Page 2

OverviewTranscribeVersionsHelp

Here you can see all page revisions and compare the changes have been made in each revision. Left column shows the page title and transcription in the selected revision, right column shows what have been changed. Unchanged text is highlighted in white, deleted text is highlighted in red, and inserted text is highlighted in green color.

5 revisions
Sandy Spring Museum at May 04, 2022 04:25 PM

Page 2

The Curculio.
Mr. Winn Gunn, of Shelbyville, Kentucky,
sends us the following interesting statement in reference
to the destruction of this pest to fruit:

In the spring of 1860, I noticed some of my plums
punctured. Having succeeded in catching the
[several lines illegible due to paper fold]
it around my plum trees. I removed
the grass about a foot around the tree, placed trashwool
on the cleared ground, and wrapt it around
the forks of the tree. On looking the next day, I
found my trap had caught "a number of the enemy,"
they having become entangled in the wool.
This tree produced a bountiful crop, while the fruit
on others in twenty feet of it "came to naught."
1861 I treated part of the others the same way -- with
like result. Also in 1862. In 1863 I treated all my
trees the same way. A more healthy and abundant
crop of plums I never saw. I have eight varieties
-- I have a free-stone damson that deserves a place
in every fruit yard, being hardy, and very prolific,
a superior fruit for canning or drying.

Page 2