FL661431

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independence & even haughtiness with an appearance of dignity
in the character of the men rarely to
be met with among other differently
governed natives. As they have no
titles for distinction nor a proper name
for a chief so they have neither a word
in their language to signify a servant,
and certainly though the women are most
subservient, as I shall show, to the men
no man has an idea of serving another.
This idea of their own dignity & importance
is carried so far that they hesitate
long before they apply the term Sir
to any European even when they know
full well of the distinction we make,
(between master & servant).

In their original state there must have
have been some very spirited & resolute men
among the Aborigines who gained renown
by their bravery, but their subjugation
by Europeans has an evident tendency
to [indecipherable] their spirits & to subdue their pride.
Still among themselves ther are frequent
instances where they display a very haughty
spirit, the slightest insult may provoke

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