Box 16, Folder 2: Grasses and Plants of Illinois 1856

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The elementary substances that enter into the composition of grasses are [thirteen] fourteen

[List of elementary substances]

The analysis of 20 different species shows the following elements in all:

1. Oxygen 2. Hydrogen 3. Carbon 4. Chlorine 5. Phosphorus 6. Sulphur 7. Lime 8. Magnesia 10. Potash 11. [Soda] 9. Silica 12 Iron 13. Manganise 19 of them contained ironNitrogen though found in wheat is not mentioned in these analysis &c &c

These elements are variously combined forming what chemists technically call salts, acids &c

Chloride of Potassium KCL Carbonate of Lime CaO3 Chloride of Sodium (common salt) Phosphate of lime " magnesia " iron Oxygen & Hydrogen (Water)

Phosphoric acid Sulphuric acid H1S04 Carbonic acid Silicic acid. Per. oxide of Maugauese Mn02 Sesquin (or Per) Oxyide of Iron Fe203 Oxide of Potassium Oxide of Sodium.

Last edit 3 months ago by EricRoscoe
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The secondary or compound vegetable products found in the family of grasses are

[List of chemical products and compositions; forumulas, atomic weights, etc.]

Dr Jackson PO Rep 1855 p 167-Starch of corn changes by germinating into dextrine (gum), and glucose (grape sugar); then into cane=sugar; then back to starch again in the full grown grain.

Last edit 3 months ago by EricRoscoe
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[Calculations]

No fact is better established than that the substance of plants is in a great degree consumed in the formation of the seed. The starch of tubers is transferred through various transformants to the seed. It is equally well established that if we prevent the formation of seed by destroying the flowers we cause the rich stores of vegetable life to be accumulated in the body of the plant, [either] usually in the form of bulbs, tubers, &c. It is this principle that shows the importance of cutting hay just before the ripening the seed, that being the time when the plants have accumulated the greatest amount of vegetable products, and when the least amount of these product have been absorbed to form the seed.

[Table]. About 1 in ILL to every 44 in the world.

Last edit 3 months ago by EricRoscoe
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There are a hundred & twenty five different kinds of grass, including the cerial [cereal] grains within the state of Illinois, 101 of them being native to the soil 11 introduced, and are now found in a wild state-and 10 that are only known in cultivation.

Introduced No. 5, 6, 8, 15, 39, 40, 45, 69, 92, 93, 115 Cultivated No. 76, 77, 78, 80, 83, 91, 95, 117, 124, 125

Of these it is proposed in the present paper to give such discriptions [descriptions], accompanied by figures as will enable any one to detect the different species; to show their general character, and uses, if any; and to give some general observations on the nature of grasses, in general.-

Though rice might be cultivated at the southern extreme of the state it is not at all probable that it will ever be produced to any considerable extent in Illinois.-

[sketch]

Last edit 3 months ago by EricRoscoe
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We give figures illustrating in a more or less full manner nearly every genus of grass found in Illinois.

The different kinds of grass are naturally adapted to different situations (stations) some preferring low wet grounds others grow only on land that is elevated and dry. Some prefer the shade of forest trees, while others flourish best on the most exposed parts of the broad prairies, fully exposed to the rays of the sun from morning till night. Other species are aquatic, and will only grow on land constantly covered with water.

Buds are formed at each joint; and as the joints or nodes of running roots are very short and numerous, this is [forms] means of a very rapid propogation. Every small section of one of these roots contain a number of buds or eyes. This quality of the root-stalks of grass is taken advantage of to impose the condition of meadows by "scarifying" and it becomes a pest when found in species which we desire to exterminate. Thus the crouch when cut by the plough only sends up the more numerous shoots.

Sugar cane at the south is propogated by burying a portion of the stem containing several joints, with their buds. These buds, shoot up to form the new plants, and also send down roots to seek the necessary supply of vegetable food.

Last edit 3 months ago by EricRoscoe
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