James Adam diary: 1857-1863 (Ms. Codex 1948)

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Diary comprising two volumes spanning the years from 1857 to 1863 written by James Adam. Volume 1 contains Adam's descriptions his journey from Scotland to India as a medical officer. On August 15, 1857 Adam departed from London on a steamer ship the Candia. He wrote of his sea voyage including officers he traveled with, the weather, landscapes, missing his family, sea sickness, and miles traveled. He arrived at Kalkota on November 5, 1857. Adam worked at a hospital and witnessed a portion of the Indian Rebellion of 1857. In February 1858 Adam was deployed to the ship Belgravia to take charge of the wounded and sick at the South African Cape. He traveled with his servant Harold. Once anchored at Table Bay Adam described the native people, seeing Dr. Livingstone. Adam noted he had a muster of forty natives whom he reluctantly treated for skin diseases. There is a copy of a letter to his parents and pencil drawings of the Cape of Good Hope. On the journey back to Calcutta there was an incident with the captain regarding ailing horses. In June 1858 Adam mentioned seeing cholera cases, reading Waston and works on homeopathy. Adam also worked off of the H.M.S. Proserpine. In March 1859 Adam began his voyage back to England on the Ivanhoe he mentioned playing chess and catching fish. Reading volume 1 from back to front are poems and songs. One of the poems was "written on board the Candia". Tables of daily latitude and longitude for the voyages to India and England are in the volume. Some accounting of receipts and expenditures is in the volume. Adam arrived back in Edinburgh on August 5, 1859. Volume 2 commences in 1861. In sporadic entries Adam described his arrival and work at Bethnal House Asylum with Dr. Ritchie. and Dr. Miller. In August 1863 Adam wrote of his trip to Scotland and attending a wedding in Portobello. He mentioned seeing family members in Edinburgh. Reading volume 2 from back to front is a clipping of an epitaph for Lord Clyde pasted over writing in pencil. Adam wrote an autopsy of a young woman named Ann Jones aged 23. A majority of volume 2 is blank. Inscribed on the first leaf of volume 1: J. F. Adam journal, commenced August 13, 1857 on leaving home for the first time to sail for India. Inscribed on the last leaf of volume 1: James F. Adam, Surgeon, H.M.S. Proserpine. Volume 2 is inscribed: Private, Jame Adam M.D., January 20, 1861. https://franklin.library.upenn.edu/catalog/FRANKLIN_9977359130603681

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p. 6
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p. 6

Edinr. to York

I must part with my mother. Oh what a trial to leave & part with her whom I loved ["better than" is struck through] so dearly & my father too & Jessie Mary, Robert & William I assumed composure I was far from feeling. My heart was ready to burst but I must tear myself away. the hour has come & I must go My father Robt. Wm. Taylor, Fred, James T. Banks at the station bade me good bye & off we went Left N.B. Station at 9.15 Stopped Dunbar 5 minutes Berwick 10 minutes . I went outside the station at Berwick but it being dark I could see very little, however I saw the Tweed & could make out the general appearance of the town We stopped again at Newcastle & York at the latter we had 20 minutes & I went into the refreshment rooms to have a cup of coffee for which I paid 1/ rather scalped. I saw the Cathedral A young fellow sitting opposite me in the train & I went to see it, it is a

Last edit 4 months ago by Dendendaloom
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York to Lincoln

beautiful edifice one of the handsomest I ever saw. It was getting light when we left York so I sat up & had a look at the country round about. I slept a little probably 2 or 3 hours but it is very un- comfortable sleeping in a railway carriage Mr Inglis (of Gall & Inglis late in the Northbridge) was in the same carriage. I would have spoken to him & asked him to call on you but as I thought I would have time to write soon & it was such a short time from leaving home that I thought it of little use. The great difference between the appearance of Scotland & England is the general level appearance of the latter there is scarcely a hill visible throughout the whole extent, especially in the Southern part. Their fields I think are more nicely laid out than in Scotland instead of being separated by stone walls, they had hedges running between which adds greatly to the general beauty of the country. From York southwards there seems to have been a general flooding of

Last edit 6 months ago by Dendendaloom
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Lincoln to London

the country every field almost was covd. with water the grain some cut + some uncut lying steeped in it. At Lincoln we were obliged to change the line of rail. we got on to the Lincoln + Boston line the N.B. line being flooded The guard told us that a train had gone right on the N.B. line the day before was driven of the rails. Some passengers hurt + one nearly killed. As it was the line which we went on the train went through water nearly a mile (I believe it was mostly owing to the bursting of a large canal in Lincoln) We were detained 2 hours behind time of arrivig in London by this means On arriving in London at King's Cross I was astonished to see the bustle + stir everywhere the whole side of the station lined with Cabs one of which I engaged + drove to the Waverly Hotel in Cheapside. I shortly after called on Mr Nisbet at Guy's Hospital He told I would require to be off immediately to Southampton as our vessel would sail early on Saturday morning.

Last edit 6 months ago by Dendendaloom
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London. As I had nothing particular to keep me in London I told him I was quite ready to go down to Southampton on the Friday night- we went through Guy's Hospital + St Thomas' An operation was going on at Guy's at which I think they would have been nothing the worse of the assistance of some of our Edinr. Surgeons. With proper teachers the students in Guy's ought to make good practitioners as they see an immense deal of practice both dispensary + Hospital. I was astonished to see the number of patients waiting I never saw anything like it in our Infirmary. I went through some of the principal thouroughfares in London + then returned to the waverly to dinner What a continual bustle + stir is going on in London every part you can turn your eyes to presents the same scene was very anxious to call at Morrison's warehouse but I was told by so many different people differrent directions to Fore Street that I was obliged to give up the search in case I should run short

Last edit 6 months ago by Dendendaloom
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London to Southampton

of time. I saw St. Pauls & thought to make it out from that but I got quite into a labyrinth of streets. I left London at 5 oclock by the S.W. Rail for Southampton & got there about 8 oclock & called on Smith Barry + Co Mr Gowan's agents. they took charge of my luggage & put in on board for me & told me that the "Candia" would clear out at 7 oclock next morning (Saturday) but that a steamer would be ready at 11 oclock to take out passengers I put up at the Crown Hotel all night. where although a very good Hotel & everything very clean to appearance I spent a most miserable night. I thought I had been served with some not inveterate skin disease or other, but however the morning proved the real nature of the case my neck & arms testified very plainly[?] the cause. I got up early posted a letter or two & then took a walk out to see Southampton I returned to breakfast & shortly after found a friend of James Forbes to whom I had a letter

Last edit 3 months ago by Dendendaloom
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