by sending in any news of interest you may chance to come across. By doing this, you'll be a valuable supplement to our regular staff and we'll be able to cover the goings on in this organization much more completely.

Did we hear you say, "But I'm not a reporter!" You're wrong there! There're news items all around you waiting to be uncovered. Everyone of your fellow employees is potential news copy. Take a look around you. That fellow next to you has birthdays, wedding anniversaries, and perhaps children going to school, all of which are substantial news items. The same goes for everybody else in your department. There's some kind of story in every employee you come in contact with, and we'll be glad to print them if you'll submit

[continues bottom of column 4] them to us. And don't worry about composition and spelling. That's our job. You just send in the bare facts of the story and we'll be only too glad to edit and rewrite it for you.

Take a real interest in your company publication. If it is interesting to read now, think of how much more interesting it will be if your own items appear in it. You'll feel the glow of literary accomplishment and we, in turn, will be grateful for the news and information you supply.

That's the story! We want

[continues bottom of column 5] The Slater News to be the very best we can make it, and we're depending on you to try your hand at reporting the doings of your department and the people in it. Honest, you'll find it's a lot of fun being a reporter, and it will be a source of continual satisfaction to you to know that your department is well represented in The Slater News regularly. Get that pencil sharpened and let's go!

[top of column 2]

VARIABLE WEATHER HOLDS LIMELIGHT

The weather at Slater is usually mild and seldom causes any great deal of comment by anyone for it is, as a general rule, taken as a matter of course. However, the weather for the past month has leaped into the limelight for during the past month, it has certainly "acted up."

To begin with, it snowed three times before Christmas and on Sunday before Christmas the last of these snows appeared. The next day was Christmas Eve and on this day, it sleeted and rained with the rain freezing. It can be truly said that Slaterites enjoyed a "White Christmas" for ice, snow and sleet greeted the kiddies when they arose on Christmas morning to find out what Santa Claus had brought them.

To their elders, it meant a great many discomforts for the ice had caused many trees to break and, also, power and telephone lines to snap, and thus the Village of Slater was literally cut off from the rest of the world. The ice and snow melted Christmas day and soon the ice and snow were gone, but it was several days before power could be restored and much longer before all of the telephone lines were definitely cleared up.

Then the weather again made a shift and this time instead of being cold and snowy, it had changed to warm and humid. According to reports from the local Weather Bureau in Greenville, approximately four inches of rain fell in about a two-day period and, as a result, streams ran over their banks and water stood in a body in the rear of the mill coming up almost to the Boiler Room and Warehouse.

We believe this is going from one extreme to the other, but, no doubt, the weather will soon get back on schedule and cease to be a topic of primary importance.

[image and caption span columns 3 through 5] [image: women servers feeding men at tables at a banquet]

Each year Mr. J. A. White, Plant Manager, gives a dinner for the supervisors and key men of the plant at Christmas time. In this picture can be seen about 200 men rapidly doing away with catfish, fried chicken, and the other good things to be found on the menu at Dave Stansell's famous eating place.

[top of column 3] IT CAN BE DONE

The man who says, "It can't be done!" Although he knows it can, Is often lazy in his ways And rude to fellow men. It can be done, no matter what, The bulwark in the way. And he who says, "I can! and tries Starts on the task, today!

The man who says, "It can't be done!" Will very often find; That in this world of men who can He's always left behind. For he who diligently strives To seek a way to do Will find the task half finished While the problem still is new!

The man who says, "It can't be done!" Find life a friendless thing; The man who says, "It can be done!" Is happy as a king. He's licked before he makes a start, The man who will not try, But he who says, "It can be done!" Will sure as heck get by! --By Russell Doyle

[top of column 4] Chaplain Heard By Slaterites

Chaplain Charles T. Thompson, of the Army of the United States and a former pastor of the Slater Baptist Church, was the principal speaker at the dinner given by J. A. White, Plant Manager, to the supervisors and key men at Dave Stansell's on December 22.

The Chaplain told of his experiences with the soldiers in the famous Battle of the Bulge and how at first our forces had to give ground, but as soon as the German Army was stopped in this engagement they began to advance and did until the Germans finally surrendered.

He told of the services held in fox holes and others held under heavy shell fire. He also explained how the chaplains were able to counsel with the men and of the many things he could do for the soldiers which greatly aided their personal life and affairs.

Everyone enjoyed the Chaplain's address and were glad to hear and know that our soldiers were able to have the men of the Chaplains' Corps with them as they faced the dangers and hardships of the battlefield.

Several men also contributed short talks. Among these were: Frank A. Cook, R. P. Alexander, C. G. Hyer, and R. P. Canham. Mr. White, in his remarks, thanked all present for their fine work of the past year and asked their continued support in 1946.

About 200 men enjoyed the affair. After a hearty dinner and the various talks the occasion came to a close.

[top of column 5] JOHNSON PREACHES ON WORLD PROBLEMS

In his New Year's message to the congregation of the local Baptist Church, Rev. Clyde M. Johnson stressed nine points as attributes of the kind of a Saviour the world needs.

He said -- "We (the world) needs a Saviour who:

1. "Can speak with authority about God and Heaven

2. "Loves the world with a measureless love.

3. "Will blot out forever our sins and failures.

4. "Can give us a new heart which will make sin hateful and make right natural.

5. "Can inspire us to conquer evil.

6. "Will give us an ideal, a living example, a goal toward which to move.

7. "Is able to bestow upon His followers the inspiration and guidance of the Holy Spirit.

8. "Is a human Saviour and is able to sympathize with humanity's griefs and difficulties.

9. "Is Divine, omnipresent, omnipotent, and omniscient."

Rev. Johnson has resigned his pastorate at Slater and goes to Pelzer in January to take up work there.

-----

It is ridiculous for any man to criticize the works of another if he has not distinguished himself by his own performances.--Addison.

-----

If you confer a benefit, never remember it. If you receive one, never forget it.--Chilon.

-----

A man can't very well make for himself a place in the sun if he keeps continually taking refuge under the family tree. --Anonymous.

Last edit 12 days ago by LKohnle
Displaying all 4 pages