Jane Lathrop Stanford Papers

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Pages That Mention Dr. Clark

Ross Affair: Notebook containing D. S. Jordan's statement with exhibits and ptd. report of Committee of Economists

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no personal acquaintance with Mayor Phelan or with any of the Democratic managers, nor any particular interest in their plans. There are countless grave dangers behind the antiChinese agitation, but what he said was neither extreme nor revolutionary. Dr. Ross presented the usual protectionist argument for the preservation of an American scale of living. I doubt the soundness of this argument, but most public men are influenced by it. The same view has been lately developed by Justice Brewer and by Senator Bard.

In any case, Dr. Ross had nothing whatever in common with the anti-Chinese agitators. He has always been strenuously opposed to Socialism as well as to Anarchism; and he is totally opposed to the methods of violence by which the labor organizations are trying to carry their point.

At the University Dr. Ross has been a constant source of strength. He is one of the best teachers, always just, moderate and fair. He is beloved by his students and has risen steadily in the estimation of his colleagues, some of whom were pretty hard upon him four years ago.

In the times of trouble in the University he has been most Loyal, accepting extra work and all kinds of embarrassments without a word of complaint. The sickness of Dr. Warner, the failure of Dr. Clark, and the sudden departure of Dr. Powers, left him on each of three years with half the work of another man in addition to his own. But he took this uncomplainingly

Last edit almost 4 years ago by MikeH
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Exhibit "S"

---COPY---

San Francisco, Cal.

(Date any time after May 21,)

Dear Dr. Ross:

After seven years of association I was able to write of you recently to Mrs. Stanford in the following terms:

''At the University Dr. Ross has been a constant source of strength. He is one of the best teachers, always just, moderate and fair. He is beloved by his students and has steadily risen in the estimation of his colleagues.''

''In the time of trouble in the University he has been most loyal, accepting extra work and all kinds of embarrassments without a word of complaint. The sickness of Dr. Warner, the failure of Dr. Clark, and the sudden departure of Prof. Powers left him on each of three years with half the work of another man in addition to his own. But he took this uncomplainingly and I did not know till it was over that he was in consequence not strong enough to stand up to lecture and had to spend his afternoons in bed. If he had been a selfish man he would not have overtaxed himself.''

He is ''a wise learned and noble man, one of the most loyal and devoted of all the band we have brought together.''

You are at liberty to use this letter in seeking a position.

(Signed)

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