Series 1 Oliver McNaughton

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were in the railroad yards of Halifax right by the docks and in a place where we could see nothing and nobody could see us.

We were marched into our boat, (the boat I told you about when I was home). She is a wonder, over 900 feet long, and standing on "A" deck, it is about 60 or 70 feet to the water. There were about 6000 troops aboard besides the crew, for although a one time passenger vessel she was armed. As we were in the harbor for some time I got a good view of Halifax, with its forts and wireless station. It is certainly a dingy, dirty looking city and the last place on earth I would like to live in. Of course nearly all seaport towns have this appearance.

We had three battalions from Camp Borden and two from the West, - One from Edmonton. I met one fellow who cooked in the next circle to me in Ramsays. Ramsays son

Last edit about 3 years ago by Jannyp
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is in that battalion too. There was a draft of officers, an Army Medical Corps, etc, etc. Also hospital suppliers, ammunition, etc. She had heavy cargo, and she travels like the deuce.

We had great weather for the trip. Very foggy till we got by the Labrador current and a thunderstorm the next night. She lost time a little, but after that we went some, although the zig-zag course she took after we got into the danger zone hampered her progress. The West half of the Atlantic is as cold as Greenland, but as we neared the Old Country and got into the region of the Gulf stream the air became quite balmy, but always with a salty smell.

Considering other trips, very few were seasick, but some

Last edit over 2 years ago by LoriF
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were real sick, and I was one of them. I got over it before we landed. Frank Wilson was worse than I. Jack Evans was sick for a day, etc. etc. Many felt tough and sick but did not get really seasick.

We wore lifebelts from the time we set sail till we landed. - Wore them all day and slept with them either on us or right by our hands. They were,̶ ̶r̶a̶t̶h̶e̶r̶,̶ ̶life preserving jackets rather than life belts. We were sure glad to get rid of them.

We were some time in Liverpool harbor before we docked as the ship had to wait for the tide. Then it took some time to disembark as we were entrained as soon as disembarkation and left immediately for camp.

Fortunately, some of my trip was done in daylight and I had an oppurtunity to see some of that region of England until about half.

Last edit over 2 years ago by LoriF
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way through the "Black Region" (the coal region about Birmingham). Everything is black and dirty, the towns especially. Jack Evans lives about thirty miles from Birmingham, and he has a brother living in that city. So, he went within a short distance of his home. I̶ It was dark there, and I saw no more till we arrived, and then, everything was so dark that we saw nothing till daylight the next morning. This country is kept in darkness at night. Blinds in trains are all drawn, and motor trucks and automobiles with a very dim light, etc. etc.

The dinky little coaches with their compartments containing eight each, amused the boys, -also the engines, but when they got going between 60 & 70 miles an hour, we had to admit that they travelled some, and the coaches we rode in, altho' third class, were

Last edit over 2 years ago by LoriF
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very comfortable. A smoother ride than you would get in a first class coach in Canada. Typical English weather to-day, raining & misty. The most of us have been occupying most of our time trying to master, pence shillings, crowns & sovereigns. I have it down pretty fair now, but some fellows are having a time of it.

A few things here are cheap but on average they are pretty dear. This is due to the war of course.

While dealing with England I might mention some impressions I got of the country.

First and foremost I was impressed with the freshness and greenness of everything. Grass, even along the railroad, as green as you would find it in Ontario in May. Secondly, the many towns and cities with their inevitable factories & smoke, and a station every mile or so. Thirdly, that the country is just like (OVER)

Last edit over 2 years ago by LoriF
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