1871-1900 Yaquina Head Lighthouse Letter books

Pages That Need Review

Box 253 YB 1887 1888

2

2

1887 Dec. 21 Yaquina Bay - Oreg. Newport - Light establ't - Sen. Bill ??? asked.

1888 Jan'y 13 Yaquina City - Whistling buoy _ adrift - Biuoy, black, No. 1 - gone - reported June 17 Yaquina Bay, near Newport, Oreg. - Light establ't Board's decision - adverse 1889 Feb'y 25 Yaquina Bay, Oreg. Pile beacons - action approved. July 19 Yaquina Bay, Oreg. Buoy placed action approved Dec. 16 Yaquina Bay, Oreg. Light establ't - Senate Bill 459 -??? report? asked.

Last edit over 1 year ago by jwallace

Coast Guard District narrative histories 1945

49

49

Fast Water Buoys

13th District Buoy

(left) Assemblage of Pre-Fabricated Buoy.

(above) Prefabricated Buoy Ready for Installation

(lower left) Prefabricated Buoy on Station in Columbia River

Last edit over 1 year ago by EarthYake
51

51

#3 Side Light and Screen

125'

#2 Center Light

#1 Side Light and Screen

Edge of Channel

Axis of Lanterns

Axis of Screens

400'

125' - 125'

Red Sector

Plan for Setting Arlington Channel Limiting Range Lights Installed 19 Feb. 1945

X Points to be Definitely Located

Last edit over 1 year ago by EarthYake
58

58

Abbreviated Statement of TonnagesThrough Bonneville and Dalles-Celilo Canal(1911-1939)Through Bonneville Locks Through Dalles-( Cascade Locks Prior to 1938) Celilo Canal

Period Oil Prod. Wheat Raft Logs Total Tonnage Oil Prod. Wheat Total Tonnage1920 (Yearly Average) * 33807 (Canal Comp. 1915) 4020192419261928193019321934193619381939

*Indicates that the tonnage, if any, was small and unimportant.

Note: Total petroleum products shown above are about 90% gasoline and 10% fuel and diesel oil.

Last edit about 1 year ago by EarthYake
60

60

This page is not transcribed, please help transcribe this page

Last edit about 1 year ago by EarthYake
67

67

ANRAC

Radio Control of Aids to Navigation

Includes Control of All Gas and Electric Apparatus on Buoys andFixed AidsCoast Guard HDQ'TRS. Navy Dept.Communication Engineering DivisionConfidential 2 Nov. 1944

Last edit about 1 year ago by EarthYake
80

80

Hours of Use or No. of Interrogations of Existing CORACON Stations(June - August, 1915)

June July AugustArago 12 hrs. 7 hrs. 3 hrs.Astoria 30 inter. 76 inter. 112 inter.Blanco 50 inter. 20 inter. 16 inter.Heceta Head 12 hrs.22 min. 5 hrs. 43 min 5 hrs. 48 min.Port Angeles 91 hrs. 60 hrs. 65 hrs.Quillayute Not. estbd. 7 hrs. 15 hrs. 45 min.Shelton 4 hrs. 284 inter. 112 inter.Tillamook 26 hrs. 40 hrs. 25 hrs.Yaquina Head 12 hrs. 8 hrs. 6 hrs.

*Decrease in usage is probably due to gradual reduction in the training program following V-EDay. These figures were taken from monthly reportssubmitted to Headquarters.

Two Model PBY5A planes were specially equipped byHeadquarters with appropriate RADAR equipment required forthe purpose of flight calibration for the RACONS, and with LORAN receivers for use in LORAN system checking. Theseplanes were assigned from Headquarters to check RACONS onthe West Coast and Alaska; the first of these, RADAR RACHEL,arrived in the District in May, 1945. Flight test procedurerequired that approimately 8 bearings be selected andruns, at various altitudes, be made on these bearings sothat the area entirely surrounding the RACON was covered.Data of the test, together with a graphic plot were preparedfor each calibration and forwarded via the Aids to Naviga-tion Officer to Headquarters. Results of tests made in the 13th Naval District were as shown below. Three DistrictLORAN Units were checked but data regarding these tests did not pass through the District Office as those units oper-ated directly under Headquarters. (See LORAN).

RACON "A" Band "B" Band Antenna MaximumStation Model Coverage Coverage Elevation RangeAstoria, YJ 49 North 89 North 750 65 "A"Ore. 65 East 92 East50 South 71 South60 West 127 West

Last edit about 1 year ago by EarthYake
81

81

(Continued)RACON "A" BAND "B" BAND ANTENNA MAXIMUMSTATION MODEL COVERAGE COVERAGE ELEVATION RANGEPort Angeles YJ 61 North 95 North 25 67 "A"Wash. 60 East 101 East 102 "B"(2nd check) 16 South 17 South55 West 73 West

Seattle,Wn. YJ 30 North 49 North 505 35 "A"11 East 42 East 55 "B"28 South 40 South 33 West 46 West

Tillamook, AN/CPN-3 20 North to Southwest 25Ore. 70 South to Southwest60 Southwest to Northwest

During the initial check of the Port Angeles RACON, the YG homing beacon interfered with the signal; the second test, after the equipment had been adjusted, proved quite satisfactory considering the surrounding terrain, and showed and increase over a previous check of 35 miles on a 90 [degree] bearing from the beacon. In the northern quadrants, good coverage was obtained but it decreased slightly over Vancouver Island, B.C. and became quite poor to the south where the mountains were approximately 7500 to 8500 feet hight. The RACON antennae were located on Ediz Hook near Port Angeles, Washington, in the open with no restrictions other than the mountainous terrain.

The anternnae at the Astoria RACON were elevation 750 feet above sea level but this elevation did not provide the coverage originally hoped for. High hills to the northeast across the Columbia River and mountains to the east reduced the ranges in those directions, while a grove of trees 150 feet from the station (about 50 feet in height) restricted the signals at lower altitudes to the north, northeast and east. It was determined by the pilot that the beacon afforded good coverage over water and fair coverage over land. The Tillamook RACON was check while a forest fire was raging about 20 miles distant from the station which caused dense clouds of smoke to ascend about 8000 feet into the air. However, there was no indication that the smoke affected the beacon's signals in any way, as the mountains restricted the

-61-

Last edit 11 months ago by caroleholmson
86

86

It was the intention of the Coast Guard to make the most possible use of RADAR and other electronic devices in order to increase the efficiency of its public services, One shore base installation was established and two installations were tentatively scheduled to be used as an experimental setup to determine whether necessary coverage could be provided for air sea rescue operation. No program other than experimental had been devised for furnishing coverage for the protection of small craft along the coast and in the harbors.

The District Coast Guard Officer of each District was directed to investigate the possible applications of shore based RADAR to the particular problems of his District. Consideration was given to the need of air sea rescue to provide warning of potential or real distress, to determine the assistance to possible control of shipping in and around harbors and the use of RADAR as a supplementary aid for coastal lookout as well as in checking the positions of navigational or any other applications which would increase the efficiency of Coast Guard functions. Results of these investigations by the District Coast Guard Officers were submitted to Headquarters in order that no phase of RADAR application was overlooked in overall study.

The end of the war found the District not only operating 14 RACON Stations, but a new electronic aid, LORAN, with stations at Cape Blanco, Oregon, Point Grenville, Washington and Spring Island in Vancouver, B.C. A Monitor Station for LORAN had been set up at Yaquina Head, Oregon. Installation and supervision of LORAN was controlled entirely by Headquarters. However, on survey trips to determine sites for the various stations, representative of the District Coast Guard Officer, 13th Naval District, had been present. The original installations at the aforementioned stations were temporary, in that they were mobile units, contracts having been let to private industry for the construction of permanent stations. The aids to Navigation Office distributed 1500 temporary LORAN navigation charts covering the coast from Cape Blanco to Spring Island to Army, Navy and Canadian Air Stations, as well as innumerable warships. These two stations were the "Slaves" with the "Master Station" located at Point Grenville, Washington. Headquarters Detachment "G", which was in supervision of the District LORAN Units, operated with headquarters at Newport, Oregon. All stations operated on a 2H4 rate. Favorable reports were received from mariners who had picked up the pulse from the mobile units at great distances at sea.

Last edit about 2 years ago by JohnnaMiller
87

87

Indirectly, the Aids to Navigation Section figured in installation of the LORAN on Spring Island off the coast of British Vancouver. Equipment to be moved to the Island from Seattle included trucks, jeeps, weapon carriers, Quonset Huts, materials and equipment for clearing land as well as supplies for 34 men to be stationed there during temporary service. The only ship available in the District for the transporting of these supplies and men, was the tender BASSWOOD. The BASSWOOD made several voyages to transfer equipment until the tender was assigned to the South Pacific, (see tenders), and an Army Freight Ship was sent as relief. The completion of Spring Island as a LORAN Station added another link in the LORAN system covering the West Coast from Mexico through Alaska.

In addition to its previous peace time function, the Aids to Navigation Section, had expanded to include in its duties the 14 RACON Stations maintenance and operation as well as three LORAN Stations together with their monitor Station. The assistance rendered by LORAN, for distances at sea to 1400 miles, was a far cry from the guiding light of the early LIGHTSHIP NO. 50 whose oil lantern set out a gleam a scant 10 miles. And, in addition, not only the sea but the air became safe as LORAN Helped pilots fix their positions with pin-point accuracy. The Coast Guard had made the air, as well as the Sea, safer for navigation.

Last edit about 2 years ago by JohnnaMiller
Records 1 – 10 of 456